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Road To Singapore
Road to Singapore
Road to Singapore
is a 1940 American comedy film directed by Victor Schertzinger and starring Bing Crosby, Dorothy Lamour
Dorothy Lamour
and Bob Hope. Based on a story by Harry Hervey, the film is about two playboys trying to forget previous romances in the Colony of Singapore, where they meet a beautiful woman. Distributed by Paramount Pictures, the film marked the debut of the long-running and popular "Road to ..." series of pictures spotlighting the trio, seven in all. The supporting cast features Charles Coburn, Anthony Quinn, and Jerry Colonna
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Edward Gargan
Edward Gargan
Edward Gargan
(July 17, 1902 – February 19, 1964) was an American film and television actor, one of the most prolific bit players in the history of the movies.Contents1 Career 2 Death 3 Partial filmography 4 References 5 External linksCareer[edit] He was born of Irish parents in Brooklyn, New York. He was the elder brother of actor William Gargan,[1] whose birthday July 17 he shared. As soon as he had left college, he went onto the stage and had extensive acting experience gained in plays like My Maryland, Rose Marie, and Good News before going into films. His Broadway credits include Face the Music (1931), Polly of Hollywood (1926) and Black Boy (1926).[2] Many of his appearances were uncredited
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Colony Of Singapore
The Colony of Singapore
Singapore
was a British Crown colony that existed from 1946 until 1963, when Singapore
Singapore
became part of Malaysia. When the Empire of Japan
Empire of Japan
surrendered to the Allies at the end of World War II, the island was handed back to the British in 1945
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Pat-a-cake
"Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man", "Pat-a-cake", "patty-cake" or "pattycake" is one of the oldest and most widely known surviving English nursery rhymes. It has a Roud Folk Song Index
Roud Folk Song Index
number of 6486.[1]Contents1 Verse 2 Origins 3 Tune 4 Game 5 Tennis 6 NotesVerse[edit]Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man. Bake me a cake as fast as you can Pat it, and prick it, and mark it with a "B" And put it in the oven for baby and me!Origins[edit] The earliest recorded version of the rhyme appears in Thomas D'Urfey's play The Campaigners from 1698, where a nurse says to her charges: ...and pat a cake Bakers man, so I will master as I can, and prick it, and prick it, and prick it, and prick it, and prick it, and throw't into the Oven. The next appearance is in Mother Goose's Melody, (c
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Running Gag
A running gag, or running joke, is a literary device that takes the form of an amusing joke or a comical reference and appears repeatedly throughout a work of literature or other form of storytelling. Though they are similar, catchphrases are not considered running gags.[1][2] Running gags can begin with an instance of unintentional humor that is repeated in variations as the joke grows familiar and audiences anticipate reappearances of the gag. The humor in a running gag may derive entirely from how often it is repeated, the (in)appropriateness of the situation in which the gag occurs, or setting up the audience to expect another occurrence of the joke and then substituting something else (bait and switch)
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Robert Emmett O'Connor
Robert Emmett O'Connor
Robert Emmett O'Connor
(March 18, 1885 – September 4, 1962) was an American film actor.[1] He appeared in 204 films between 1919 and 1950. He is probably best known as the warmhearted bootlegger Paddy Ryan in The Public Enemy
The Public Enemy
(1931) and as Detective Sergeant Henderson pursuing the Marx Brothers
Marx Brothers
in A Night at the Opera (1935). He also appeared as Jonesy, (the older Paramount gate guard) in Billy Wilder's 1950 film Sunset Boulevard
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Steve Pendleton
Steve Pendleton (September 16, 1908 – October 3, 1984) was an American film and television actor, often cast in the role of law-enforcement officers.Contents1 Biography 2 Selected filmography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Pendleton was cast in eight episodes in different roles from 1952 to 1957 on The Roy Rogers Show. In 1955, he played the role of Baumer in "Gold of Haunted Mountain" of the CBS
CBS
drama, Brave Eagle. In another 1955 appearance, he was cast as Captain Kenneth McNabb in "The Fight for Texas" of the syndicated western series, Buffalo Bill, Jr. In 1956, he was cast as Bill Mathison in the episode "The Long Weekend" of the then CBS
CBS
military drama, Navy Log
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WTA Finals
The WTA Finals (formerly known as the WTA Tour Championships[2] short: WTA Championships), is a professional tennis tournament played annually at the end of the season for the top-ranked players on the Women's Tennis
Tennis
