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River Sheppey
The River Sheppey
River Sheppey
has its source in a group of springs west of the village of Doulting, near Shepton Mallet
Shepton Mallet
in Somerset, England. It flows through the wetlands to the north of the Polden Hills
Polden Hills
and ultimately joins the River Brue.Contents1 Route 2 Ecology 3 History 4 ReferencesRoute[edit] From Doulting, the Sheppey flows south west to Charlton, where parts of its course have been culverted. The river has been diverted underground for much, though not all, of its passage through Shepton Mallet.[1] It reappears at Darshill and then flows south west through Croscombe
Croscombe
to Dinder
Dinder
where it flows through the grounds of Dinder
Dinder
House which was built in 1801 and under a bridge which pre-dates the house.[2] It then continues west past Dulcote, Woodford and Coxley
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Ceremonial Counties Of England
The ceremonial counties,[2] also referred to as the lieutenancy areas of England,[3] are areas of England
England
to which a Lord Lieutenant
Lord Lieutenant
is appointed. Legally the areas in England, as well as in Wales and Scotland, are defined by the Lieutenancies Act 1997
Lieutenancies Act 1997
as counties and areas for the purposes of the lieutenancies in Great Britain, in contrast to the areas used for local government
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Curry And Hay Moors
Curry and Hay Moors
Curry and Hay Moors
(grid reference ST323273) is a 472.8 hectare (1168.1 acre) biological Site of Special Scientific Interest
Site of Special Scientific Interest
in Somerset, notified in 1992. Curry and Hay Moors
Curry and Hay Moors
form part of the complex of grazing marshes known as the Somerset
Somerset
Levels and Moors. The low-lying site is situated adjacent to the River Tone
River Tone
which annually overtops, flooding the fields in winter. Soils are predominantly alluvial clays overlying Altcar series peats. The flora and fauna of the ditches and rhynes is of national importance. Over 70 aquatic and bankside vascular plants have been recorded including frogbit (Hydrocharis morsus-ranae), flowering rush (Butomus umbellatus), wood club-rush (Scirpus sylvaticus) and lesser water-plantain (Baldellia ranunculoides)
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Environment Agency
The Environment Agency
Environment Agency
(EA) is a non-departmental public body, established in 1995 and sponsored by the United Kingdom government's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
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Westhay
Westhay
Westhay
is a village in Somerset, England. It is situated in the parish of Meare, 4 miles (6.4 km) north west of Glastonbury
Glastonbury
on the Somerset
Somerset
Levels, in the Mendip
Mendip
district. The name means 'The west field that is enclosed by hedges' from the Old English
Old English
west and haga. The 'g' in haga is silent.[1] Westhay
Westhay
is a marshland village on the River Brue
River Brue
in typical Somerset rhyne country, standing on the site of pre-historic lake dwellings. The site of the lake-village is marked by groups of mounds. Nearby was the Peat Moors Centre
Peat Moors Centre
which closed down in the autumn of 2009
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Public House
A pub, or public house, is an establishment licensed to sell alcoholic drinks, which traditionally include beer (such as ale) and cider. It is a relaxed, social drinking establishment and a prominent part of British,[1] Irish,[2] Breton, New Zealand, Canadian, South African and Australian cultures.[3] In many places, especially in villages, a pub is the focal point of the community. In his 17th-century diary Samuel Pepys described the pub as "the heart of England".[4] Pubs can be traced back to Roman taverns,[5] through the Anglo-Saxon alehouse to the development of the tied house system in the 19th century. In 1393, King Richard II of England
King Richard II of England
introduced legislation that pubs had to display a sign outdoors to make them easily visible for passing ale tasters, who would assess the quality of ale sold.[6] Most pubs focus on offering beers, ales and similar drinks. As well, pubs often sell wines, spirits, and soft drinks, meals and snacks
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Woodford, Somerset
Nettlecombe is a civil parish in the English county of Somerset. The parish covers a rural area below the Brendon Hills, comprising the small hamlets of Woodford, Yarde and Torre together with more isolated individual farms and homes. In 2011, the parish had a population of 174.[1][2] The village takes its name from Nettlecombe Court, an Elizabethan manor house which was once the manorial centre of the area.[2] There are no shops or other services within the parish, which is instead served by the nearby village of Williton.[2]Contents1 History 2 Governance 3 Religious sites 4 Climate 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The manor was held before the Norman Conquest by Godwin, son of King Harold, and subsequently was the property of the crown. In 1160 it was granted to Hugh de Ralph and has never been sold since
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North Moor
North Moor
North Moor
(grid reference ST325305) is a 676.3 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest
Site of Special Scientific Interest
near Lyng in Somerset, notified in 1986. North Moor
North Moor
is a nationally important grazing marsh and ditch system on the Somerset
Somerset
Levels and Moors. A range of neutral grassland types supporting common and scarce plants has developed mainly due to variations in soils and management practices. Aquatic plant communities are exceptionally diverse with good populations of nationally scarce species
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Bath, Somerset
Bath is the largest city in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England, known for its Roman-built baths. In 2011, the population was 88,859.[2] Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London
London
and 11 miles (18 km) south-east of Bristol. The city became a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
in 1987. The city became a spa with the Latin
Latin
name Aquae Sulis
Aquae Sulis
("the waters of Sulis") c.60  AD  when the Romans built baths and a temple in the valley of the River Avon, although hot springs were known even before then. Bath Abbey
Bath Abbey
was founded in the 7th century and became a religious centre; the building was rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries. In the 17th century, claims were made for the curative properties of water from the springs, and Bath became popular as a spa town in the Georgian era
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Bridgwater
Bridgwater
Bridgwater
is a large historic market town and civil parish in Somerset, England. Its population currently stands at around 35,886 as of 2011.[1] Bridgwater
Bridgwater
is at the edge of the Somerset
Somerset
Levels, in level and well-wooded country. The town lies along both sides of the River Parrett, and has been a major in-land port and trading centre since the industrial revolution. Most of its industrial bases still stand today. Its larger neighbour Taunton, is linked to Bridgwater
Bridgwater
via a canal, the M5 motorway
M5 motorway
and the GWR railway line. Historically, the town had a politically radical tendency. The Battle of Sedgemoor, where the Monmouth Rebellion
Monmouth Rebellion
was finally crushed in 1685, was fought nearby
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Bruton
Bruton
Bruton
(/ˈbruːtən/ BROO-tən) is a small town, electoral ward, and civil parish in Somerset, England, situated on the River Brue
River Brue
along the A359 between Frome
Frome
and Yeovil. It is 7 miles (11 km) south-east of Shepton Mallet, just south of Snakelake Hill and Coombe Hill, 10 miles (16 km) north-west of Gillingham and 12 miles (19 km) south-west of Frome
Frome
in the South Somerset
Somerset
district. The town and electoral ward have a population of 2,907.[1] The parish includes the hamlets of Wyke Champflower and Redlynch. Bruton
Bruton
has a museum dedicated to the display of items from Bruton's past from the Jurassic geology up to the present day
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Burnham-on-Sea
Burnham-on-Sea
Burnham-on-Sea
is a large seaside town in Somerset, England, at the mouth of the River Parrett, upon Bridgwater
Bridgwater
Bay. Burnham was a small fishing village until the late 18th century, when it began to grow because of its popularity as a seaside resort. It forms part of the parish of Burnham-on-Sea and Highbridge
Burnham-on-Sea and Highbridge
and shares a town council with its neighbouring market town of Highbridge. According to the 2011 census the population of the parish (i.e
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