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River Mouth
A river mouth is the part of a river where the river flows into another river, a lake, a reservoir, a sea, or an ocean.[citation needed]Contents1 Water motion 2 Landforms 3 Cultural influence 4 See also 5 ReferencesWater motion[edit] The water from a river can enter the receiving body in a variety of different ways.[1] The motion of the river mainly depends on the relative density of the river compared to the receiving water and any ambient motion in the receiving water, such as tides or seiches.[citation needed] If the river water is denser than the surface of the receiving water, the river water will plunge below the surface at the plunge curve
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Spit (landform)
A spit or sandspit is a deposition bar or beach landform off coasts or lake shores. It develops in places where re-entrance occurs, such as at a cove's headlands, by the process of longshore drift by longshore currents. The drift occurs due to waves meeting the beach at an oblique angle, moving sediment down the beach in a zigzag pattern. This is complemented by longshore currents, which further transport sediment through the water alongside the beach. These currents are caused by the same waves that cause the drift.[1]Contents1 Hydrology and geology 2 Notable spits around the world 3 Human settlement patterns 4 See also 5 ReferencesHydrology and geology[edit] Where the direction of the shore inland re-enters, or changes direction, for example at a headland, the longshore current spreads out or dissipates. No longer able to carry the full load, much of the sediment is dropped. This is called deposition
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Aber And Inver (placename Elements)
Inver
Inver
(Irish: Inbhear, meaning "estuary") is a village in County Donegal, Ireland. It lies on the N56 National secondary road
National secondary road
midway between Killybegs
Killybegs
to the west and Donegal
Donegal
Town to the east. It is also a civil parish in the historic barony of Banagh.[1] Inver
Inver
is sometimes known as the hidden jewel of the northwest. Inver was an important whaling post in Ireland. There was a large whaling station and fleet in the Port of Inver
Inver
which lies 2 km from Inver Village. Thomas Nesbitt was the head of this investment. He also increased productivity by inventing the harpoon gun. The ruins of the old whaling station still remain in the port but has eroded and deteriorated to rubble
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
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River Yare
The River
River
Yare is a river in the English county of Norfolk. In its lower reaches it is one of the principal navigable waterways of The Broads and connects with the rest of the network. The river rises south of Dereham
Dereham
to the west to the village of Shipdham. Above its confluence with a tributary stream from Garvestone it is known as the Blackwater River.[1] From there it flows in a generally eastward direction passing Barnham Broom
Barnham Broom
and is joined by the River Tiffey
River Tiffey
before reaching Bawburgh. It then skirts the southern fringes of the city of Norwich, passing through Colney, Cringleford, Lakenham and Trowse
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River Sid
The River Sid
River Sid
is a minor river in East Devon. It flows for 6.5 miles (10.5 km) southwards from a source in Crowpits Covert (OSGB36 Grid reference SY138963) at a height of 206 metres above sea level.[1] The source is at the head of a goyle or small ravine. The underlying geology is impermeable silty mudstones and sandstones of the Triassic
Triassic
Keuper marl, overlain with permeable Greensand
Greensand
and clay-with-flints. The junction between the Greensand
Greensand
and Keuper Marl forms a spring line. The river flows through Sidbury
Sidbury
and Sidford
Sidford
to Sidmouth
Sidmouth
and is fed by springs flowing from East Hill and water from the Roncombe Stream, the Snod Brook and the Woolbrook
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River Plym
The River Plym is a river in Devon, England. It runs from Dartmoor in the centre of the county southwest to meet the River Meavy, then south towards Plymouth Sound. The river is popular with canoeists and the Plym Valley Railway runs alongside a section of the river.Contents1 Course 2 Nomenclature 3 History 4 Leisure 5 See also 6 ReferencesCourse[edit] The river's source is around 450 metres (1,480 ft) above sea level on Dartmoor, in an upland marshy area called Plym Head.[1][2] From the upper reaches, which contain antiquities and mining remains, the river flows roughly southwest past clay workings at Shaugh Prior to Dewerstone, where it meets the River Meavy. The course then changes to run southwards, between Plymouth and Plympton
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National Diet Library
The National Diet
National Diet
Library (NDL) (国立国会図書館, Kokuritsu Kokkai Toshokan) is the national library of Japan
Japan
and among the largest libraries in the world. It was established in 1948 for the purpose of assisting members of the National Diet
National Diet
of Japan
Japan
(国会, Kokkai) in researching matters of public policy
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Liman (landform)
Liman defined in Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Russian (Лиман) and Romanian (liman) the enlarged estuaries formed as lagoons at the widening mouth of one or several rivers, where flow is blocked by a bar of sediments, as the Dniester Liman
Dniester Liman
or the Razelm liman; a liman can be maritime (the bar being created by the current of a sea) or fluvial (the bar being created by the flow of a bigger river at the confluence).[1] The term is usually used in place of the more universal delta, with its implication of landform, to describe wet estuaries in the
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Sediment
Sediment
Sediment
is a naturally occurring material that is broken down by processes of weathering and erosion, and is subsequently transported by the action of wind, water, or ice, and/or by the force of gravity acting on the particles. For example, sand and silt can be carried in suspension in river water and on reaching the sea be deposited by sedimentation and if buried, may eventually become sandstone and siltstone (sedimentary rocks). Sediments are most often transported by water (fluvial processes), but also wind (aeolian processes) and glaciers. Beach sands and river channel deposits are examples of fluvial transport and deposition, though sediment also often settles out of slow-moving or standing water in lakes and oceans. Desert sand dunes and loess are examples of aeolian transport and deposition
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Diffuse
Diffusion
Diffusion
is the net movement of molecules or atoms from a region of high concentration (or high chemical potential) to a region of low concentration (or low chemical potential) as a result of random motion of the molecules or atoms. Diffusion
Diffusion
is driven by a gradient in chemical potential of the diffusing species. A gradient is the change in the value of a quantity e.g. concentration, pressure, or temperature with the change in another variable, usually distance
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Advection
In the field of physics, engineering, and earth sciences, advection is the transport of a substance by bulk motion. The properties of that substance are carried with it. Generally the majority of the advected substance is a fluid. The properties that are carried with the advected substance are conserved properties such as energy. An example of advection is the transport of pollutants or silt in a river by bulk water flow downstream. Another commonly advected quantity is energy or enthalpy. Here the fluid may be any material that contains thermal energy, such as water or air. In general, any substance or conserved, extensive quantity can be advected by a fluid that can hold or contain the quantity or substance. During advection, a fluid transports some conserved quantity or material via bulk motion
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Seiches
A seiche (/ˈseɪʃ/ SAYSH) is a standing wave in an enclosed or partially enclosed body of water. Seiches and seiche-related phenomena have been observed on lakes, reservoirs, swimming pools, bays, harbours and seas
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Tides
Tides are the rise and fall of sea levels caused by the combined effects of the gravitational forces exerted by the Moon
Moon
and the Sun and the rotation of Earth. Tide
Tide
tables can be used to find the predicted times and amplitude (or "tidal range") of tides at any given locale. The predictions are influenced by many factors including the alignment of the Sun
Sun
and Moon, the phase and amplitude of the tide (pattern of tides in the deep ocean), the amphidromic systems of the oceans, and the shape of the coastline and near-shore bathymetry (see Timing). They are however only predictions, the actual time and height of the tide is affected by wind and atmospheric pressure. Some shorelines experience a semi-diurnal tide—two nearly equal high and low tides each day. Other locations experience a diurnal tide—only one high and low tide each day
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