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Robert Altman
Robert Bernard Altman (/ˈɔːltmən/; February 20, 1925 – November 20, 2006) was an American film director, screenwriter, and producer. A five-time nominee of the Academy Award for Best Director
Academy Award for Best Director
and an enduring figure from the New Hollywood era, Altman was considered a "maverick" in making films with a highly naturalistic but stylized and satirical aesthetic, unlike most Hollywood films. He is consistently ranked as one of the greatest and most influential filmmakers in American cinema. His style of filmmaking was unique among directors, in that his subjects covered most genres, but with a "subversive" twist that typically relies on satire and humor to express his personal vision. Altman developed a reputation for being "anti-Hollywood" and non-conformist in both his themes and directing style
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Bonanza
Bonanza
Bonanza
is an NBC
NBC
television western series that ran from 1959 to 1973. Lasting 14 seasons and 431 episodes, Bonanza
Bonanza
is NBC's longest-running western, and ranks overall as the second-longest-running western series on U.S. network television (behind CBS's Gunsmoke), and within the top 10 longest-running, live-action American series. The show continues to air in syndication. The show is set in the 1860s and it centers on the wealthy Cartwright family, who lives in the area of Virginia City, Nevada, bordering Lake Tahoe. The series initially starred Lorne Greene, Pernell Roberts, Dan Blocker, and Michael Landon, and later featured at various times Guy Williams, David Canary, Mitch Vogel, and Tim Matheson
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Dutch East Indies
The Dutch East Indies
East Indies
(or Netherlands
Netherlands
East-Indies; Dutch: Nederlands(ch)-Indië; Indonesian: Hindia Belanda) was a Dutch colony consisting of what is now Indonesia. It was formed from the nationalised colonies of the Dutch East India Company, which came under the administration of the Dutch government in 1800. During the 19th century, the Dutch possessions and hegemony were expanded, reaching their greatest territorial extent in the early 20th century. This colony was one of the most valuable European colonies under the Dutch Empire's rule,[6] and contributed to Dutch global prominence in spice and cash crop trade in the 19th to early 20th century.[7] The colonial social order was based on rigid racial and social structures with a Dutch elite living separate from but linked to their native subjects.[8] The term Indonesia came into use for the geographical location after 1880
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Tattoo
A tattoo is a form of body modification where a design is made by inserting ink, dyes and pigments, either indelible or temporary, into the dermis layer of the skin to change the pigment. The art of making tattoos is tattooing. Tattoos fall into three broad categories: purely decorative (with no specific meaning); symbolic (with a specific meaning pertinent to the wearer); pictorial (a depiction of a specific person or item). Tattoos have historically been regarded in the West as 'uncivilised', and over the last 100 years the fashion has been associated mainly with sailors, working men and criminals
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United States Army Air Forces
The United States
United States
Army Air Forces (USAAF or AAF), informally known as the Air Force,[1] was the aerial warfare service of the United States of America during and immediately after World War II
World War II
(1939/41–1945), successor to the previous United States
United States
Army Air Corps and the direct predecessor of the United States Air Force
United States Air Force
of today, one of the five uniformed military services. The AAF was a component of the United States Army, which in 1942 was divided functionally by executive order into three autonomous forces: the Army Ground Forces, the Services of Supply (which in 1943 became the Army Service Forces), and the Army Air Forces
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Lexington, Missouri
Lexington is a city in Lafayette County, Missouri, United States. The population was 4,726 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Lafayette County.[6] Located in western Missouri, Lexington lies about 40 miles east of Kansas City
City
and is part of the Greater Kansas City Metropolitan Area
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RKO
RKO Pictures
RKO Pictures
is an American film production and distribution company. In its original incarnation, as RKO Radio Pictures Inc., it was one of the Big Five studios of Hollywood's Golden Age. The business was formed after the Keith-Albee-Orpheum (KAO) theater chain and Joseph P. Kennedy's Film Booking Offices of America
Film Booking Offices of America
(FBO) studio were brought together under the control of the Radio Corporation of America
Radio Corporation of America
(RCA) in October 1928.[a] RCA chief David Sarnoff
David Sarnoff
engineered the merger to create a market for the company's sound-on-film technology, RCA Photophone. By the mid-1940s, the studio was under the control of investor Floyd Odlum. RKO has long been renowned for its cycle of musicals starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers
Ginger Rogers
in the mid- to late 1930s
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Juvenile Delinquency
Juvenile delinquency, also known as "juvenile offending", is participation in illegal behavior by minors (juveniles, i.e. individuals younger than the statutory age of majority).[1] Most legal systems prescribe specific procedures for dealing with juveniles, such as juvenile detention centers, and courts. A juvenile delinquent in the United States is a person who is typically below 18 (17 in New York, Missouri, North Carolina, New Hampshire, and Texas) years of age and commits an act that otherwise would have been charged as a crime if they were an adult
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Jesuit
