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Richard Westmacott (the Younger)
Richard Westmacott
Richard Westmacott
(the younger) RA (1799 – 19 April 1872) – also sometimes described as Richard Westmacott
Richard Westmacott
III (to distinguish him from his father and grandfather – both sculptors bearing the same name) – was a prominent English sculptor of the early and mid-19th century. Life[edit] Born in London, he was the son of Sir Richard Westmacott (1775–1856), and followed closely in his father's footsteps: studying at the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
(from 1818), being elected as an Associate of the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
(in 1838) and a full Academician (in 1849), and then succeeding his father to serve as the RA's professor of sculpture (1857–68) – the only time an RA professorship passed from father to son. Among his most notable works is the pediment of the Royal Exchange in the City of London
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Davies Gilbert
Davies Gilbert
Davies Gilbert
PRS (born Davies Giddy, 6 March 1767 – 24 December 1839) was a Cornish engineer, author, and politician. He was elected to the Royal Society
Royal Society
on 17 November 1791 and served as President of the Royal Society
Royal Society
from 1827 to 1830.[1] He changed his name to Gilbert in 1817.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Marriage and family 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Davies Giddy was born on 6 March 1767, the second child of three, to the Reverend Edward Giddy, curate of St Erth
St Erth
church, and Catherine Davies, daughter of Henry Davies of Tredrea, St Erth
St Erth
in Cornwall
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Cardinal Newman
John Henry Newman, Cong. Orat. (21 February 1801 – 11 August 1890) was a poet and theologian, first an Anglican priest and later a Catholic priest and cardinal, who was an important and controversial figure in the religious history of England in the 19th century. He was known nationally by the mid-1830s.[5] Originally an evangelical Oxford University
Oxford University
academic and priest in the Church of England, Newman then became drawn to the high-church tradition of Anglicanism. He became known as a leader of, and an able polemicist for, the Oxford
Oxford
Movement, an influential and controversial grouping of Anglicans who wished to return to the Church of England many Catholic beliefs and liturgical rituals from before the English Reformation. In this the movement had some success
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Pediment
A pediment is an architectural element found particularly in classical, neoclassical and baroque architecture, and its derivatives, consisting of a gable, usually of a triangular shape, placed above the horizontal structure of the entablature, typically supported by columns. The tympanum, the triangular area within the pediment, is often decorated with relief sculpture.Contents1 History 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The pediment is found in classical Greek temples, renaissance, and neoclassical architecture. A prominent example is the Parthenon, where it contains a tympanum decorated with figures in relief sculpture. This architectural element was developed in the architecture of ancient Greece. In Ancient Rome, the Renaissance, and later architectural revivals, the pediment was used as a non-structural element over windows, doors and aedicules.Swan-neck pediment at the Rev
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Pembroke College, Oxford
Pembroke College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England, located in Pembroke Square
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Ockham, Surrey
Ockham /ˈɒkəm/ is a rural and semi-rural village in the borough of Guildford
Guildford
in Surrey, England. The village starts immediately east of the A3 but the lands extend to the River Wey
River Wey
in the west where it has a large mill-house
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Surrey
Surrey
Surrey
(/ˈsʌri/ SURR-ee)[2] is a county in South East England, and one of the home counties. It borders Kent
Kent
to the east, Sussex
Sussex
to the south, Hampshire
Hampshire
to the west, Berkshire
Berkshire
to the north-west and Greater London
London
to the north-east. The county town is popularly considered to be Guildford
Guildford
although Surrey County Council
Surrey County Council
sits outside its jurisdiction in Kingston upon Thames, part of Greater London
Greater London
since 1965
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Sydney Smith
Sydney Smith
Sydney Smith
(3 June 1771 – 22 February 1845) was an English wit, writer and Anglican
Anglican
cleric.Contents1 Life 2 Legacy 3 Notes 4 Works 5 Secondary literature 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit] Born in Woodford, Essex, England, Smith was the son of merchant Robert Smith (1739–1827) and Maria Olier (1750–1801), who suffered from epilepsy. His father, described as "a man of restless ingenuity and activity",[citation needed] "very clever, odd by nature, but still more odd by design",[citation needed] owned, at various times, 19 different estates in England. Smith himself attributed much of his own lively personality to his French blood, his maternal grandfather having been a French Protestant refugee (a Huguenot) named Olier. He was the second of four brothers and one sister, all remarkable for their talents
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Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk
(/ˈsʌfək/) is an East Anglian county of historic origin in England. It has borders with Norfolk
