HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Robe
A ROBE is a loose-fitting outer garment . Unlike garments described as capes or cloaks , robes usually have sleeves . The English word robe derives from Middle English
Middle English
robe ("garment"), borrowed from Old French robe ("booty, spoils"), itself taken from the Frankish word *rouba ("spoils, things stolen, clothes"), and is related to the word rob. CONTENTS * 1 Types * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links TYPESThere are various types of robes, including: * A gown worn as part of the academic regalia of faculty or students , especially for ceremonial occasions, such as a convocations , congregations or graduations . * A gown worn as part of the attire of a judge or barrister . * A wide variety of long, flowing religious dress including pulpit robes and the robes worn by various types of monks . * A gown worn as part of the official dress of a peer or royalty
[...More...]

"Robe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Religious Dress
RELIGIOUS CLOTHING is dress which has a special significance to a faith group . CONTENTS * 1 Christianity
Christianity
* 2 Ecumenicism * 3 Islam
Islam
* 4 Judaism
Judaism
* 5 See also * 6 References CHRISTIANITY Main articles: Vestments and Clerical clothing
Clerical clothing
Il ministrante , by Giacomo di Chirico (1844–1883). Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Latin Rite
Latin Rite
and other Roman Catholic , Eastern Orthodox , Anglicans , Methodists , and Lutheran Churches. Other groups also make use of vestments, but this was a point of controversy in the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
and sometimes since - notably during the Ritualist controversies in England in the 19th century
[...More...]

"Religious Dress" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Students
A STUDENT or PUPIL is a learner or someone who attends an educational institution. In Britain, those attending university are termed "students". In the United States
United States
, and more recently also in Britain, the term "student" is applied to both categories: school and university students. In its widest use, student is used for anyone who is learning , including mid-career adults who are taking vocational education or returning to university. When speaking about learning outside an institution, "student" is also used to refer to someone who is learning a topic or who is "a student of" a certain topic or person. In the widest sense of the word, a student is anyone seeking to learn or to grow by experience, such as a student of the School of Hard Knocks
[...More...]

"Students" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Loanword
A LOANWORD (also LOAN WORD or LOAN-WORD) is a word adopted from one language (the donor language) and incorporated into another language without translation . This is in contrast to cognates , which are words in two or more languages that are similar because they share an etymological origin, and calques , which involve translation
[...More...]

"Loanword" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Faculty (teaching Staff)
FACULTY (in North American usage) or ACADEMICS (in British usage) are the academic staff of a university: professors of various ranks, lecturers , and/or researchers . The term faculty in this sense is most commonly used in this context in the United States
United States
and Canada
Canada
, and generally includes professors of various ranks: adjunct professors , assistant professors , associate professors , and (full) professors , usually tenured (or tenure-track) in terms of their contract of employment. In British English "faculty" usually refers to a university's department, not to the employees. OVERVIEW See also: Academic administration In many universities, the members of the administration (e.g., department chairs, deans , vice presidents, presidents, and librarians ) are also faculty members; many of them begin (and remain) as professors
[...More...]

"Faculty (teaching Staff)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Peerage
A PEERAGE is a legal system historically comprising hereditary titles in various countries, comprising various noble ranks
[...More...]

"Peerage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fictional Character
A CHARACTER (sometimes known as a FICTIONAL CHARACTER) is a person or other being in a narrative work of art (such as a novel , play , television series , or film ). The character may be entirely fictional or based on a real-life person, in which case the distinction of a "fictional" versus "real" character may be made. Derived from the ancient Greek word χαρακτήρ, the English word dates from the Restoration , although it became widely used after its appearance in Tom Jones in 1749. From this, the sense of "a part played by an actor " developed. Character, particularly when enacted by an actor in the theatre or cinema , involves "the illusion of being a human person." In literature, characters guide readers through their stories, helping them to understand plots and ponder themes. Since the end of the 18th century, the phrase "in character" has been used to describe an effective impersonation by an actor
[...More...]

"Fictional Character" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Role-playing Games
A ROLE-PLAYING GAME (sometimes spelled ROLEPLAYING GAME and abbreviated to RPG) is a game in which players assume the roles of characters in a fictional setting . Players take responsibility for acting out these roles within a narrative, either through literal acting or through a process of structured decision-making or character development. Actions taken within many games succeed or fail according to a formal system of rules and guidelines. There are several forms of RPG. The original form, sometimes called the tabletop role-playing game (TRPG), is conducted through discussion, whereas in live action role-playing games (LARP) players physically perform their characters' actions. In both of these forms, an arranger called a game master (GM) usually decides on the rules and setting to be used, acting as referee, while each of the other players plays the role of a single character
[...More...]

"Role-playing Games" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Royal Family
A ROYAL FAMILY is the immediate family of a king or queen regnant , and sometimes his or her extended family. The term IMPERIAL FAMILY appropriately describes the family of an emperor or empress , and the term PAPAL FAMILY describes the family of a pope , while the terms BARONIAL FAMILY, COMITAL FAMILY, DUCAL FAMILY, GRAND DUCAL FAMILY, or PRINCELY FAMILY are more appropriate to describe the relatives of a reigning baron , count , duke , grand duke , or prince . However, in common parlance members of any family which reigns by hereditary right are often referred to as royalty or "royals." It is also customary in some circles to refer to the extended relations of a deposed monarch and his or her descendants as a royal family. A dynasty is sometimes referred to as "the House of ...". As of July 2013, there are 26 active sovereign monarchies in the world who rule or reign over 43 countries in all
[...More...]

