HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Republic Of Albania
Albania
Albania
(/ælˈbeɪniə, ɔːl-/ ( listen) a(w)l-BAY-nee-ə; Albanian: Shqipëri/Shqipëria; Gheg
Gheg
Albanian: Shqipni/Shqipnia or Shqypni/Shqypnia),[6] officially the Republic
Republic
of Albania
Albania
(Albanian: Republika e Shqipërisë, pronounced [ɾɛpuˈblika ɛ ʃcipəˈɾiːsə]), is a country in Southeastern Europe. The country spans 28,748 square kilometres (11,100 square miles) and had a total population of 3 million people as of 2016[update]
[...More...]

"Republic Of Albania" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gheg Albanian Language
Gheg (or Geg; Gheg Albanian: gegnisht, Standard Albanian: gegë or gegërishtja) is one of the two major varieties of Albanian. The other is Tosk
Tosk
on which Standard Albanian is based. The geographic dividing line between the two varieties is the Shkumbin River, which winds its way through central Albania.[8][9] Gheg is spoken in Northern Albania, Kosovo, northwestern Republic of Macedonia, southeastern Montenegro
Montenegro
and southern Serbia, by the ethnic group known as Ghegs.[9] Gheg does not have any official status as a written language in any country. Publications in Kosovo
Kosovo
and Macedonia are in Standard Albanian, which is based on Tosk
[...More...]

"Gheg Albanian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

List Of Countries And Territories By Population Density
This is a list of countries and dependent territories ranked by population density, measured by the number of human inhabitants per square kilometer. The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories based upon the ISO standard ISO 3166-1. The list also includes but does not rank unrecognized but de facto independent countries. The figures in the following table are based on areas including inland water bodies (lakes, reservoirs, rivers). Figures used in this article are mainly based on the latest censuses and official estimates (or projections)
[...More...]

"List Of Countries And Territories By Population Density" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gross Domestic Product
Gross domestic product
Gross domestic product
(GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all final goods and services produced in a period (quarterly or yearly) of time. Nominal GDP estimates are commonly used to determine the economic performance of a whole country or region, and to make international comparisons
[...More...]

"Gross Domestic Product" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Purchasing Power Parity
Purchasing power parity (PPP) is an economic theory that states that the exchange rate between two countries is equal to the ratio of the currencies' respective purchasing power. Theories that invoke purchasing power parity assume that in some circumstances (for example, as a long-run tendency) it would cost exactly the same number of, for example, US dollars to buy euros and then to use the difference in value to buy a market basket of goods as it would cost to directly purchase the market basket of goods with dollars. A fall in either currency's purchasing power would lead to a proportional decrease in that currency's valuation on the foreign exchange market. The concept of purchasing power parity allows one to estimate what the exchange rate between two currencies would have to be in order for the exchange to be at par with the purchasing power of the two countries' currencies
[...More...]

"Purchasing Power Parity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gini Coefficient
In economics, the Gini coefficient
Gini coefficient
(/ˈdʒiːni/ JEE-nee; sometimes expressed as a Gini ratio or a normalized Gini index) is a measure of statistical dispersion intended to represent the income or wealth distribution of a nation's residents, and is the most commonly used measurement of inequality. It was developed by the Italian statistician and sociologist Corrado Gini and published in his 1912 paper Variability and Mutability (Italian: Variabilità e mutabilità).[1][2] The Gini coefficient
Gini coefficient
measures the inequality among values of a frequency distribution (for example, levels of income). A Gini coefficient of zero expresses perfect equality, where all values are the same (for example, where everyone has the same income)
[...More...]

"Gini Coefficient" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Human Development Index
The Human Development Index
Human Development Index
(HDI) is a composite statistic (composite index) of life expectancy, education, and per capita income indicators, which are used to rank countries into four tiers of human development. A country scores higher HDI when the lifespan is higher, the education level is higher, and the GDP per capita
GDP per capita
is higher. The HDI was developed by Pakistani economist Mahbub ul Haq
Mahbub ul Haq
for the UNDP.[1][2] The 2010 Human Development Report
Human Development Report
introduced an Inequality-adjusted Human Development Index
Human Development Index
(IHDI)
[...More...]

