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Revolver
A revolver (also called a wheel gun[1][2]) is a repeating handgun that has a revolving cylinder containing multiple chambers and at least one barrel for firing. Revolvers might be regarded as a type of pistol, or as a subset of handguns, distinct from pistols, which in this case are defined as handguns with a single chamber. The revolver allows the user to fire multiple rounds without reloading after every shot, unlike older single shot firearms. After a round is fired the hammer is cocked and the next chamber in the cylinder is aligned with the barrel by the shooter either manually pulling the hammer back (single action operation) or by rearward movement of the trigger (double action operation). Revolvers still remain popular as back-up and off-duty handguns among American law enforcement
American law enforcement
officers and security guards and are still common in the American private sector as defensive and sporting/hunting firearms
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Armory (military)
An arsenal is a place where arms and ammunition are made, maintained and repaired, stored, or issued, in any combination, whether privately or publicly owned
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Percussion Cap
The percussion cap, introduced circa 1820, was the crucial invention that enabled muzzleloading firearms to fire reliably in any weather.[1] This gave rise to the caplock or percussionlock system. Before this development, firearms used flintlock ignition systems that produced flint-on-steel sparks to ignite a pan of priming powder and thereby fire the gun's main powder charge (the flintlock mechanism replaced older ignition systems such as the matchlock and wheellock). Flintlocks were prone to misfire in wet weather, and many flintlock firearms were later converted to the more reliable percussion system.Contents1 Description 2 History2.1 Firing devices and fuze mechanisms3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] The percussion cap is a small cylinder of copper or brass with one closed end. Inside the closed end is a small amount of a shock-sensitive explosive material such as fulminate of mercury
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Machinist
A machinist is a person who machines using hand tools and machine tools to prototype, fabricate or make modifications to a part that is made of metal, plastics, or wood.Contents1 Related occupational titles 2 Role in manufacturing 3 Additive Machining 4 Materials commonly encountered by machinists 5 Tools of the machinist 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksRelated occupational titles[edit] A traditional machinist is one who can: operate a machine tool, disassemble and repair the machine tool by building new parts such as gears, splines, and shafts from scratch using various machine tools such as mills, lathes, grinders, planers, etc. Then reassemble the machine tool and operate it. Under the machinist title are other specialty titles that refer to specific skills that may be more highly developed to meet the needs of a particular job position, such as fitter (assembles parts), turning hand, mill hand, and grinder
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Sales
Sales
Sales
is activity related to selling or the amount of goods or services sold in a given time period. The seller or the provider of the goods or services completes a sale in response to an acquisition, appropriation,[1] requisition or a direct interaction with the buyer at the point of sale. There is a passing of title (property or ownership) of the item, and the settlement of a price, in which agreement is reached on a price for which transfer of ownership of the item will occur. The seller, not the purchaser generally executes the sale and it may be completed prior to the obligation of payment
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Ratchet And Pawl
A ratchet is a mechanical device that allows continuous linear or rotary motion in only one direction while preventing motion in the opposite direction. Ratchets are widely used in machinery and tools. Though something of a misnomer, "ratchet" is also often used to refer to ratcheting socket wrenches, a common tool with a ratcheting handle.Contents1 Theory of operation1.1 Backlash2 Uses 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesTheory of operation[edit]Figure 2: A ratchet moving in its "forward" direction.A ratchet consists of a round gear (see Figure 1) or linear rack with teeth, and a pivoting, spring-loaded finger called a pawl (or click[1][2]) that engages the teeth
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Capstan (nautical)
A capstan is a vertical-axled rotating machine developed for use on sailing ships to multiply the pulling force of seamen when hauling ropes, cables, and hawsers. The principle is similar to that of the windlass, which has a horizontal axle.Contents1 History1.1 Early form 1.2 Later form 1.3 Modern form2 Similar machines 3 Use on land 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The word, connected with the Old French
Old French
capestan or cabestan(t), from Old Provençal cabestan, from capestre "pulley cord," from Latin capistrum, -a halter, from capere, to take hold of, seems to have come into English (14th century) from Portuguese or Spanish shipmen at the time of the Crusades.[1] Both device and word are considered Spanish inventions.[2] Early form[edit]A capstan on a sailing ship
