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René Coty
World War I: Battle of Verdun
Battle of Verdun
(1916)Jules Gustave René Coty
René Coty
(French pronunciation: ​[ʁəne kɔti]; 20 March 1884 – 22 November 1962) was President of France
France
from 1954 to 1959. He was the second and last president of the Fourth French Republic.Contents1 Early life and politics 2 Postwar life and presidency 3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and politics[edit] René Coty
René Coty
was born in Le Havre
Le Havre
and studied at the University of Caen, where he graduated in 1902, receiving degrees in law and philosophy. He worked as a lawyer in his hometown of Le Havre, specialising in maritime and commercial law. He also became involved in politics, as a member of the Radical Party, and in 1907 was elected as a district councillor
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Independent Politician
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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French Nationality Law
French nationality law
French nationality law
is historically based on the principles of jus soli (Latin for "right of soil"), according to Ernest Renan's definition, in opposition to the German definition of nationality, jus sanguinis (Latin for "right of blood"), formalized by Johann Gottlieb Fichte. The 1993 Méhaignerie Law required children born in France
France
of foreign parents to request French nationality at adulthood, rather than being automatically accorded citizenship. This "manifestation of will" requirement was subsequently abrogated by the Guigou Law of 1998,[1] but children born in France
France
of foreign parents remain foreign until obtaining legal majority. Children born in France
France
to tourists or other short-term visitors do not acquire French citizenship by virtue of birth in France: residency must be proven
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Radical Party (France)
The Radical Party (French: Parti radical, also Parti radical valoisien, abbreviated to Rad.) was a liberal[4] and social-liberal[5] political party in France. Founded in 1901 as Republican, Radical and Radical-Socialist Party (Parti républicain, radical et radical-socialiste), it was the oldest active political party in France at the time of its dissolution. Coming from the Radical Republican tradition, the Radical Party upheld the principles of private property and secularism. The Radicals were originally a left-wing group, but with the emergence of the French Section of the Workers' International (SFIO) in 1905, the Radicals shifted towards the political centre. In 1972 the left wing of the party split off to form the centre-left Radical Party of the Left (PRG). The Radical Party then affiliated with the centre-right, becoming one of the founder parties of the Union for French Democracy (UDF) in 1978
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Democratic Republican Alliance
The Democratic Alliance (French: Alliance démocratique, AD), originally called Democratic Republican Alliance (French: Alliance républicaine démocratique, ARD), was a French political party (1901–1978) created in 1901 by followers of Léon Gambetta, such as Raymond Poincaré
Raymond Poincaré
who would be president of the Council in the 1920s. The party was at first conceived by members of the Radical-Socialist Party tied to the business world who united themselves in May 1901, along with many moderates, as gathering center-left liberals and "Opportunist" Republicans (Gambetta, etc.). However, after World War I and the parliamentary disappearance of monarchists and Bonapartists, it quickly became the main center-right party of the Third Republic. It was part of the National Bloc right-wing coalition which won the elections after the end of the war
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Seine-Inférieure
Seine-Maritime
Seine-Maritime
(French pronunciation: ​[sɛn maʁitim]) is a department of France
France
in the Normandy
Normandy
region of northern France. It is situated on the northern coast of France, at the mouth of the Seine, and includes the cities of Rouen
Rouen
and Le Havre
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Conseil Général
The departmental councils (French: conseil départemental [sing.], conseils départementaux [plur.]) of France are assemblies of the departments, elected by universal suffrage
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University Of Caen Normandy
The University
University
of Caen
Caen
Normandy
Normandy
(UNICAEN; French: Université de Caen Normandie) is a university in Caen
Caen
in Normandy, France.Contents1 History 2 Notable alumni 3 Miscellaneous 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford, founder of the UniversityThe institution was founded in 1432[3] by John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford, the first rector being a Cornishman, Michael Tregury, afterwards Archbishop of Dublin.[4] It originally consisted of a faculty of Canon Law
Canon Law
and a faculty of Law. By 1438, it already had five faculties
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Chamber Of Deputies
The chamber of deputies is the legislative body such as the lower house of a bicameral legislature, or also a unicameral legislature.Contents1 Description 2 Lower house
Lower house
in bicameral legislature 3 Unicameral
Unicameral
legislatures 4 Defunct chambers of deputies 5 See also 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] Historically, "French Chamber of Deputies" was the lower house of the French Parliament
French Parliament
during the Bourbon Restoration, the July Monarchy, and the French Third Republic; the name is still informally used for the National Assembly under the nation's current Fifth Republic. The term "chamber of deputies" — although it was used as the name of the lower house of parliament in Burma, a former British colony — is not widely used by English-speaking countries, the more popular equivalent being "House of Representatives"
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Lawyer
A lawyer or attorney is a person who practices law, as an advocate, barrister, attorney, counselor, solicitor, not as a paralegal or charter executive secretary.[1] Working as a lawyer involves the practical application of abstract legal theories and knowledge to solve specific individualized problems, or to advance the interests of those who hire lawyers to perform legal services. The role of the lawyer varies greatly across legal jurisdictions, and so it can be treated here in only the most general terms.[2][3]Contents1 Terminology 2 Responsibilities2.1 Oral argument in the courts 2.2 Research and drafting of court papers 2.3 Advocacy (written and oral) in administrative hearings 2.4 Client intake and counseling (with regard to pending litigation) 2.5 Legal advice 2.6 Protecting intellectual property 2.7 Negotiating and drafting contracts 2.8 Conveyancing 2.9 Carrying out the intent of the deceased 2.10 Prosecution and defense of criminal suspects3 Educati
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Legion Of Honour
The Legion of Honour, full name, National Order of the Legion of Honour (French: Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur),[2] is the highest French order of merit for military and civil merits, established in 1802 by Napoléon Bonaparte and retained by all the divergent governments and regimes later holding power in France, up to the present. The order's motto is "Honneur et Patrie" ("Honour and Fatherland"), and its seat is the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur
Palais de la Légion d'Honneur
next to the Musée d'Orsay, on the left bank of the
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French Army
The French Army, officially the Ground Army
Army
(French: Armée de terre [aʀme də tɛʀ]) (to distinguish it from the French Air Force, Armée de L'air or Air Army) is the land-based and largest component of the French Armed Forces. It is responsible to the Government of France, along with the other four components of the Armed Forces. The current Chief of Staff of the French Army
Chief of Staff of the French Army
(CEMAT) is General Jean-Pierre Bosser, a direct subordinate of the Chief of the Defence Staff (CEMA). General Bosser is also responsible, in part, to the Ministry of the Armed Forces for organization, preparation, use of forces, as well as planning and programming, equipment and Army
Army
future acquisitions
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Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
is the branch of an army that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces. Also known as foot soldiers, infantry traditionally relies on moving by foot between combats as well, but may also use mounts, military vehicles, or other transport
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