"Human Development Index" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

List Of Countries By Human Development Index
This is a list of all the countries by the Human Development Index
Human Development Index
as included in a United Nations Development Programme's Human Development Report. The latest report was released on 21 March 2017 and compiled on the basis of estimates for 2015.[1] In the 2010 Human Development Report
Human Development Report
a further Inequality-adjusted Human Development Index
Human Development Index
(IHDI) was introduced
[...More...]

"List Of Countries By Human Development Index" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ottoman Empire
The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Devlet-i ʿAlīye-i ʿOsmānīye[dn 5]), also historically known in Western Europe
Europe
as the Turkish Empire[8] or simply Turkey,[9] was a state that controlled much of southeastern Europe, western Asia and northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia
Anatolia
in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman.[10] After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman Beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire
[...More...]

"Ottoman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Principality Of Albania (medieval)
A principality (or princedom) can either be a monarchical feudatory or a sovereign state, ruled or reigned over by a monarch with the title of prince or by a monarch with another title within the generic use of the term prince.Contents1 Terminology 2 European2.1 Development 2.2 Consolidation 2.3 Nationalism 2.4 Ecclesiastical principalities3 Asia 4 Other principalities4.1 Other 4.2 Micronational principalities5 See also 6 References 7 Sources and referencesTerminology[edit] Most of these states have historically been a polity, but in some occasions were rather territories in respect of which a princely title is held. The prince's estate and wealth may be located mainly or wholly outside the geographical confines of the principality. Generally recognised surviving sovereign principalities are Liechtenstein, Monaco, and the co-principality of Andorra. Extant royal primogenitures styled as principalities include Asturias (Spain)
[...More...]

"Principality Of Albania (medieval)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

ISO 4217
ISO 4217
ISO 4217
is a standard first published by International Organization for Standardization in 1978, which delineates currency designators, country codes (alpha and numeric), and references to minor units in three tables:Table A.1 – Current currency & funds code list[1] Table A.2 – Current funds codes[2] Table A.3 – List of codes for historic denominations of currencies & funds[3]The tables, history and ongoing discussion are maintained by SIX Interbank Clearing on behalf of ISO and the Swiss Association for Standardization.[4] The ISO 4217
ISO 4217
code list is used in banking and business globally
[...More...]

"ISO 4217" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Central European Time
Central European Time
Central European Time
(CET), used in most parts of Europe
Europe
and a few North African
North African
countries, is a standard time which is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). The time offset from UTC
UTC
can be written as +01:00
[...More...]

"Central European Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
Universal Time
(abbreviated to UTC) is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time. It is within about 1 second of mean solar time at 0° longitude;[1] it does not observe daylight saving time
[...More...]

"Coordinated Universal Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
[...More...]

"Daylight Saving Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Central European Summer Time
Central European Summer Time
European Summer Time
(CEST), sometime referred also as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time
Central European Time
(UTC+1) during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+2, which makes it the same as Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time
South African Standard Time
and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.Contents1 Names 2 Period of observation 3 Usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesNames[edit] Other names which have been applied to Central European Summer Time are Middle European Summer Time
European Summer Time
(MEST), Central European Daylight Saving Time (CEDT), and Bravo Time (after the second letter of the NATO phonetic alphabet)
[...More...]

"Central European Summer Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Right- And Left-hand Traffic
The terms right-hand traffic (RHT) and left-hand traffic (LHT) refer to the practice, in bidirectional traffic situations, to keep to the right side or to the left side of the road, respectively. This is so fundamental to traffic flow that it is sometimes referred to as the rule of the road.[1] RHT is used in 163 countries and territories, with the remaining 76 countries and territories using LHT. Countries that use LHT account for about a sixth of the world's area and a quarter of its roads.[2] In 1919, 104 of the world's territories were LHT and an equal number were RHT. From 1919 to 1986, 34 of the LHT territories switched to RHT.[3] Many of the countries with LHT were formerly part of the British Empire. In addition, Cyprus, Japan, Indonesia
Indonesia
and other countries have retained the LHT tradition
[...More...]

"Right- And Left-hand Traffic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.