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Matchlock
The matchlock was the first mechanism invented to facilitate the firing of a hand-held firearm. Before this, firearms (like the hand cannon) had to be fired by applying a lit match (or equivalent) to the priming powder in the flash pan by hand; this had to be done carefully, taking most of the soldier's concentration at the moment of firing, or in some cases required a second soldier to fire the weapon while the first held the weapon steady. Adding a matchlock made the firing action simple and reliable by a single soldier, allowing him to keep both hands steadying the gun and eyes on the target while firing.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Modern use 4 ReferencesDescription[edit]Engraving of musketeers from the Thirty Years' WarThe classic European matchlock gun held a burning slow match in a clamp at the end of a small curved lever known as the serpentine
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Electric Motor
An electric motor is an electrical machine that converts electrical energy into mechanical energy. Most electric motors operate through the interaction between the motor's magnetic field and electric current in a wire winding to generate force in the form of rotation of a shaft. Electric motors can be powered by direct current (DC) sources, such as from batteries, motor vehicles or rectifiers, or by alternating current (AC) sources, such as a power grid, inverters or electrical generators. An electric generator is mechanically identical to an electric motor, but operates in the reverse direction, converting mechanical energy into electrical energy. Electric motors may be classified by considerations such as power source type, internal construction, application and type of motion output
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Muzzleloader
A muzzleloader is any firearm into which the projectile and usually the propellant charge is loaded from the muzzle of the gun (i.e., from the forward, open end of the gun's barrel). This is distinct from the more popular modern (higher tech and harder to make) designs of breech-loading firearms. The term "muzzleloader" applies to both rifled and smoothbore type muzzleloaders, and may also refer to the marksman who specializes in the shooting of such firearms. The firing methods, paraphernalia and mechanism further divide both categories as do caliber (from cannons to small-caliber palm guns). Modern muzzleloading firearms range from reproductions of sidelock, flintlock and percussion long guns, to in-line rifles that use modern inventions such as a closed breech, sealed primer and fast rifling to allow for considerable accuracy at long ranges. Modern mortars use a shell with the propelling charge and primer attached at the base
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Grenade Launcher
A grenade launcher[1][2] is a weapon that fires a specially-designed large-caliber projectile, often with an explosive, smoke or gas warhead. Today, the term generally refers to a class of dedicated firearms firing unitary grenade cartridges. The most common type are man-portable, shoulder-fired weapons issued to individuals, although larger crew-served launchers are issued at higher levels of organisation by military forces.[3] Grenade launchers can either come in the form of standalone weapons (either single-shot or repeating) or attachments mounted to a parent firearm, usually a rifle
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Tool And Die Maker
Tool and die makers are a class of machinists in the manufacturing industries who make jigs, fixtures, dies, molds, machine tools, cutting tools, gauges, and other tools used in manufacturing processes.[1] Depending on which area of concentration a particular person works in, he or she may be called by variations on the name, including tool maker (toolmaker), die maker (diemaker), mold maker (moldmaker), tool fitter (toolfitter), etc. Tool and die makers work primarily in toolroom environments—sometimes literally in one room but more often in an environment with flexible, semipermeable boundaries from production work
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Dirty Harry
Dirty Harry
Dirty Harry
is a 1971 American action crime thriller film produced and directed by Don Siegel, the first in the Dirty Harry
Dirty Harry
series. Clint Eastwood plays the title role, in his first outing as San Francisco Police
Police
Department (SFPD) Inspector "Dirty" Harry Callahan. The film drew upon the actual case of the Zodiac Killer
Zodiac Killer
as the Callahan character seeks out a similar vicious psychopath.[2] Dirty Harry
Dirty Harry
was a critical and commercial success and set the style for a whole genre of police films
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Smith And Wesson Model 29
Smith
Smith
may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Occupations 3 Arts and entertainment 4 Places4.1 North America 4.2 Antarctica 4.3 Outer space 4.4 Other places5 Businesses 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPeople[edit] Smith
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Gunpowder
Gunpowder, also known as black powder to distinguish it from modern smokeless powder, is the earliest known chemical explosive. It consists of a mixture of sulfur, charcoal, and potassium nitrate (saltpeter)
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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