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Ric Nattress
Eric James Nattress (born May 25, 1962 in Hamilton, Ontario)[1] is a former National Hockey League
National Hockey League
defenceman. He was drafted in the second round, 27th overall, by the Montreal Canadiens
Montreal Canadiens
in the 1980 NHL
NHL
Entry Draft. Nattress played three seasons in the Ontario
Ontario
Hockey League with the Brantford Alexanders before making his NHL
NHL
debut for Montreal in the 1982–83 season, appearing in 40 games.[2] Nattress would appear in 34 games with the Canadiens in 1983–84, and five more the next season, before being traded to the St. Louis Blues
St. Louis Blues
for cash before the 1985–86 season. Nattress played two seasons for the Blues, who traded him to the Calgary Flames
Calgary Flames
after the 1986–87 season for two draft picks
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Hamilton, Ontario
Hamilton (/ˈhæmɪltʌn/; is a port city in the Canadian province of Ontario. An industrialized city in the Golden Horseshoe
Golden Horseshoe
at the west end of Lake Ontario, Hamilton has a population of 536,917, and a metropolitan population of 747,545. On January 1, 2001, the new City of Hamilton was formed through the amalgamation of the former city and the other constituent lower-tier municipalities of the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth with the upper-tier regional government.[10] Residents of the old city are known as Hamiltonians.[11] Since 1981, the metropolitan area has been listed as the ninth largest in Canada
Canada
and the third largest in Ontario. Hamilton is home to the Royal Botanical Gardens, the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, the Bruce Trail, McMaster University, Redeemer University College and Mohawk College
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Nova Scotia Voyageurs
The Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia
Voyageurs were a professional ice hockey team, based in Halifax, Nova Scotia. They played in the American Hockey League, from 1971 to 1984. Originally chartered as the Houston Apollos of the Central Hockey League, the organization was relocated to Montreal after five seasons due to low attendance and travel costs. The Voyageurs (or "Vees" for short) played their first two seasons (1969–71), as the Montreal Voyageurs and were the affiliate of the National Hockey League's Montreal Canadiens. In 1971, they relocated to Halifax, Nova Scotia. They were the first AHL team to be located in Atlantic Canada, and would be the first to play in the Halifax Metro Centre. The team was also the first Canadian club to win the Calder Cup, and were the class of the league for many years - only in two seasons did the team garner a losing record, and the Voyageurs never missed the playoffs
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Season (sports)
In an organized sports league, a typical season is the portion of one year in which regulated games of the sport are in session: for example, in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
the season lasts approximately from April to October.[1] In other team sports, like association football or basketball, it is generally from August or September to May although in some countries - such as Northern Europe
Europe
or East Asia - the season starts in the spring and finishes in autumn, mainly due to weather conditions encountered during the winter. A year can often be broken up into several distinct sections (sometimes themselves called seasons)
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Goal (ice Hockey)
In ice hockey, a goal is scored when the puck entirely crosses the goal line between the two goal posts and below the goal crossbar. A goal awards one point to the team attacking the goal scored upon, regardless of which team the player who actually deflected the puck into the goal belongs to (see also own goal). Typically, a player on the team attempting to score shoots the puck with his/her stick towards the goal net opening, and a player on the opposing team called a goaltender tries to block the shot to prevent a goal from being scored against his/her team. The term goal may also refer to the structure in which goals are scored. The ice hockey goal is rectangular in shape; the front frame of the goal is made of steel tube painted red (or another color depending on the league) and consists of two vertical goalposts and a horizontal crossbar. A net is attached to the back of the frame to catch pucks that enter the goal and also to prevent pucks from entering it from behind
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Assist (ice Hockey)
In ice hockey, an assist is attributed to up to two players of the scoring team who shot, passed or deflected the puck towards the scoring teammate, or touched it in any other way which enabled the goal, meaning that they were "assisting" in the goal. There can be a maximum of two assists per goal
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Point (ice Hockey)
In ice hockey, point has three contemporary meanings:A point is awarded to a player for each goal scored or assist earned. The total number of goals plus assists equals total points. The Art Ross Trophy is awarded to the National Hockey League
National Hockey League
(NHL) player who leads the league in scoring points at the end of the regular season. Points are also awarded to assess standings (or rankings). For winning a game, a team always earns two points in the standings whether they win in regulation or overtime. When a team ties, they earn one point. Often, there are no ties (in the NHL as a result of many rule changes after the 2004–05 NHL lockout). However, a rule that was instituted in the 1999–2000 NHL season
1999–2000 NHL season
makes it so that when a team loses in overtime, they shall earn one point for making it to overtime. This rule includes shootouts, which were instituted after the aforementioned lockout
