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Robert Donat
Friedrich Robert Donat
Robert Donat
(18 March 1905 – 9 June 1958) was an English film and stage actor.[1] He is best remembered for his roles in Alfred Hitchcock's The 39 Steps (1935) and Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939), winning for the latter the Academy Award for Best Actor. Donat was also a successful stage actor, despite the challenge of chronic asthma from which he suffered.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Stardom 3 Later life and career 4 Death and legacy 5 Filmography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Donat was born in Withington, Manchester, the fourth and youngest son of Ernst Emil Donat, a civil engineer of German origin from Prussian Poland, and his wife Rose Alice Green.[2] He was of English, Polish, German and French descent and was educated at Manchester's Central High School for Boys
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The Observer
The Observer is a British newspaper published on Sundays. In the same place on the political spectrum as its sister papers The Guardian
The Guardian
and The Guardian
The Guardian
Weekly, whose parent company Guardian Media Group Limited acquired it in 1993, it takes a social liberal or social democratic line on most issues. First published in 1791, it is the world's oldest Sunday newspaper.[4]Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Nineteenth century 1.3 Twentieth century 1.4 Twenty-first century2 Supplements and features 3 The Newsroom 4 Bans 5 Editors 6 Photographers 7 Awards 8 Conventions sponsored 9 Bibliography 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] The first issue, published on 4 December 1791 by W.S. Bourne, was the world's first Sunday newspaper. Believing that the paper would be a means of wealth, Bourne instead soon found himself facing debts of nearly £1,600
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Frank Benson (actor)
Sir Francis "Frank" Robert Benson (4 November 1858 – 31 December 1939), commonly known as Frank Benson or F. R. Benson, was an English actor-manager. He founded his own company in 1883 and produced all but three of Shakespeare's plays.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 Filmography 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Tunbridge Wells, Benson was educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, and at the university was distinguished both as an athlete (winning the Inter-university three miles) and as an amateur actor. In the latter respect he was notable for producing at Oxford the first performance of a Greek play, the Agamemnon, in which many Oxford men who afterwards became famous in other fields took part.[1] On leaving Oxford, Benson took to the professional stage, and made his first appearance at the Lyceum, under Henry Irving, in Romeo and Juliet, as Paris, in 1882
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C. A. Lejeune
Caroline Alice (C. A.) Lejeune (1897–1973) was a British writer, best known as the film critic of The Observer from 1928 to 1960.Contents1 Family 2 Journalism and other writing 3 Death 4 References 5 External linksFamily[edit] C. A. Lejeune was the youngest child in a large Victorian family that resided at 10, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester. Her father was a Swiss cotton merchant who had come to England
England
after doing business in Frankfurt. Her mother, Louisa, who was the daughter of the Nonconformist minister Dr Alexander Maclaren, was a friend of C. P. Scott and of Caroline Herford, who was Caroline's godmother and Headmistress of Lady Barn House School, where Caroline received her elementary education
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Shaftesbury Avenue
Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, that runs in a north-easterly direction from Piccadilly Circus to New Oxford Street, crossing Charing Cross Road at Cambridge Circus. From Piccadilly Circus to Cambridge Circus it is in the City of Westminster, and from Cambridge Circus to New Oxford Street it is in the London Borough of Camden. Shaftesbury Avenue was built between 1877 and 1886 by the architect George Vulliamy and the engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette[1][2] to provide a north-south traffic artery through the crowded districts of St. Giles and Soho. It was also part of a slum clearance measure, to push impoverished workers out of the city centre;[citation needed] although the street's construction was stalled by legislation requiring rehousing some of these displaced residents, overcrowding persisted. Charles Booth's Poverty Map shows the neighbourhood makeup shortly after Shaftesbury Avenue opened
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Manchester
Coordinates: 53°28′46″N 2°14′43″W / 53.47944°N 2.24528°W / 53.47944; -2.24528Manchester City
City
and Metropolitan boroughClockwise from top: Skyline of Manchester
Manchester

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James Lansdale Hodson
James Lansdale Hodson (1891-1956) was a British novelist, scriptwriter and journalist. He was a war correspondent and northern editor of the Daily Mail.[1] Born in Bury, Lancashire
Bury, Lancashire
in 1891, Hodson worked as a war correspondent during World War II, and he wrote a war diary that was published by Victor Gollancz as a series of 7 books; Through the Dark Night, Towards the Morning, Before Daybreak, 'War in the Sun, Home Front, And Yet I like America and The Sea and the Land.[1] He also wrote the official British film Desert Victory
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James Hilton (novelist)
James Hilton (9 September 1900 – 20 December 1954) was an English novelist best remembered for several best-sellers, including Lost Horizon
Lost Horizon
and Goodbye, Mr. Chips. He also wrote Hollywood screenplays.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Novels2.1 Lost Horizon 2.2 Goodbye, Mr. Chips3 Oscar winner 4 Works4.1 Novels 4.2 Non-fiction 4.3 Short stories 4.4 Plays 4.5 Screenplays5 Adaptations and sequels of his works 6 Memorials 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Leigh, Lancashire, England, Hilton was the son of John Hilton, the headmaster of Chapel End School in Walthamstow
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London Films