Association (WTA) tour. The location and number of players has changed since the first edition in 1972. Since 2003 there have been eight singles players divided into two round robin groups, and eight doubles teams. The WTA Finals is unofficially considered the fifth most prestigious event of a season after the four Grand Slam tournaments. It also has the largest prize money and ranking points after the majors. The most successful finals player is Martina Navratilova, who has won 8 singles titles and 13 doubles titles. To qualify for the WTA Finals, WTA players compete throughout the year in over 53 WTA tournaments throughout the world, as well as the four Grand Slam events
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Anthony Quinn
Antonio Rodolfo Quinn Oaxaca (April 21, 1915 – June 3, 2001),[1] more commonly known as Anthony Quinn, was a Mexican-American actor, painter and writer. He starred in numerous critically acclaimed and commercially successful films, including La Strada, The Guns of Navarone, Zorba the Greek, Guns for San Sebastian, Lawrence of Arabia, The Shoes of the Fisherman, The Message, Lion of the Desert, Last Action Hero and A Walk in the Clouds
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Monte Blue
Monte Blue
Monte Blue
(born Gerard Montgomery Bluefeather, January 11, 1887 – February 18, 1963) was a movie actor who began his career as a romantic leading man in the silent film era, and later progressed to character roles.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Partial filmography 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Blue was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. His father was half French and part Cherokee
Cherokee
and Osage Indian.[2] When his father died, his mother could not rear five children alone, so Blue and one of his brothers were admitted to the Indiana
Indiana
Soldiers' and Sailors' Children's Home. He eventually worked his way through Purdue University
Purdue University
in West Lafayette, Indiana. Blue grew to six feet, three inches tall
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Bobby Barber
Bobby Barber
Bobby Barber
(December 18, 1894 – May 24, 1976) was an American actor who appeared in over 100 films. Barber is notable for his work as a foil for Abbott and Costello
Abbott and Costello
on and off screen. Barber was often used by Bud Abbott
Bud Abbott
and Lou Costello
Lou Costello
as a form of "court jester" on the set of their films. It was his job to keep the energy level up with pranks and practical jokes. Sometimes, he even suddenly appeared on camera during a take to break up the cast and crew. In Abbott and Costello
Abbott and Costello
Meet Frankenstein (1948), Costello answers a knock at the door expecting to see large actor Lon Chaney Jr. Instead, the very short Barber walks in wearing a funny hat with a feather
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Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures
Paramount Pictures
Corporation (also known simply as Paramount) is an American film studio based in Hollywood, California, that has been a subsidiary of the American media conglomerate Viacom
Viaco

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Richard Tucker (actor)
Richard Tucker (June 4, 1884 – December 5, 1942) was an American actor. Biography[edit] Tucker was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1884. Appearing in 266 films between 1911 and 1940, he was the first official member of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and a founding member of SAG's Board of Directors. Tucker died in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles
Woodland Hills, Los Angeles
from a heart attack
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Paul Weatherwax
Paul John Weatherwax (July 8, 1900[1][2] – September 13, 1960[3]) was an American film editor, and two-time winner of the Academy Award for Best Film Editing. Weatherwax was born in Sturgis, Michigan, began his editing career in silent films in 1928, and over his career edited about 85 films
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William Mellor
William Mellor (1888–1942) was a left-wing British journalist. A Guild Socialist
Guild Socialist
during the 1910s, Mellor worked closely with G. D. H. Cole, founding the National Guilds League
National Guilds League
with him in 1915.[1] He joined the Daily Herald in 1913 as a journalist, and was imprisoned during the First World War
First World War
as a conscientious objector, returning to the Herald on his release.[2] He was a founder-member of the Communist Party of Great Britain in 1920, but resigned in 1924. He became editor of the Herald in 1926, succeeding George Lansbury
George Lansbury
when the Trades Union Congress took over the paper, and was fired in 1930 soon after Odhams Press
Odhams Press
took half-ownership with the TUC
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Fred MacMurray
Frederick Martin MacMurray (August 30, 1908 – November 5, 1991) was an American actor who appeared in more than 100 movies and a successful television series during a career that spanned nearly a half-century, from 1930 to the 1970s. MacMurray is best known for his role in the 1944 film noir Double Indemnity directed by Billy Wilder, in which he starred with Barbara Stanwyck. Later in his career, he performed in numerous Disney films, including The Absent-Minded Professor
The Absent-Minded Professor
and The Shaggy Dog
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