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Republic
A republic (Latin: res publica) is a form of government in which the country is considered a "public matter", not the private concern or property of the rulers. The primary positions of power within a republic are not inherited. It is a form of government under which the head of state is not a monarch.[1][2][3] In American English, the definition of a republic refers specifically to a form of government in which elected individuals represent the citizen body[2] and exercise power according to the rule of law under a constitution, including separation of powers with an elected head of state, referred to as a constitutional republic[4][5][6][7] or representative democracy. [8] As of 2017[update], 159 of the world's 206 sovereign states use the word "republic" as part of their official names – not all of these are republics in the sense of having elected governments, nor is the word "republic" used in the names of all nations with elected governments
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Chiefdom
A chiefdom is a form of hierarchical political organization in non-industrial societies usually based on kinship, and in which formal leadership is monopolized by the legitimate senior members of select families or 'houses'
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Legalism (Chinese Philosophy)
Huang-LaoHuangdi Sijing HuainanziEarly figuresGuan Zhong Zichan Deng Xi Li Kui Wu QiFounding figuresShen Buhai Duke Xiao of Qin Shang Yang Shen Dao Zhang Yi Xun Kuang Han Fei Li Si Qin Shi HuangHan figuresJia Yi Liu An Emperor Wen of Han Emperor Wu of Han Chao Cuo Gongsun Hong Zhang Tang Huan Tan Wang Fu Zhuge LiangLater figuresEmperor Wen of Sui Du You Wang Anshi Li Shanchang Zhang Juzheng Xu Guangqiv t eFajiia (Chinese: 法家; pinyin: Fǎjiā)[2] or Legalism is one of Sima Tan's six classical schools of thought in Chinese philosophy.[3] Roughly meaning "house of Fa" (administrative "methods" or "standards"),[4] the "school" (term) represents some several branches of realistic statesmen[5] or "men of methods" (fashu zishi)[6] foundational for the traditional Chinese bureaucratic empire.[7] Compared with Machiavelli,[8] it has often been considered in the Western world as akin to the Realpolitikal thought of
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Demarchy
In governance, sortition (also known as allotment or demarchy) selects political officials as a random sample from a larger pool of candidates.[1] The logic behind the sortition process originates from the idea that “power corrupts.” For that reason, when the time came to choose individuals to be assigned to empowering positions, the ancient Athenians resorted to choosing by lot
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Kritarchy
Kritarchy, also called kritocracy, is a system of rule by judges (Hebrew: שופטים‬, shoftim) in the tribal confederacy of ancient Israel during the period of time described in the Book of Judges, following Joshua's conquest of Canaan
Canaan
and prior to the united monarchy under Saul.[1] Because it is a compound of the Greek words κριτής, krites ("judge") and ἄρχω, árkhō ("to rule"), its use has expanded to cover rule by judges in the modern sense as well, as in the case of Somalia, ruled by judges with the polycentric legal tradition of xeer,[2] and arguably the Islamic Courts Union[citation needed] and in the fictional regime of Mega-city One, the focus of setting for the Judge
Judge
Dredd franchise. References[edit]^ Dictionary.com ^ A Peaceful Ferment in Somalia: Publications: The Independent InstituteThis government-related article is a stub
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Despotism
Despotism
Despotism
(Greek: Δεσποτισμός, Despotismós) is a form of government in which a single entity rules with absolute power. Normally, that entity is an individual, the despot, as in an autocracy, but societies which limit respect and power to specific groups have also been called despotic.[1] Colloquially, the word despot applies pejoratively to those who abuse their power and authority to oppress their populace, subjects, or subordinates. More specifically, the term often applies to a head of state or government
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Oligarchy
Oligarchy (from Greek ὀλιγαρχία (oligarkhía); from ὀλίγος (olígos), meaning 'few', and ἄρχω (arkho), meaning 'to rule or to command')[1][2][3] is a form of power structure in which power rests with a small number of people. These people might be distinguished by nobility, wealth, family ties, education or corporate, religious or military control. Such states are often controlled by families who typically pass their influence from one generation to the next, but inheritance is not a necessary condition for the application of this term. Throughout history, oligarchies have often been tyrannical, relying on public obedience or oppression to exist
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Netocracy
Netocracy was a term invented by the editorial board of the American technology magazine Wired in the early 1990s. A portmanteau of Internet
Internet
and aristocracy, netocracy refers to a perceived global upper-class that bases its power on a technological advantage and networking skills, in comparison to what is portrayed as a bourgeoisie of a gradually diminishing importance. The concept was later picked up and redefined by the Swedish philosophers Alexander Bard
Alexander Bard
and Jan Söderqvist
Jan Söderqvist
for their book Netocracy — The New Power Elite and Life After Capitalism (originally published in Swedish in 2000 as Nätokraterna - boken om det elektroniska klassamhället, published in English by Reuters/Pearsall UK in 2002). The netocracy concept has been compared with Richard Florida's concept of the creative class
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Ergatocracy
