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Rick Wamsley
Richard James Wamsley (born May 25, 1959) is a Canadian retired professional ice hockey goaltender who played in the National Hockey League for the Montreal Canadiens, St. Louis Blues, Calgary Flames
Calgary Flames
and Toronto Maple Leafs. He was the goaltending coach for the NHL's Ottawa Senators until his firing by new general manager Pierre Dorion on April 12, 2016.[1] Drafted by the Montreal Canadiens
Montreal Canadiens
in 1979, Wamsley played with the Nova Scotia Voyageurs before being called up to the big team. He spent three successful seasons in Montreal before being shipped to St. Louis in exchange for the draft picks which the Canadiens would ultimately use to select future players Shayne Corson
Shayne Corson
and Stéphane Richer. Wamsley and Denis Herron
Denis Herron
shared the William M. Jennings Trophy
William M

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1986–87 NHL Season
The 1986–87 NHL season
1986–87 NHL season
was the 70th season of the National Hockey League
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1976–77 OMJHL Season
The 1976–77 OMJHL season was the third season of the Ontario Major Junior Hockey League. The St. Catharines Black Hawks moved to Niagara Falls, Ontario, becoming the Flyers. Their owner Hap Emms using the name of his former team. The Hamilton Fincups then moved to the vacant Jack Gatecliff Arena in St. Catharines, Ontario after the ice-making machine at the ancient Hamilton Forum broke down irreparably a month before the season began. Twelve teams each played 66 games. The Ottawa 67's won the J. Ross Robertson Cup, defeating the London Knights.Contents1 Regular season1.1 Standings 1.2 Scoring leaders2 Playoffs2.1 First round 2.2 Quarterfinals 2.3 Semifinals 2.4 J. Ross Robertson Cup3 Awards 4 See also 5 ReferencesRegular season[edit] Standings[edit]Leyden Division GP W L T Pts GF GAy-Ottawa 67's 66 38 23 5 81 348 288x-Sudbury Wolves 66 38 24 4 80 385 290x-Kingston Canadians 66 32 24 10 74 295 259x-Peterborough Petes 66 31 28 7 69 307 309x-Sault Ste
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Columbus Blue Jackets
The Columbus Blue Jackets
Columbus Blue Jackets
are a professional ice hockey team based in Columbus, Ohio. They are members of the Metropolitan Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League
National Hockey League
(NHL). The Blue Jackets were founded as an expansion team in 2000.[4] The team qualified for the Stanley Cup
Stanley Cup
playoffs for the first time in 2009.[5] The Blue Jackets' name and logos are inspired by Ohio's Civil War history. The Blue Jackets play their home games at Nationwide Arena
Nationwide Arena
in downtown Columbus, which opened in 2000
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Pat Burns
Patrick John Joseph Burns[1] (April 4, 1952 – November 19, 2010) was a National Hockey League
National Hockey League
head coach. Over 14 seasons between 1988 and 2004, he coached in 1,019 games with the Montreal Canadiens, Toronto Maple Leafs, Boston Bruins, and New Jersey Devils. Burns retired in 2005 after being diagnosed with recurring cancer, which eventually claimed his life five years later. In 2014, he was posthumously inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.[2]Contents1 Professional career 2 Personal life 3 Death 4 Legacy 5 Coaching record 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksProfessional career[edit] As a child, Burns had always wanted to play on a NHL
NHL
team, and win the Stanley Cup. Once he realized he didn't possess the skill set to make it professionally, Burns became a police officer
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Regular Season
In an organized sports league, a typical season is the portion of one year in which regulated games of the sport are in session: for example, in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
the season lasts approximately from April to October.[1] In other team sports, like association football or basketball, it is generally from August or September to May although in some countries - such as Northern Europe
Europe
or East Asia - the season starts in the spring and finishes in autumn, mainly due to weather conditions encountered during the winter. A year can often be broken up into several distinct sections (sometimes themselves called seasons)
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Playoffs
The playoffs, play-offs, postseason and/or finals of a sports league are a competition played after the regular season by the top competitors to determine the league champion or a similar accolade. Depending on the league, the playoffs may be either a single game, a series of games, or a tournament, and may use a single-elimination system or one of several other different playoff formats. Playoff, in regard to international fixtures, is to qualify or progress to the next round of a competition or tournament. In team sports in the U.S. and Canada, the vast distances and consequent burdens on cross-country travel have led to regional divisions of teams. Generally, during the regular season, teams play more games in their division than outside it, but the league's best teams might not play against each other in the regular season. Therefore, in the postseason a playoff series is organized
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Season (sports)
In an organized sports league, a typical season is the portion of one year in which regulated games of the sport are in session: for example, in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
the season lasts approximately from April to October.[1] In other team sports, like association football or basketball, it is generally from August or September to May although in some countries - such as Northern Europe
Europe
or East Asia - the season starts in the spring and finishes in autumn, mainly due to weather conditions encountered during the winter. A year can often be broken up into several distinct sections (sometimes themselves called seasons)
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Goals Against Average
