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Ricasso
A ricasso is an unsharpened length of blade just above the guard or handle on a knife, dagger, sword, or bayonet. Blades designed this way appear at many periods in history in many parts of the world and date back to at least the Bronze Age; essentially, as long as humans have shaped cutting tools from metals. There were many reasons to make a blade with a ricasso, and in Europe, later longswords, claymores, rapiers and other lengthy swords often had this feature. One very simple influence presently and historically is fashion, which often answers this question for blades where the presence or lack of a ricasso has no effect on how it is used[dubious – discuss]. Leaving a ricasso can also save the blade maker's time - a section of blade that would not be used given the purpose of the piece does not have to be shaped and sharpened. In many cases however, they are quite functional. Historically, ricassos were commonly present on medieval and early Renaissance swords
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Claymore
A claymore (/ˈkleɪmɔːr/; from Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
claidheamh-mòr, "great sword")[1] is either the Scottish variant of the late medieval two-handed sword or the Scottish variant of the basket-hilted sword (incorrectly, as this sword is actually called a "Claybeg")
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Arming Sword
The sword typical of the European High Middle Ages
High Middle Ages
(sometimes academically categorized as knightly sword, knightly arming sword, or arming sword) was a straight, double-edged weapon with a single-handed cruciform hilt and a blade length of about 70 to 80 centimetres (28 to 31 in). The type is frequently depicted in period artwork, and numerous examples have been preserved archaeologically. The high medieval sword of the Romanesque period
Romanesque period
(10th to 13th centuries) develops gradually from the Carolingian sword
Carolingian sword
(spatha, "Viking sword") of the 9th century. In the Late Medieval period
Late Medieval period
(14th and 15th centuries), late forms of these swords continued to be used, but often as a sidearm, now called "arming sword" and contrasting with the two-handed, heavier longsword
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Crossguard
On a sword, the crossguard, or cross-guard, also known as quillons,[1] is a bar of metal at right angles to the blade, placed between the blade and the hilt. The crossguard was developed in the European sword around the 10th century for the protection of the wielder's hand. The earliest forms were the crossguard variant of the Spatha
Spatha
used by the Huns, the so-called Pontic swords. The crossguards were not only used to counter enemy attacks, but also to get a better grip on the sword. They were later seen in late Viking swords, and is a standard feature of the Norman sword
Norman sword
of the 11th century and of the knightly arming sword throughout the high and late medieval period.[citation needed] Early crossguards were straight metal bars, sometimes tapering towards the outer ends. While this simple type was never discontinued, more elaborate forms developed alongside it in the course of the Middle Ages
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Pike (weapon)
A pike is a pole weapon, a very long thrusting spear formerly used extensively by infantry. Unlike many similar weapons, the pike is not intended to be thrown. Pikes were used regularly in European warfare from the early Middle Ages[1] until around 1700, and were wielded by foot soldiers deployed in close quarters. The pike found extensive use with Landsknecht
Landsknecht
armies and Swiss mercenaries, who employed it as their main weapon and used it in pike square formations. A similar weapon, the sarissa, was also used by Alexander the Great's Macedonian phalanx infantry to great effect
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Melee
Melee
Melee
(/ˈmeɪleɪ/ or /ˈmɛleɪ/, French: mêlée [mɛle]) generally refers to disorganized close combat in battles fought at abnormally close range with little central control once it starts.[1] The French term was first used in English in c
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Crowbar (tool)
A crowbar, also called a wrecking bar, pry bar or prybar, pinch-bar, or occasionally a prise bar or prisebar, colloquially, in Britain and Australia
Australia
