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Ordinance (Christianity)
Ordinance may refer to: Law[edit] Ordinance (Belgium), a law adopted by the Brussels Parliament or the Common Community Commission Ordinance (India) Ordinance (university), a particular class of internal legislation in a United Kingdom university Act of Parliament, in some jurisdictions, such as England when the parliament operated without regal sanctionRoyal ordinance, see DecreeBy-law, a rule established by an organization to
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Jew
Jews
Jews
(Hebrew: יְהוּדִים‬ ISO 259-3 Yehudim, Israeli pronunciation [jehuˈdim]) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group[12] and a nation[13][14][15] originating from the Israelites,[16][17][18] or Hebrews,[19][20] of the Ancient Near East. Jewish ethnicity, nationhood, and religion are strongly interrelated,[21] as
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World Methodist Council
The World Methodist Council
World Methodist Council
(WMC), founded in 1881, is a consultative body and association of churches in the Methodist tradition
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Anglican Communion
The Anglican
Anglican
Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members,[1][2] founded in 1867 in London, England. It consists of the Church of England
England
and national and regional Anglican episcopal polities in full communion with it,[3] with traditional origins of their doctrines summarised in the Thirty-nine Articles (1571). Archbishop
Archbishop
Justin Welby
Justin Welby
of Canterbury
Canterbury
acts as a focus of unity, recognised as primus inter pares ("first among equals"), but does not exercise authority in the provinces outside England. The Anglican
Anglican
Communion was founded at the Lambeth Conference
Lambeth Conference
in 1867 in London, England, under the leadership of Charles Longley, Archbishop
Archbishop
of Canterbury
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39 Articles
The Thirty-nine Articles
Thirty-nine Articles
of Religion (commonly abbreviated as the Thirty-nine Articles
Thirty-nine Articles
or the XXXIX Articles) are the historically defining statements of doctrines and practices of the Church of England with respect to the controversies of the English Reformation. The Thirty-nine Articles
Thirty-nine Articles
form part of the Book of Common Prayer
Book of Common Prayer
used by both the Church of England
Church of England
and the Episcopal Church. Several versions are available online. When Henry VIII
Henry VIII
broke with the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
and was excommunicated, he formed a new Church of England, which would be headed by the monarch (himself) rather than the pope
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Moravian Church
The Moravian Church, formally named the Unitas Fratrum
Unitas Fratrum
( Latin
Latin
for "Unity of the Brethren"),[3][4][5] in German known as [Herrnhuter] Brüdergemeine[6] (meaning "Brethren's Congregation from Herrnhut", the place of the Church's renewal in the 18th century), is one of the oldest
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Luther's Small Catechism
Luther's Small Catechism
Catechism
(German: Der Kleine Katechismus) is a catechism written by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and published in 1529 for the training of children. Luther's Small Catechism
Catechism
reviews the Ten Commandments, the Apostles' Creed, the Lord's Prayer, the Sacrament of Holy Baptism, the Office of the Keys and Confession and the Sacrament of the Eucharist. It is included in the Book of Concord
Book of Concord
as an authoritative statement of what Lutherans believe. The Small Catechism is widely used today in Lutheran churches as part of youth education and Confirmation. It was mandatory for confirmands in the Church of Sweden until the 1960s.[1]See also[edit] Lutheranism
Lutheranism
portal Luther's Large CatechismReferences[edit]^ "Lilla katekesen" (in Swedish). Church of Sweden
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Pledge Of Allegiance
The Pledge of Allegiance of the United States
United States
is an expression of allegiance to the Flag of the United States
United States
and the republic of the United States
United States
of America. It was originally composed by Captain George Thatcher Balch,[3][4][5] a Union Army Officer during the Civil War and later a teacher of patriotism in New York City schools. The form of the pledge used today was largely devised by Francis Bellamy in 1892, and formally adopted by Congress as the pledge in 1942.[6] The official name of The Pledge of Allegiance was adopted in 1945
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Muslim
65–75% Sunni
Sunni
Islam[22][note 1] 10–13% Shia
Shia
Islam[22] 15–20% Non-denominational Islam[23] ~1% Ahmadiyya[24] ~1% Other Muslim
Muslim
traditions, e.g
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Pilgrimage
A pilgrimage is a journey or search of moral or spiritual significance. Typically, it is a journey to a shrine or other location of importance to a person's beliefs and faith, although sometimes it can be a metaphorical journey into someone's own beliefs. Many religions attach spiritual importance to particular places: the place of birth or death of founders or saints, or to the place of their "calling" or spiritual awakening, or of their connection (visual or verbal) with the divine, to locations where miracles were performed or witnessed, or locations where a deity is said to live or be "housed", or any site that is seen to have special spiritual powers. Such sites may be commemorated with shrines or temples that devotees are encouraged to visit for their own spiritual benefit: to be healed or have questions answered or to achieve some other spiritual benefit. A person who makes such a journey is called a pilgrim
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Synagogue
A synagogue, also spelled synagog (pronounced /ˈsɪnəɡɒɡ/; from Greek συναγωγή, synagogē, 'assembly', Hebrew: בית כנסת‬ bet kenesset, 'house of assembly' or בית תפילה‬ bet tefila, "house of prayer", Yiddish: שול shul, Ladino: אסנוגה esnoga or קהל kahal), is a Jewish house of prayer. Synagogues have a large place for prayer (the main sanctuary), and may also have smaller rooms for study and sometimes a social hall and offices. Some have a separate room for Torah
Torah
study, called the בית מדרש‬ beth midrash "house of study". Synagogues are consecrated spaces used for the purpose of prayer, Tanakh
Tanakh
(the entire Hebrew Bible, including the Torah) reading, study and assembly; however, a synagogue is not necessary for worship. Halakha holds that communal Jewish worship can be carried out wherever ten Jews
Jews
(a minyan) assemble
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Festival
A festival is an event ordinarily celebrated by a community and centering on some characteristic aspect of that community and its religion or cultures. It is often marked as a local or national holiday, mela, or eid. Next to religion and folklore, a significant origin is agricultural. Food is such a vital resource that many festivals are associated with harvest time. Religious commemoration and thanksgiving for good harvests are blended in events that take place in autumn, such as Halloween
Halloween
in the northern hemisphere and Easter
Easter
in the southern. Festivals often serve to fulfill specific communal purposes, especially in regard to commemoration or thanksgiving. The celebrations offer a sense of belonging for religious, social, or geographical groups, contributing to group cohesiveness
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Worship
Worship
Worship
is an act of religious devotion usually directed towards a deity
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Religious
There is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] It may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophesies, ethics, or organizations, that relate humanity to the supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual. Different religions may or may not contain various elements ranging from the divine,[3] sacred things,[4] faith,[5] a supernatural being or supernatural beings[6] or "some sort of ultimacy and transcendence that will provide norms and power for the rest of life".[7] Religious practices may include rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration (of deities), sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trances, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service, or other aspects of human culture. Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a
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Marriage
Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a socially or ritually recognised union between spouses that establishes rights and obligations between those spouses, as well as between them and any resulting biological or adopted children and affinity (in-laws and other family through marriage).[1] The definition of marriage varies around the world not only between cultures and between religions, but also throughout the history of any given culture and religion, evolving to both expand and constrict in who and what is encompassed, but typically it is principally an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually sexual, are acknowledged or sanctioned. In some cultures, marriage is recommended or considered to be compulsory before pursuing any sexual activity. When defined broadly, marriage is considered a cultural universal
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