London Films
London Films
Productions is a British film and television production company founded in 1932 by Alexander Korda
Alexander Korda
and from 1936 based at Denham Film Studios
Denham Film Studios
in Buckinghamshire, near London. The company's productions included The Private Life of Henry VIII
The Private Life of Henry VIII
(1933), Things to Come (1936), Rembrandt (1936), and The Four Feathers (1939). The facility at Denham was taken over in 1939 by Rank and merged with Pinewood to form D & P Studios. The outbreak of war necessitated that The Thief of Bagdad (1940) was completed in California, although Korda's handful of American-made films still had Big Ben
Big Ben
for their opening corporate logo.[1] After a restructuring of Korda's UK operations in the late 1940s, London Films
London Films
were now made at Shepperton
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Marlene Dietrich
Marie Magdalene "Marlene" Dietrich (/mɑːrˈleɪnə ˈdiːtrɪk/, German: [maɐ̯ˈleːnə ˈdiːtʁɪç]; 27 December 1901 – 6 May 1992)[1] was a German actress and singer who held both German and American citizenship.[2][3][4] Throughout her long career, (which spanned from the 1910s to the 1980s) she maintained popularity by continually reinventing herself.[5] In 1920s Berlin, Dietrich acted on the stage and in silent films. Her performance as Lola-Lola in The Blue Angel
The Blue Angel
(1930) brought her international fame and a contract with Paramount Pictures. Dietrich starred in Hollywood
Hollywood
films such as Morocco (1930), Shanghai Express (1932), and Desire (1936). She successfully traded on her glamorous persona and "exotic" looks, and became one of the highest-paid actresses of the era. Throughout World War II, she was a high-profile entertainer in the United States
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MGM-British Studios
MGM-British was a subsidiary of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
(MGM) initially established at Denham Film Studios
Denham Film Studios
in 1936. It was in limbo during the Second World War; however, following the end of hostilities, a facility was acquired in Borehamwood, which remained in use until it was closed in 1970.Contents1 Pre-war 2 Post-war 3 Principal productions 4 ReferencesPre-war[edit] The films produced at Denham were A Yank at Oxford
A Yank at Oxford
(1938), The Citadel (1938), Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939) and Busman's Honeymoon (US: Haunted Honeymoon, 1940). Production was initially headed by Michael Balcon. However, he left after a single film and was replaced by Victor Saville. The subsidiary was in abeyance during the war. Meanwhile, Amalgamated Studios Ltd constructed a large studio on the north side of Elstree Way between 1935 and 1937
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Smilin' Through (1932 Film)
Smilin' Through is a 1932 American pre-Code MGM romantic drama film based on the play by Jane Cowl and Jane Murfin, also named Smilin' Through. The film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture for 1932. It was adapted from Cowl and Murfin's play by James Bernard Fagan, Donald Ogden Stewart, Ernest Vajda and Claudine West. The movie was directed by Sidney Franklin and starred Norma Shearer, Fredric March, Leslie Howard and Ralph Forbes. The film was a remake of an earlier 1922 silent version also directed by Sidney Franklin which starred Norma Talmadge.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Box office 4 Awards and honors 5 See also 6 External links 7 NotesPlot[edit] John Carteret (Leslie Howard) is a wealthy man with a huge estate. He was set to marry Moonyeen Clare (Norma Shearer), but on their wedding day she was accidentally killed during the wedding ceremony by her drunken and jealous ex-fiance Jeremy Wayne (Fredric March), who actually meant to kill John
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Irving Thalberg
Irving Grant Thalberg (May 30, 1899 – September 14, 1936) was an American film producer during the early years of motion pictures. He was called "The Boy Wonder" for his youth and ability to select scripts, choose actors, gather production staff, and make profitable films, including Grand Hotel, China Seas, Camille, Mutiny on the Bounty, and The Good Earth. His films carved out an international market, "projecting a seductive image of American life brimming with vitality and rooted in democracy and personal freedom," states biographer Roland Flamini.[1]:3 He was born in Brooklyn, New York, and as a child was afflicted with a congenital heart disease that doctors said would kill him before he reached the age of thirty. After graduating high school he worked as a store clerk during the day and to gain some job skills took a night class in typing
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Jeffrey Richards
Jeffrey Richards (born c.1945[1]) is a British historian. Educated at Jesus College, Cambridge, he is Professor of Cultural History at Lancaster University. A leading cultural historian and film critic, he is the author of over 15 books on British cultural history. His books include The Popes and the Papacy in the Early Middle Ages 476-752 (1979), and Sir Henry Irving: A Victorian Actor and His World (2005). References[edit]^ Chris Arnot "Fast Forward: Jeffrey Richards", The Guardian, 11 January 2005External links[edit]Jeffrey Richards' homepageAuthority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 79047738 LCCN: n83062695 ISNI: 0000 0001 2140 9540 GND: 1094691658 SUDOC: 028519647 BNF: cb12033944w (data) BIBSYS: 90137308This article about a British historian or genealogist is a stub
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Julius Caesar (play)
The ghost of Caesar
Caesar
taunts Brutus about his imminent defeat. ( Copperplate engraving
Copperplate engraving
by Edward Scriven from a painting by Richard Westall: London, 1802.)The Tragedy of Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
is a history play and tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1599
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Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
(/ˈbɜːrmɪŋəm/ ( listen),[3] locally /ˈbɜːmɪŋ(ɡ)əm/ or /ˈbɜːmɪnəm/) is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands of England, standing on the River Rea
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