The Society of Jesus
Society of Jesus
(SJ – from Latin: Societas Iesu) is a scholarly religious congregation of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
which originated in sixteenth-century Spain. The members are called Jesuits.[2] The society is engaged in evangelization and apostolic ministry in 112 nations on six continents. Jesuits
Jesuits
work in education (founding schools, colleges, universities, and seminaries), intellectual research, and cultural pursuits. Jesuits
Jesuits
also give retreats, minister in hospitals and parishes, sponsor direct social ministries, and promote ecumenical dialogue. Ignatius of Loyola, a Basque nobleman from the Pyrenees
Pyrenees
area of northern Spain, founded the society after discerning his spiritual vocation while recovering from a wound sustained in the Battle of Pamplona
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Nebraska
Welcome to NEBRASKAland where the West begins[5]Soil Holdrege seriesSong "Beautiful Nebraska"Other River: Platte RiverState route markerState quarterReleased in 2006Lists of United States
United States
state symbols Nebraska
Nebraska
/nɪˈbræskə/ ( listen) is a state that lies in both the Great Plains
Great Plains
and the Midwestern United States. It is bordered by South Dakota
South Dakota
to the north, Iowa
Iowa
to the east and Missouri
Missouri
to the southeast, both across the Missouri
Missouri
River, Kansas
Kansas
to the south, Colorado
Colorado
to the southwest and Wyoming
Wyoming
to the west. It is the only triply landlocked U.S. state. Nebraska's area is just over 77,220 square miles (200,000 km2) with almost 1.9 million people
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Mayflower
The Mayflower
Mayflower
was an English ship that famously transported the first English Puritans, known today as the Pilgrims, from Plymouth, England to the New World
New World
in 1620.[1] There were 102 passengers, and the crew is estimated to have been about 30, but the exact number is unknown.[2] This voyage has become a cultural icon in the history of the United States, with its story of death and survival in the harsh New England
New England
winter environment
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Cannes Film Festival
The Cannes
Cannes
Festival (/kæn/; French: Festival de Cannes), named until 2002 as the International Film Festival (Festival international du film) and known in English as the Cannes
Cannes
Film Festival, is an annual film festival held in Cannes, France, which previews new films of all genres, including documentaries, from all around the world. Founded in 1946, the invitation-only festival is held annually (usually in May) at the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès.[1] On 1 July 2014, co-founder and former head of French pay-TV operator Canal+, Pierre Lescure, took over as President of the Festival, while Thierry Fremaux
Thierry Fremaux
became the General Delegate. The board of directors also appointed Gilles Jacob as Honorary President of the Festival.[2][3] The 2017 Cannes
Cannes
Film Festival, its 70th anniversary, took place between 17 and 29 May 2017
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Venice Film Festival
The Venice
Venice
Film Festival or Venice
Venice
International Film Festival (Italian: Mostra Internazionale d'Arte Cinematografica della Biennale di Venezia, "International Exhibition of Cinematographic Art of the Venice
Venice
Biennale"), founded in 1932, is the oldest film festival in the world and one of the "Big Three" film festivals alongside the Cannes Film Festival and Berlin International Film Festival.[1][2] The film festival is part of the Venice
Venice
Biennale, which was founded by the Venetian City Council in 1895
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Exploitation Film
An exploitation film is a film that attempts to succeed financially by exploiting current trends, niche genres, or lurid content. Exploitation films are generally low-quality "B movies".[1] Even so, they sometimes attract critical attention and cult followings
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Berlin International Film Festival
The Berlin
Berlin
International Film Festival (German: Internationale Filmfestspiele Berlin), usually called the Berlinale, is a film festival held annually in Berlin, Germany.[1] Founded in West Berlin in 1951,[2] the festival has been held every February since 1978. With around 300,000 tickets sold and 500,000 admissions each year, it has the largest public attendance of any annual film festival.[3] Up to 400 films are shown in several sections across cinematic genres. Around twenty films compete for the festival's top awards, called the Golden Bear
Golden Bear
and several Silver Bears. Since 2001 the director of the festival has been Dieter Kosslick.[4] The European Film Market (EFM), a film trade fair held simultaneously to the Berlinale, is a major industry meeting for the international film circuit.[5] The trade fair serves distributors, film buyers, producers, financiers and co-production agents
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DuMont Television Network
The DuMont Television Network
DuMont Television Network
(also known as the DuMont Network, simply DuMont/Du Mont, or (incorrectly) Dumont[a] /duːmɒnt/) was one of the world's pioneer commercial television networks, rivalling NBC and CBS
CBS
for the distinction of being first overall in the United States. It began operation in 1946.[2] It was owned by DuMont Laboratories, a television equipment and set manufacturer. The network was hindered by the prohibitive cost of broadcasting, by regulations imposed by the Federal Communications Commission
Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) which restricted the company's growth, and even by the company's partner, Paramount Pictures. Despite several innovations in broadcasting and the creation of one of the television's biggest stars of the 1950s (Jackie Gleason), the network never found itself on solid financial ground
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