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Penalty (ice Hockey)
A penalty in ice hockey is a punishment for an infringement of the rules. Most penalties are enforced by sending the offending player to a penalty box for a set number of minutes. During the penalty the player may not participate in play. Penalties are called and enforced by the referee, or in some cases the linesman. The offending team may not replace the player on the ice (although there are some exceptions, such as fighting), leaving them short-handed as opposed to full strength. When the opposing team is said to be on a power play, they will have one more player on the ice than the short-handed team. The short-handed team is said to be "on the penalty kill" until the penalty expires and the penalized player returns to play
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Ontario Hockey Association
The Ontario
Ontario
Hockey Association (OHA) is the governing body for the majority of junior and senior level ice hockey teams in the Province of Ontario. The OHA is sanctioned by the Ontario
Ontario
Hockey Federation along with the Northern Ontario
Ontario
Hockey Association. Other Ontario sanctioning bodies along with the OHF include the Hockey Eastern Ontario
Ontario
and Hockey Northwestern Ontario. The OHA control 3 tiers of junior hockey; the "Tier 2 Junior "A", Junior "B" , Junior "C", and one senior hockey league, Allan Cup
Allan Cup
Hockey. In 1980, the Ontario
Ontario
Major Junior Hockey League vacated what was known as Tier I Junior "A" hockey. The league is now known as the Ontario Hockey League
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1980–81 OHL Season
The 1980–81 OHL season was the first season of the newly established Ontario Hockey League, renaming itself from the Ontario Major Junior Hockey League. The OMJHL formally severed ties with the Ontario Hockey Association over the summer, and affiliated with the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association. The OHL inaugurated the Jack Ferguson Award for the first overall draft pick in the OHL entry draft. Twelve teams each played 68 games. The Kitchener Rangers
Kitchener Rangers
won the J. Ross Robertson Cup, defeating the Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds.Contents1 Regular season1.1 Standings 1.2 Scoring leaders2 Playoffs2.1 First round 2.2 Quarterfinals 2.3 Semifinals 2.4 J. Ross Robertson Cup3 Awards 4 See also 5 ReferencesRegular season[edit] Standings[edit]Leyden Division GP W L T Pts GF GAy-Sault Ste
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1981–82 OHL Season
The 1981–82 OHL season was the second season of the Ontario Hockey League. The league grows by two teams when, the Cornwall Royals
Cornwall Royals
are transferred from the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League, and the Belleville Bulls
Belleville Bulls
are awarded a franchise. Fourteen teams each played 68 games. The Kitchener Rangers
Kitchener Rangers
won the J. Ross Robertson Cup, defeating the Ottawa 67's.Contents1 Regular season1.1 Standings 1.2 Scoring leaders2 Playoffs2.1 First round 2.2 Quarterfinals 2.3 Semifinals 2.4 J
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1981–82 AHL Season
The 1981–82 AHL season was the 46th season of the American Hockey League. Eleven teams played 80 games each in the schedule
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1982–83 AHL Season
The 1982–83 AHL season was the 47th season of the American Hockey League. Thirteen teams played 80 games each in the schedule. The Rochester Americans
Rochester Americans
finished first overall in the regular season, and won their fourth Calder Cup
Calder Cup
championship.Contents1 Team changes 2 Final standings 3 Scoring leaders 4 Calder Cup
Calder Cup
playoffs 5 Trophy and award winners 6 See also 7 ReferencesTeam changes[edit]The New Brunswick Hawks
New Brunswick Hawks
become the St. Catharines Saints
St

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Regular Season
In an organized sports league, a typical season is the portion of one year in which regulated games of the sport are in session: for example, in Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
the season lasts approximately from April to October.[1] In other team sports, like association football or basketball, it is generally from August or September to May although in some countries - such as Northern Europe
Europe
or East Asia - the season starts in the spring and finishes in autumn, mainly due to weather conditions encountered during the winter. A year can often be broken up into several distinct sections (sometimes themselves called seasons)
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American Hockey League
The American Hockey League
American Hockey League
(AHL) is a 30-team professional ice hockey league based in the United States and Canada that serves as the primary developmental league for the National Hockey League
National Hockey League
(NHL).[2] Since the 2010–11 season, every team in the league has an affiliation agreement with one NHL team. When NHL teams do not have an AHL affiliate, players are assigned to AHL teams affiliated with other NHL teams. Twenty-six AHL teams are located in the United States and the remaining four are in Canada. The league offices are located in Springfield, Massachusetts, and its current president is David Andrews. In general, a player must be at least 20 years of age to play in the AHL or not currently be beholden to a junior ice hockey team
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NHL
The National Hockey League
National Hockey League
(NHL; French: Ligue nationale de hockey—LNH) is a professional ice hockey league in North America, currently comprising 31 teams: 24 in the United States and 7 in Canada. The NHL is considered to be the premier professional ice hockey league in the world,[3] and one of the major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada
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