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Rhetoric
Rhetoric
Rhetoric
is the art of discourse, wherein a writer or speaker strives to inform, persuade or motivate particular audiences in specific situations. It can also be in a visual form; as a subject of formal study and a productive civic practice, rhetoric has played a central role in the European tradition.[1] Its best known definition comes from Aristotle, who considers it a counterpart of both logic and politics, and calls it "the faculty of observing in any given case the available means of persuasion."[2] Rhetoric
Rhetoric
typically provides heuristics for understanding, discovering, and developing arguments for particular situations, such as Aristotle's three persuasive audience appeals, logos, pathos, and ethos. The five canons of rhetoric, which trace the traditional tasks in designing a persuasive speech, were first codified in classical Rome: invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery
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Free Speech
Freedom
Freedom
of speech is a principle that supports the freedom of an individual or a community to articulate their opinions and ideas without fear of retaliation, censorship, or sanction.[2][3][4][5] The term "freedom of expression" is sometimes used synonymously but includes any act of seeking, receiving, and imparting information or ideas, regardless of the medium used. Freedom
Freedom
of expression is recognized as a human right under article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Universal Declaration of Human Rights
(UDHR) and recognized in international human rights law in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
Rights
(ICCPR)
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Grammar
In linguistics, grammar (from Greek: γραμματική) is the set of structural rules governing the composition of clauses, phrases, and words in any given natural language. The term refers also to the study of such rules, and this field includes phonology, morphology, and syntax, often complemented by phonetics, semantics, and pragmatics. Speakers of a language have a set of internalized rules[1] for using that language and these rules constitute that language's grammar. The vast majority of the information in the grammar is — at least in the case of one's native language—acquired not by conscious study or instruction, but by observing other speakers
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Pieter Isaacsz
Pieter Isaacsz
Pieter Isaacsz
(1569, Helsingør
Helsingør
– September 14, 1625, Amsterdam), was a Danish-born Dutch Golden Age
Dutch Golden Age
painter.Contents1 Biography 2 Public collections 3 References 4 External linkBiography[edit]Christian IV of Denmark,1611-1616According to van Mander his father was from Haarlem
Haarlem
and he learned to paint in Amsterdam
Amsterdam
for a year and a half by Cornelis Ketel, and later by Hans von Achen.[1] Van Mander claimed he still lived in Amsterdam and went on to describe several portraits by him which he particularly admired, including a half-length portrait of Sara Schurmans playing a citar
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Reinhold Timm
Reinhold Timm
Reinhold Timm
(died 12 January 1639) was a Danish painter. From 1619 he participated in the decoration in the Long Hall at Rosenborg Castle in Copenhagen
Copenhagen
with 7 or 8 large allegorical paintings of which only one, Unge mænd brydes på en bro, is signed while the others are attributed. Today they are kept at Kronborg Castle.[1] From 1624 he was a drawing teacher at Sorø Academy. See also[edit]Art of DenmarkReferences[edit]^ "Reinhold Timm". Gyldendal. Retrieved 2010-03-16. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Reinhold Timm.Authority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 295305353 ULAN: 500016004 RKD: 77114This article about a Danish painter is a stub
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Rosenborg Castle
Rosenborg Castle
Castle
(Danish: Rosenborg Slot) is a renaissance castle located in Copenhagen, Denmark. The castle was originally built as a country summerhouse in 1606 and is an example of Christian IV's many architectural projects. It was built in the Dutch Renaissance style, typical of Danish buildings during this period, and has been expanded several times, finally evolving into its present condition by the year 1624. Architects Bertel Lange and Hans van Steenwinckel the Younger are associated with the structural planning of the castle.Contents1 History 2 Architecture2.1 Long Hall3 Rosenborg Collections 4 Gardens 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]Rosenborg Castle
Castle
seen from Gothersgade in 1749The castle was used by Danish regents as a royal residence until around 1710
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European History
The history of Europe
Europe
covers the peoples inhabiting Europe
Europe
from prehistory to the present. The period known as classical antiquity began with the emergence of the city-states of ancient Greece. Later, the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
came to dominate the entire Mediterranean basin. The fall of the Roman Empire in AD 476 traditionally marks the start of the Middle Ages. Beginning in the 14th century a Renaissance
Renaissance
of knowledge challenged traditional doctrines in science and theology. Simultaneously, the Protestant Reformation
Reformation
set up Protestant churches primarily in Germany, Scandinavia and England. After 1800, the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
brought prosperity to Britain and Western Europe. The main powers set up colonies in most of the Americas and Africa, and parts of Asia
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James Boyd White
James Boyd White (born 1938) is an American law professor, literary critic, scholar and philosopher who is generally credited with founding the "Law and Literature" movement and is the preeminent proponent of the analysis of constitutive rhetoric in the analysis of legal texts. Biography[edit] White attended Amherst College, from which he graduated in 1960 with a B.A. in Classics, and went on to earn an M.A. in English Literature from Harvard University
Harvard University
in 1961, and an LL.B.