Ergatocracy (from the Greek word ἐργάτης, ergates, "worker" and the suffix -cracy, "government") is a type of government dominated by the labour and solidarities similar to communist beliefs. It refers to a society ruled by the working class. The term was coined by Eden and Cedar Paul in their book Creative Revolution: A Study of Communist Ergatocracy.[1][2] References[edit]^ Paul, Cedar; Paul, Eden (1920). Creative revolution:. new York: Thomas Seltzer. Retrieved 30 May 2015.  ^ https://bogdanovlibrary.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/2016-08-14-biggart-bogdanov-kultintern.pdf"ergatocracy." Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon. Dictionary.com, LLC. 21 Jan. 2015. <Dictionary.com http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ergatocracy>.This government-related article is a stub
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Stratocracy
A stratocracy (from στρατός, stratos, "army" and κράτος, kratos, "dominion", "power") is a form of government headed by military chiefs.[1] It is not the same as a military dictatorship or military junta where the military's political power is not enforced or even supported by other laws. Rather, stratocracy is a form of military government in which the state and the military are traditionally or constitutionally the same entity, and government positions are always occupied by commissioned officers and military leaders. Citizens with mandatory or voluntary military service, or veterans who have been honorable discharged, have the right to elect or govern. The military's administrative, judiciary, and/or legislature powers are supported by law, the constitution, and the society
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Associated State
An associated state is the minor partner in a formal, free relationship between a political territory with a degree of statehood and a (usually larger) nation, for which no other specific term, such as protectorate, is adopted. The details of such free association are contained in United Nations General Assembly
United Nations General Assembly
resolution 1541 (XV) Principle VI,[1] a Compact of Free Association
Compact of Free Association
or Associated Statehood Act and are specific to the countries involved. In the case of the Cook Islands
Cook Islands
and Niue, the details of their free association arrangement are contained in several documents, such as their respective constitutions, the 1983 Exchange of Letters between the governments of New Zealand
New Zealand
and the Cook Islands, and the 2001 Joint Centenary Declaration
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French And Raven's Bases Of Power
In a notable study of power conducted by social psychologists John R. P. French and Bertram Raven in 1959, power is divided into five separate and distinct forms. In 1965 Raven revised this model to include a sixth form by separating the informational power base as distinct from the expert power base.[1] Relating to social communication studies, power in social influence settings has introduced a large realm of research pertaining to persuasion tactics and leadership practices. Through social communication studies, it has been theorized that leadership and power are closely linked. It has been further presumed that different forms of power affect one's leadership and success. This idea is used often in organizational communication and throughout the workforce. In a notable study of power conducted by social psychologists John R
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Supranational Union
A supranational union is a type of multinational political union where negotiated power is delegated to an authority by governments of member states. The term is sometimes used to describe the European Union
European Union
(EU) as a new type of political entity.[1] It is the only entity that provides for international popular elections,[dubious – discuss] going beyond the level of political integration normally afforded by international treaties. The term "supranational" is sometimes used in a loose, undefined sense in other contexts such as a substitute for international, transnational or global. Another method of decision-making
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Types Of Democracy
Types of democracy refers to kinds of governments or social structures which allow people to participate equally, either directly or indirectly.[1]Contents1 Direct democracies 2 Representative democracies 3 Types based on location 4 Types based on level of freedom 5 Religious democracies 6 Other types of democracy 7 See also7.1 Further types8 References 9 External linksDirect democracies[edit] A direct democracy or pure democracy is a type of democracy where the people govern directly. It requires wide participation of citizens in politics.[2] Athenian democracy
Athenian democracy
or classical democracy refers to a direct democracy developed in ancient times in the Greek city-state of Athens
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Geniocracy
Geniocracy
Geniocracy
is the framework for a system of government which was first proposed by Raël (leader of the International Raëlian Movement) in 1977 and which advocates problem-solving, creative intelligence and compassion as criteria for governance.[1]A series of articles on the Raëlian MovementFounder • History Beliefs & practices Cloning (Clonaid) FundsViews on: Politics Economics CosmologyThis box:view talk editContents1 Definition1.1 Justifying the method of selection2 History2.1 Origins in Ancient Greece3 Agenda3.1 Response to criticism 3.2 Status 3.3
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Administrative Division
An administrative division, unit, entity, area or region, also referred to as a subnational entity, constituent unit, or country subdivision, is a portion of a country or other region delineated for the purpose of administration. Administrative divisions are granted a certain degree of autonomy and are usually required to manage themselves through their own local governments. Countries are divided up into these smaller units to make managing their land and the affairs of their people easier. A country may be divided into provinces, which, in turn, are divided into counties, which, in turn, may be divided in whole or in part into municipalities. Administrative divisions are conceptually separate from dependent territories, with the former being an integral part of the state and the other being only under some lesser form of control
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