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Reservoir (water)
A reservoir (from French réservoir – a "tank") is a storage space for fluids. These fluids may be water, hydrocarbons or gas. A reservoir usually means an enlarged natural or artificial lake, storage pond or impoundment created using a dam or lock to store water. Reservoirs can be created by controlling a stream that drains an existing body of water. They can also be constructed in river valleys using a dam. Alternately, a reservoir can be built by excavating flat ground or constructing retaining walls and levees. Tank reservoirs store liquids or gases in storage tanks that may be elevated, at grade level, or buried
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Reservoir (other)
A reservoir is an artificial lake. Reservoir
Reservoir
may also refer to:A thermodynamic reservoir, an ideal thermodynamical system. Reservoir, Victoria, a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Reservoir, Western Australia, a suburb of Perth, Western Australia, Australia Reservoir, California, a former settlement in California, United States Reservoir
Reservoir
(a
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Llwyn-on Reservoir
Llwyn-on Reservoir
Reservoir
is the largest and southernmost of the three reservoirs in the Taff Fawr valley in South Wales. It is owned by Welsh Water. It is located in the Brecon
Brecon
Beacons National Park. The eastern half is in the Merthyr Tydfil
Merthyr Tydfil
unitary authority area and the western half is in the Rhondda Cynon Taff
Rhondda Cynon Taff
unitary authority area. The reservoir is within the historic county boundaries of Breconshire. The dam is adjacent to Llwyn-On village. Nant Gwinau, Nant Car and Garwnant are the major streams that enter the reservoir. To the east of the reservoir is the 462m mountain of Garn Ddu, and to the west is the 485m mountain of Cadair Fawr. There are a variety of guided walks and waymarked paths. Environmental sculptures can be found on the Wern and Willow walks. The Taff Trail and the Navvies Line paths link Cefn Coed-y-Cymmer to Brecon
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French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
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Llyn Celyn
Llyn Celyn
Llyn Celyn
is a large reservoir constructed between 1960 and 1965 in the valley of the River Tryweryn
River Tryweryn
in Gwynedd, Wales. It measures roughly 2.5 miles (4.0 km) long by 1 mile (1.6 km) wide, and has a maximum depth of 140 ft (43 m). It has the capacity to hold 71,200,000 cubic metres (93,100,000 cu yd) of water.[1] It was originally to be named Llyn Tryweryn Mawr (meaning "Great Tryweryn Lake"), but in September 1964 Liverpool
Liverpool
Corporation agreed to the name change following a letter by the Tryweryn Defence Committee.[2]Contents1 Construction and opposition 2 Operation of reservoir 3 Diversions and closures of transport links 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksConstruction and opposition[edit] Construction of the reservoir involved flooding the village of Capel Celyn and adjacent farmland, a deeply controversial move
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Petrella Salto
Petrella Salto
Petrella Salto
is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Rieti
Province of Rieti
in the Italian region Latium, located about 60 kilometres (37 mi) northeast of
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Lake Salto
Lago del Salto
Lago del Salto
is a reservoir lake in the Province of Rieti, Lazio, Italy. At an elevation of 535 m, its surface area is 10 km².This Lazio
Lazio
location article is a stub
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Drainage Basin
A drainage basin is any area of land where precipitation collects and drains off into a common outlet, such as into a river, bay, or other body of water
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Llyn Clywedog
The Clywedog reservoir
Clywedog reservoir
(Welsh: Llyn Clywedog) is a reservoir near Llanidloes, Wales. Completed in 1967, the reservoir was built near the B4518 road, Powys, to control the flow of the River Severn[1][2] [3] by river regulation and to mitigate flooding in the lower Severn by storing excess winter rainfall. The reservoir was formed by damming the Afon Clywedog, a tributary of the River Severn. Its concrete buttress dam is the tallest concrete dam in the UK, with a height of 72 metres and a length of 230 metres. When at capacity the reservoir contains approximately 50,000 megalitres of water
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Mid Wales
Mid Wales (Welsh: Canolbarth Cymru or simply Y Canolbarth "The Midlands") is the name given to the central region of Wales
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River Taff