Goals Against Average (GAA) is a statistic used in field hockey, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer and water polo that is the mean of goals allowed per game by a goaltender. GAA is analogous to a baseball pitcher's earned run average (ERA). In Japanese, the same translation (防御率) is used for both GAA and ERA, because of this. For ice hockey, it is calculated per game by dividing the number of goals against by the number of minutes played in the game then multiplied by 60. For a season, divide the total number of goals against by the result of the total number of minutes played (also known as time on ice) multiplied by 60
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Save Percentage
Save percentage (often known by such symbols as SV%, SVS%, SVP, PCT) is a statistic in many sports that track saves as a statistic. In ice hockey and lacrosse statistic that represents the percentage of shots on goal a goaltender stops. It is calculated by dividing the number of saves by the total number of shots on goal. Although the statistic is called "save percentage", it is given as a decimal (in the same way as an on-base percentage in baseball). Thus, .933 means a goaltender saved 93.3 percent of all shots they faced. National Hockey League
National Hockey League
goaltenders typically have a save percentage above .900, and National Lacrosse
Lacrosse
League goaltenders typically have a save percentage above .750. Save percentage applies in an analogous way to goalkeepers in association football. Save percentage in baseball applies to relief pitchers, particularly closers
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Ontario Hockey League
The Ontario
Ontario
Hockey League (OHL) is one of the three major junior ice hockey leagues which constitute the Canadian Hockey League. The league is for players aged 16–21. There are currently 20 teams in the OHL; seventeen in Ontario, two in Michigan, and one in Pennsylvania. The league was founded in 1980, when its predecessor league, the Ontario
Ontario
Major Junior Hockey League formally split away from the Ontario
Ontario
Hockey Association, joining the Canadian Major Junior Hockey League and its direct affiliation with Hockey Canada. The OHL traces its history of Junior A hockey back to 1933 with the partition of Junior A and B. In 1970, the OHA Junior A League was one of five Junior A leagues operating in Ontario. The OHA was promoted to Tier I Junior A for the 1970–71 season and took up the name Ontario
Ontario
Major Junior Hockey League
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Canada
Coordinates: 60°N 95°W / 60°N 95°W / 60; -95CanadaFlagMotto: A Mari Usque Ad Mare  (Latin) (English: "From Sea to Sea")Anthem: "O Canada"Royal anthem: "God Save the Queen"[1]Capital Ottawa 45°24′N 75°40′W / 45.400°N 75.667°W / 45.400; -75.667Largest city TorontoOfficial languagesEnglish FrenchEthnic groupsList of ethnicities74.3% European 14.5% Asian 5.1% Indigenous 3.4% Caribbean and Latin American 2.9% African 0.2% Oceanian[2]ReligionList of religions67.2% Christianity 23.9% Non-religious 3.2% Islam 1.5% Hinduism 1.4% Sikhism 1.1% Buddhism 1.0% Judaism 0.6% Other -[3]Demonym CanadianGovernment Federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy[4]• MonarchElizabeth II• Governor GeneralJulie Payette• Prime MinisterJustin Trudeau• Chie
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1977–78 OMJHL Season
The 1977–78 OMJHL season was the fourth season of the Ontario Major Junior Hockey League. The Fincups franchise moved back from St. Catharines to Hamilton after a temporary year away from the city due to lack of a suitable arena. The league featured a wealth of scoring talent during the season, with two players recording the league's highest single season point totals. Third season veteran Bobby Smith, edged 17-year-old rookie Wayne Gretzky
Wayne Gretzky
for the Eddie Powers Memorial Trophy, scoring 192 points. Twelve teams each played 68 games. The Peterborough Petes
Peterborough Petes
won the J. Ross Robertson Cup, defeating the Hamilton Fincups.Contents1 Regular season1.1 Standings 1.2 Scoring leaders2 Playoffs2.1 First round 2.2 Quarterfinals 2.3 Semifinals 2.4 J
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1978–79 OMJHL Season
The 1978–79 OMJHL season was the fifth season of the Ontario Major Junior Hockey League. The Hamilton Fincups
Hamilton Fincups
moved to Brantford, Ontario, becoming the Alexanders. Twelve teams each played 68 games. The Peterborough Petes
Peterborough Petes
won the J. Ross Robertson Cup, defeating the Niagara Falls Flyers.Contents1 Regular season1.1 Standings 1.2 Scoring leaders2 Playoffs2.1 First round 2.2 Leyden division quarterfinals 2.3 Semifinals 2.4 J. Ross Robertson Cup3 Awards 4 See also 5 ReferencesRegular season[edit] Standings[edit]Leyden Division GP W L T Pts GF GAy-Peterborough Petes 68 46 19 3 95 341 245x-Sudbury Wolves 68 40 27 1 81 397 361x-Oshawa Generals 68 37 30 1 75 367 326x-Ottawa 67's 68 30 38 0 60 319 344x-Kingston Canadians 68 26 38 4 56 265 306Sault Ste
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1979–80 AHL Season
The 1979–80 AHL season was the 44th season of the American Hockey League. Ten teams were scheduled to play 80 games each. The New Haven Nighthawks finished first overall in the regular season
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American Hockey League
The American Hockey League
American Hockey League
(AHL) is a 30-team professional ice hockey league based in the United States and Canada that serves as the primary developmental league for the National Hockey League
National Hockey League
(NHL).[2] Since the 2010–11 season, every team in the league has an affiliation agreement with one NHL team. When NHL teams do not have an AHL affiliate, players are assigned to AHL teams affiliated with other NHL teams. Twenty-six AHL teams are located in the United States and the remaining four are in Canada. The league offices are located in Springfield, Massachusetts, and its current president is David Andrews. In general, a player must be at least 20 years of age to play in the AHL or not currently be beholden to a junior ice hockey team
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