sometimes called a jimmy (also called jimmy bar or jemmy),[1] gooseneck, or pig foot, is a tool consisting of a metal bar with a single curved end and flattened points, often with a small fissure on one or both ends for removing nails. It is also a class 1 lever. In Britain, Ireland, New Zealand, and Australia, due to the influence of American media "crowbar" may occasionally be used loosely for this tool, but it is still mainly used to mean a larger straighter tool, its original English meaning (see digging bar). The term jammy or jimmy most often refers to the tool when used for burglary.[citation needed] It is used as a lever either to force apart two objects or to remove nails. Crowbars are commonly used to open nailed wooden crates, remove nails, or pry apart boards
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Gauntlet (glove)
A gauntlet /ˈɡɔːntlɪt/[1] is a name for several different styles of glove, particularly those with an extended cuff covering part of the forearm. Gauntlets exist in many forms, ranging from flexible fabric and leather gloves, to mail and fully articulated plate armour.Contents1 Types1.1 Armour 1.2 Sport, industry and science 1.3 Drum corps and marching band 1.4 Fashion 1.5 Religious2 Idioms2.1 "Throw down the gauntlet" 2.2 "Run the gauntlet"3 Notes and references 4 External linksTypes[edit] Armour[edit] Historically, gauntlets were used by soldiers and knights. It was considered an important piece of armour, since the hands and arms were particularly vulnerable in hand-to-hand combat. With the rise of easily reloadable and effective firearms, hand-to-hand combat fell into decline along with personal armour, including gauntlets. Some medieval gauntlets had a built-in knuckle duster
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Spada Da Lato
The spada da lato or side-sword is the Italian term for the type of sword popular during the late 16th century, corresponding to the Spanish espada ropera. It is a continuation of the medieval arming sword and in turn the predecessor of the rapier of the Early Modern period. Its use was taught in the Dardi school
Dardi school
of Italian fencing, influential on 17th century rapier fencing. [1] They were ideal for handling the mix of armored and unarmored opponents of that time. A new technique of placing one's finger on the ricasso to improve the grip (a practice that would continue in the rapier) led to the production of hilts with a guard for the finger. This sword design eventually led to the development of the civilian rapier, but it was not replaced by it, and the side-sword continued to be used during the rapier's lifetime
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Half-sword
Half-sword, in 14th- to 16th-century fencing with longswords, refers to the technique of gripping the central part of the sword blade with the left hand in order to execute more forceful thrusts against armoured and unarmoured opponents. The term is a translation of the original German Halbschwert. Equivalently, the techniques were referred to as mit dem kurzen Schwert "with the shortened sword."Page of the Codex Wallerstein
Codex Wallerstein
showing a half-sword thrust against a Mordhau
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Longsword
total: avg. 100–130 cm (39–51 in) blade: avg. 90–110 cm (35–43 in)A longsword (also spelled as long sword or long-sword) is a type of European sword characterized as having a cruciform hilt with a grip for two-handed use (around 16 to 28 cm (6 to 11 in)), a straight double-edged blade of around 85 to 110 cm (33 to 43 in), and weighing approximately 1 to 1.5 kg (2.2 to 3.3 lb).[1] [2] The "longsword" type exists in a morphological continuum with the medieval knightly sword and the Renaissance-era Zweihänder
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Rapier
Rapier
Rapier
(/ˈreɪpiər/) or espada ropera, is a loose term for a type of slender, sharply pointed sword. With such design features, the rapier is optimized to be a thrusting weapon, but cutting or slashing attacks were also recorded in some historical treatises like Capo Ferro's Gran Simulacro in 1610
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Ricasso
A ricasso is an unsharpened length of blade just above the guard or handle on a knife, dagger, sword, or bayonet. Blades designed this way appear at many periods in history in many parts of the world and date back to at least the Bronze Age; essentially, as long as humans have shaped cutting tools from metals. There were many reasons to make a blade with a ricasso, and in Europe, later longswords, claymores, rapiers and other lengthy swords often had this feature. One very simple influence presently and historically is fashion, which often answers this question for blades where the presence or lack of a ricasso has no effect on how it is used[dubious – discuss]. Leaving a ricasso can also save the blade maker's time - a section of blade that would not be used given the purpose of the piece does not have to be shaped and sharpened. In many cases however, they are quite functional. Historically, ricassos were commonly present on medieval and early Renaissance swords
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