Norfolk
to the north, Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the west and Essex
Essex
to the south. The North Sea
North Sea
lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds, Newmarket and Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.[2] The county is low-lying with very few hills, and is largely arable land with the wetlands of the Broads in the north
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Henry Hart Milman
Henry Hart Milman
Henry Hart Milman
(10 February 1791 – 24 September 1868[1]) was an English historian and ecclesiastic.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Family 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] He was born in London, the third son of Sir Francis Milman, 1st Baronet, physician to King George III (see Milman Baronets). Educated at Eton and at Brasenose College, Oxford, his university career was brilliant. He won the Newdigate prize with a poem on the Apollo Belvidere in 1812, was elected a fellow of Brasenose in 1814, and in 1816 won the English essay prize with his Comparative Estimate of Sculpture and Painting. In 1816 he was ordained, and two years later became parish priest of St Mary's, Reading. In 1821 Milman was elected professor of poetry at Oxford; and in 1827 he delivered the Bampton lectures
Bampton lectures
on The character and conduct of the Apostles considered as an evidence of Christianity
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Viscount Fordwich
Earl Cowper (pronounced "Cooper") was a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1718 by George I for William Cowper, 1st Baron Cowper, his first Lord Chancellor, with remainder in default of male issue of his own to his younger brother, Spencer Cowper. Cowper had already been created Baron Cowper of Wingham in the County of Kent, in the Peerage of England on 14 December 1706, with normal remainder to the heirs male of his body, and was made Viscount Fordwich, in the County of Kent, at the same time as he was given the earldom, also Peerage of Great Britain and with similar remainder. He was the great-grandson of William Cowper, who was created a Baronet, of Ratling Court in the County of Kent, in the Baronetage of England on 4 March 1642. The latter was succeeded by his grandson, the second Baronet. He represented Hertford in Parliament
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Tatton Park
Tatton Park
Tatton Park
is an historic estate in Cheshire, England, to the north of the town of Knutsford. It contains a mansion, Tatton Hall, a manor house dating from medieval times, Tatton Old Hall, gardens, a farm and a deer park of 2,000 acres (8.1 km2). It is a popular visitor attraction and hosts over 100 events annually. The estate is owned by the National Trust, who administer it jointly with Cheshire
Cheshire
East Council. Since 1999 it hosts North West England's annual Royal Horticultural Flower show.Contents1 History 2 Tatton Old Hall 3 Tatton Hall 4 Farm 5 Gardens 6 Parkland 7 Listed buildings 8 Wartime use 9 Events 10 Plans 11 See also 12 References 13 External linksHistory[edit] There is evidence of human habitation in the area of the estate going back to the Iron Age. In medieval times the village of Tatton was on the site
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Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, England, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the United Kingdom's most notable religious buildings and the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. The building itself was a Benedictine
Benedictine
monastic church until the monastery was dissolved in 1539. Between 1540 and 1556, the abbey had the status of a cathedral
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Cheshire
Cheshire
Cheshire
(/ˈtʃɛʃər/ CHESH-ər, /-ɪər/ -eer;[2] archaically the County Palatine of Chester)[3] is a county in North West England, bordering Merseyside
Merseyside
and Greater Manchester
Greater Manchester
to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
and Shropshire
Shropshire
to the south and Flintshire, Wales
Wales
to the west. Cheshire's county town is Chester; the largest town is Warrington.[4] Other major towns include Congleton, Crewe, Ellesmere Port, Macclesfield, Northwich, Runcorn, Widnes, Wilmslow, and Winsford.[5][6] The county covers 905 square miles (2,344 km2) and has a population of around 1 million
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Woburn Abbey
Woburn Abbey
Abbey
(/woʊbən/[n 1][3]) occupying the east of the village of Woburn, Bedfordshire, England, is a country house, the family seat of the Duke of Bedford
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Lord Wriothesley Russell
Lord Wriothesley Russell MA (11 May 1804 – 6 April 1886) was a Canon of Windsor from 1840 – 1886[1] Family[edit] He was born on 11 May 1804, the fourth son of John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford and Georgiana Gordon, daughter of Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon. He married his second cousin Elizabeth Russell. They had three children:Alfred John Russell (13 Aug 1833 – 11 Feb 1857) Algernon Wriothesley Russell (30 Aug 1835 – 19 Feb 1908) Evelyn Mary Eliza Russell (5 May 1837 – 5 Dec 1913)Career[edit] He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge and was awarded MA in 1829 He was appointed:Rector of Streatham, Surrey Rector of St Michael's Church, Chenies, Buckinghamshire 1829 Deputy Clerk of the Closet to Queen Victoria[2]He was appointed to the ninth stall in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle in 1840, a position he held until he resigned in 1886. Rev
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