The River Taff
River Taff
(Welsh: Afon Taf) is a river in Wales. It rises as two rivers in the Brecon Beacons; the Taf Fechan
Taf Fechan
(Little Taff) and the Taf Fawr (Big Taff) before becoming one just north of Merthyr Tydfil. Its confluence with the River Severn
River Severn
estuary is in Cardiff. The river supports a number of migratory fish, including salmon, sewen, and eel.Contents1 Course1.1 Diversion in Cardiff2 Taf Fawr 3 Taf Fechan 4 Tributaries4.1 Nant Ffrwd 4.2 Nant Morlais and Nant Rhydycar 4.3 Taff Bargoed, Cynon, Nant Clydach
Nant Clydach
and Rhondda5 Mouth of the Taff 6 "Taffy" as a pejorative 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksCourse[edit] From its confluence at Cefn-coed-y-cymmer, the river flows south, passing several towns. It picks up a few tributaries, such as the River Cynon, River Rhondda, Bargoed Taf and Nant Clydach
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Cantref Reservoir
Cantref Reservoir
Reservoir
is the middle of the three reservoirs in the Taff Fawr valley in Wales. It is owned by Welsh Water. It is located in the Brecon Beacons National Park, mostly in the Powys
Powys
unitary authority area and within the historic county boundaries of Breconshire. Part of the south west corner is in the Rhondda Cynon Taff
Rhondda Cynon Taff
unitary authority area. A public footpath crosses the dam and links with the Taff Trail
Taff Trail
and the Navvies Line paths. External links[edit]" Welsh Water
Welsh Water
Recreation Guide" (PDF).  (409 KiB) www.geograph.co.uk : photos of the Cantref reservoir and surrounding areaThis Powys
Powys
location article is a stub
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Nile
The Nile
Nile
(Arabic: النيل‎, Egyptian Arabic en-Nīl, Standard Arabic an-Nīl; Coptic: ⲫⲓⲁⲣⲱ, P(h)iaro; Ancient Egyptian: Ḥ'pī and Jtrw; Biblical Hebrew: הַיְאוֹר‬, Ha-Ye'or or הַשִׁיחוֹר‬, Ha-Shiḥor) is a major north-flowing river in northeastern Africa, and is commonly regarded as the longest river in the world,[1] though some sources cite the Amazon River
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Beacons Reservoir
Beacons Reservoir
Reservoir
(Welsh: Cronfa'r Bannau) is the northernmost of the three reservoirs in the Taff Fawr valley in South Wales. It is owned by Welsh Water.[1] As its name suggests, it is located in the Brecon Beacons National Park in the Powys
Powys
unitary authority area and within the historic county boundaries of Breconshire. There is access to the Taff Trail
Taff Trail
and the Navvies Line from the car park below the dam. Archaeological sites[edit] During periods of low water, the remains of longhouses can be seen. One building overlooking the Taff Fawr has foundations of massive weathered slabs. Flint tools have been found. References[edit]^ "A Guide To Recreation Around The Reservoirs Of Wales" (pdf). Welsh Water. p. 10
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Siphon
The word siphon (/ˈsaɪfən/ SY-fən;[1] from Ancient Greek: σίφων "pipe, tube", also spelled syphon) is used to refer to a wide variety of devices that involve the flow of liquids through tubes. In a narrower sense, the word refers particularly to a tube in an inverted 'U' shape, which causes a liquid to flow upward, above the surface of a reservoir, with no pump, but powered by the fall of the liquid as it flows down the tube under the pull of gravity, then discharging at a level lower than the surface of the reservoir from which it came. There are two leading theories about how siphons cause liquid to flow uphill, against gravity, without being pumped, and powered only by gravity. The traditional theory for centuries was that gravity pulling the liquid down on the exit side of the siphon resulted in reduced pressure at the top of the siphon
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Bank (geography)
In geography, the word bank generally refers to the land alongside a body of water. Different structures are referred to as banks in different fields of geography, as follows. In limnology (the study of inland waters), a stream bank or river bank is the terrain alongside the bed of a river, creek, or stream.[1] The bank consists of the sides of the channel, between which the flow is confined.[1] Stream
Stream
banks are of particular interest in fluvial geography, which studies the processes associated with rivers and streams and the deposits and landforms created by them. Bankfull discharge is a discharge great enough to fill the channel and overtop the banks.[2] The descriptive terms left bank and right bank are relative to an observer looking downstream, in which the right bank is to the observer's right; a famous example is the naming of the two sides of the Seine
Seine
in Paris
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