"Royal Family" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Convocation
A CONVOCATION (from the Latin
Latin
convocare meaning "to call/come together", a translation of the Greek ἐκκλησία ekklēsia) is a group of people formally assembled for a special purpose, mostly ecclesiastical or academic. Student receiving academic degree from Azim Premji during convocation. Adi Godrej in background. Look up CONVOCATION in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.CONTENTS* 1 Ecclesiastical convocations * 1.1 Convocations of Canterbury and York * 2 University use * 2.1 Graduation
Graduation
* 3 Other uses * 4 Notes * 5 References ECCLESIASTICAL CONVOCATIONSA synodical assembly of a church is at times called "Convocation" CONVOCATIONS OF CANTERBURY AND YORK A cadet of the Royal Military College of Canada
Royal Military College of Canada
plays bagpipes in Currie Hall during the College's fall Convocation
[...More...]

"Convocation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pulpit Robe
The GENEVA GOWN, also called a PULPIT GOWN, PULPIT ROBE, or PREACHING ROBE, is an ecclesiastical garment customarily worn by ordained ministers in the Christian churches that arose out of the historic Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
. It is particularly associated with Protestant churches of the Reformed
Reformed
and Methodist
Methodist
tradition. CONTENTS * 1 Description * 2 Purpose * 3 History * 4 Usage * 5 Trends * 6 References DESCRIPTIONThe gown, analogous to the Western doctoral robe and similar to American judicial attire , is constructed from heavy material, most appropriately of black color, and usually features double-bell sleeves with a cuff (mimicking the cassock once worn under it) and velvet facings (or panels) running over the neck and down both sides of the front enclosure length-wise, mimicking the ecclesiastical tippet once worn over it
[...More...]

"Pulpit Robe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Graduation
GRADUATION is getting a diploma or academic degree or the ceremony that is sometimes associated with it, in which students become graduates . Before the graduation, candidates are referred to as graduands. The date of graduation is often called GRADUATION DAY. The graduation ceremony itself is also called COMMENCEMENT, CONVOCATION or INVOCATION. Normally, the ceremony and name apply to high school and above (the next ascending levels being Associate's, Bachelor's, Master's, and Doctorate). In the United States of America, graduations for elementary school or even Kindergarten have been a fad of recent years. When ceremonies are associated, they usually include a procession of the academic staff and candidates and a valediction . At the college and university level the faculty will usually wear academic dress at the formal ceremonies, as will the trustees and degree candidates
[...More...]

"Graduation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Barrister
A BARRISTER (also known as BARRISTER-AT-LAW or BAR-AT-LAW) is a type of lawyer in common law jurisdictions . Barristers mostly specialise in courtroom advocacy and litigation . Their tasks include taking cases in superior courts and tribunals , drafting legal pleadings , researching the philosophy, hypothesis and history of law, and giving expert legal opinions. Often, barristers are also recognised as legal scholars . Barristers are distinguished from solicitors , who have more direct access to clients, and may do transactional-type legal work. It is mainly barristers who are appointed as judges, and they are rarely hired by clients directly. In some legal systems, including those of Scotland , South Africa
South Africa
, Scandinavia , Pakistan , India , Bangladesh , and the British Crown dependencies of Jersey , Guernsey
Guernsey
and the Isle of Man , the word barrister is also regarded as an honorific title
[...More...]

"Barrister" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Old French
OLD FRENCH (franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France
France
from the 8th century to the 14th century. In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d\'oïl , contrasting with the langue d\'oc or Occitan language in the south of France. The mid-14th century is taken as the transitional period to Middle French , the language of the French Renaissance
French Renaissance
, specifically based on the dialect of the Île-de-France
Île-de-France
region
[...More...]

"Old French" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Old Frankish
FRANKISH (reconstructed Frankish: *Frenkisk), OLD FRANCONIAN or OLD FRANKISH was the West Germanic language spoken by the Franks
Franks
between the 4th and 8th century. The language itself is poorly attested, but it gave rise to numerous loanwords in Old French
Old French
. Old Dutch
Old Dutch
is the term for the Old Franconian dialects spoken in the Low Countries , ie. in present-day Belgium, in the present Netherlands and Western parts of today's Germany until about the 12th century when it evolved into Middle Dutch . During the Merovingian period , Frankish had significant influence on the Romance languages
Romance languages
spoken in Gaul . As a result, many modern French words and placenames (including the country name "France") have a Frankish origin
[...More...]

"Old Frankish" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sleeve
A SLEEVE (O. Eng. slieve, or slyf , a word allied to slip, cf. Dutch sloof ) is the part of a garment that covers the arm , or through which the arm passes or slips. The pattern of the sleeve is one of the characteristics of fashion in dress, varying in every country and period. Various survivals of the early forms of sleeve are still found in the different types of academic or other robes . Where the long hanging sleeve is worn it has, as still in China
China
and Japan
Japan
, been used as a pocket, whence has come the phrase to have up one's sleeve, to have something concealed ready to produce. There are many other proverbial and metaphorical expressions associated with the sleeve, such as to wear one's heart upon one's sleeve, and to laugh in one's sleeve. Sleeve