LL.B.
from the Harvard Law School in 1964. He practiced with the firm of Foley, Hoag & Eliot in Boston
Boston
before moving into teaching. He taught at the University of Colorado School of Law from 1967 to 1974, at the University of Chicago Law School
University of Chicago Law School
from 1974 to 1983, and has been at the University of Michigan Law School from 1983 until the present
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Identification (psychology)
Identification is a psychological process whereby the subject assimilates an aspect, property, or attribute of the other and is transformed wholly or partially, by the model that other provides. It is by means of a series of identifications that the personality is constituted and specified. The roots of the concept can be found in Freud's writings
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Prose
Prose
Prose
is a form of language that exhibits a natural flow of speech and grammatical structure rather than a rhythmic structure as in traditional poetry, where the common unit of verse is based on meter or rhyme.Contents1 Background 2 Etymology 3 Origins 4 Structure 5 Types 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksBackground[edit] There are critical debates on the construction of prose: "... the distinction between verse and prose is clear, the distinction between poetry and prose is obscure".[1] Prose
Prose
in its simplicity and loosely defined structure is broadly adaptable to spoken dialogue, factual discourse, and to topical and fictional writing
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Socratic Dialogues
Socratic dialogue
Socratic dialogue
(Ancient Greek: Σωκρατικὸς λόγος) is a genre of literary prose developed in Greece at the turn of the fourth century BCE. It is preserved in the works of Plato
Plato
and Xenophon. The discussion of moral and philosophical problems between two or more characters in a dialogue is an illustration of one version of the Socratic method
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Trojan War
Setting: Troy
Troy
(modern Hisarlik, Turkey) Period: Bronze Age Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC Modern dating: c
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Helen Of Troy
In Greek mythology, Helen of Troy
Troy
(Greek: Ἑλένη, Helénē, pronounced [helénɛː]), also known as Helen of Sparta, or simply Helen, was said to have been the most beautiful woman in the world, who was married to King Menelaus
Menelaus
of Sparta, but eloped with Prince Paris
Paris
of Troy, resulting in the Trojan War
Trojan War
when the Achaeans set out to reclaim her and bring her back to Sparta. She was believed to have been the daughter of Zeus
Zeus
and Leda, and was the sister of Clytemnestra
Clytemnestra
and Castor and Polydeuces. Elements of her putative biography come from classical authors such as Aristophanes, Cicero, Euripides
Euripides
and Homer
Homer
(in both the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey). Her story appears in Book II of Virgil's Aeneid
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Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
Greece
was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the Byzantine
Byzantine
era.[1] Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse
Late Bronze Age collapse
of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the period of Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin. This was followed by the period of Classical Greece, an era that began with the Greco-Persian Wars, lasting from the 5th to 4th centuries BC
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Heuristics
A heuristic technique (/hjʊəˈrɪstɪk/; Ancient Greek: εὑρίσκω, "find" or "discover"), often called simply a heuristic, is any approach to problem solving, learning, or discovery that employs a practical method not guaranteed to be optimal or perfect, but sufficient for the immediate goals. Where finding an optimal solution is impossible or impractical, heuristic methods can be used to speed up the process of finding a satisfactory solution. Heuristics can be mental shortcuts that ease the cognitive load of making a decision
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Science
Science
Science
(from Latin scientia, meaning "knowledge")[2][3]:58 is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe.[a] Contemporary science is typically subdivided into the natural sciences which study the material world, the social sciences which study people and societies, and the formal sciences like mathematics
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