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Regions Of England
The REGIONS (formerly known as the GOVERNMENT OFFICE REGIONS; GORS) are the highest tier of sub-national division in England . Between 1994 and 2011, nine regions had officially devolved functions within Government. While they no longer fulfil this role, they continue to be used for statistical and some administrative purposes. They define areas (constituencies) for the purposes of elections to the European Parliament . Eurostat also uses them to demarcate first level Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) regions ("NUTS 1 regions") within the European Union . The regions generally follow the boundaries of the former standard regions , established in the 1940s for statistical purposes. The London region (also known as Greater London ) has a directly elected Mayor and Assembly . Six regions have local authority leaders\' boards to assist with correlating the headline policies of local authorities. The remaining two regions no longer have any administrative functions, having abolished their regional local authority leaders' boards. In 1998, regional chambers were established in the eight regions outside of London, which produced strategic plans and recommendations to local authorities
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England
ENGLAND is a country that is part of the United Kingdom . It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain (which lies in the North Atlantic ) in its centre and south; and includes over 100 smaller islands such as the Isles of Scilly , and the Isle of Wight . The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles , one of the Germanic tribes who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England became a unified state in the 10th century, and since the Age of Discovery , which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider world. The English language , the Anglican Church , and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations
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NUTS 1 Statistical Regions Of England
The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard by Eurostat for referencing the subdivisions of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland for statistical purposes. The NUTS code for the UK is _UK_ and there are 12 first level regions within the State. As a country of the UK, there are 9 such regions in England . The standard is developed and regulated by the European Union (EU). The NUTS standard is instrumental in delivering the EU's Structural Funds . A hierarchy of three levels is established by Eurostat. The sub-structure corresponds to administrative divisions within the country. Formerly, the further NUTS divisions IV and V existed; these have now been replaced by LOCAL ADMINISTRATIVE UNITS (LAU-1 and LAU-2 respectively). Between 1994 and 2011, the nine regions had an administrative role in the implementation of UK Government policy, and as the areas covered by (mostly indirectly) elected bodies. CONTENTS * 1 List of regions * 2 Sub-structure of the regions * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links LIST OF REGIONSThe NUTS 1 statistical regions correspond with the regions of England as used by the UK's Office for National Statistics . * UKC. North East * UKD. North West * UKE. Yorkshire and the Humber * UKF. East Midlands * UKG. West Midlands * UKH. East of England * UKI
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European Parliament Constituency
This article is part of a series on the politics and government of the European Union EXECUTIVE * Juncker Commission President Juncker (EPP) * Vice Presidents * College * Civil Service Secretary-General Italianer LEGISLATIVE PARLIAMENT President Tajani (EPP) * Largest groups; * EPP (Manfred Weber) * S">(Gianni Pittella) * 8th session (2014-19) * 751 MEPs * Bureau * Vice Presidents * Quaestor * Conference * Legislative procedure COUNCIL OF THE EU Presidency * Configurations * General * Foreign * Justice and Home * Economic * Euro * Legislative procedure * Voting * Secretariat * Secretary-General * Uwe Corsepius * Directorates-general * COREPER JUDICIARY * Court of Justice * Members * Rulings * General Court CENTRAL BANK President Draghi * ESCB * Euro * EMU * Eurozone COURT OF AUDITORS * Budget * OLAF OTHER BODIES * Agencies * Investment Bank * CoR * EESC * Ombudsman * National parliaments POLICIES AND ISSUES FOREIGN RELATIONS * High Representative * Federica Mogherini * Ext
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Local Authority Leaders' Board
LOCAL AUTHORITY LEADERS\' BOARDS are voluntary regional associations of council leaders that have been established in England
England
outside of Greater London
Greater London
to replace certain functions of the now abolished regional chambers . The establishment of the boards was part of the UK Government 's Review of Sub-National Economic Development and Regeneration. which brought forward the Government's plans to alter the structure of regional governance in England
England
and was mandated by the Local Democracy, Economic Development and Construction Act 2009 . In June 2010, the new Conservative - LibDem
LibDem
coalition government announced plans to remove funding from the new boards and to remove their statutory functions. It was indicated that the boards might continue as voluntary associations of council leaders. The remaining four areas of the UK have similar voluntary or mandated associations: London Councils , the Welsh Local Government Association , the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities and the Northern Ireland Local Government Association
Local Government Association

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Greater London Authority
The GREATER LONDON AUTHORITY (GLA) is a top-tier administrative body for Greater London , England. It consists of a directly elected executive Mayor of London , currently Sadiq Khan , and an elected 25-member London Assembly with scrutiny powers. The authority was established in 2000, following a local referendum , and derives most of its powers from the Greater London Authority Act 1999 and the Greater London Authority Act 2007 . It is a strategic regional authority, with powers over transport, policing, economic development, and fire and emergency planning. Three functional bodies — Transport for London , the Mayor\'s Office for Policing and Crime , and London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority — are responsible for delivery of services in these areas. The planning policies of the Mayor of London are detailed in a statutory London Plan that is regularly updated and published. The Greater London Authority is mostly funded by direct government grant and it is also a precepting authority, with some money collected with local Council Tax . The GLA is unique in the British local government system, in terms of structure, elections and selection of powers
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Non-metropolitan County
A NON-METROPOLITAN COUNTY, or colloquially, SHIRE COUNTY, is a county-level entity in England
England
that is not a metropolitan county . The counties typically have populations of 300,000 to 1.4 million. The term shire county is, however, an unofficial usage. Many of the non-metropolitan counties bear historic names and most end in the suffix "-shire " such as Wiltshire
Wiltshire
or Staffordshire
Staffordshire
. Of the remainder, some counties had the -shire ending and have lost it over time; such as Devon
Devon
and Somerset
Somerset
. " Shire
Shire
county" is, strictly, a dual-language tautology since the French -derived "county " means the same as the older Anglo-Saxon word "shire ". CONTENTS * 1 Origins * 2 Changes * 2.1 1995–1998 * 2.2 2009 * 3 List of non-metropolitan counties * 4 Wales * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links ORIGINSPrior to 1974 local government had been divided between single-tier county boroughs (the largest towns and cities) and two-tier administrative counties which were subdivided into municipal boroughs and urban and rural districts . The Local Government Act 1972 , which came into effect on 1 April 1974, divided England
England
outside Greater London and the six largest conurbations into thirty-nine non-metropolitan counties
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Metropolitan County
The METROPOLITAN COUNTIES are a type of county-level administrative division of England. There are six metropolitan counties, which each cover large urban areas, typically with populations of 1.2 to 2.8 million. They were created in 1972 and are each divided into several metropolitan districts or boroughs . The metropolitan county councils were abolished in 1986 with most of their functions being devolved to the individual boroughs, making them _de facto_ unitary authorities . The remaining functions were taken over by joint boards. The metropolitan counties have population densities of between 800 ( South Yorkshire ) and 2,800 (West Midlands ) people/km². Individual metropolitan districts range from 4,000 people/km² in Liverpool to only 500 people/km² in Doncaster . Today, residents of metropolitan counties account for around 22% of the population of England , or 18% of the United Kingdom
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Politics Of England
The POLITICS OF ENGLAND forms the major part of the wider politics of the United Kingdom , with England being more populous than all the other countries of the United Kingdom put together. As England is also by far the largest in terms of area and GDP, its relationship to the UK is somewhat different from that of Scotland , Wales or Northern Ireland . The English capital London is also the capital of the UK, and English is the dominant language of the UK (not officially, but _de facto_). Dicey and Morris (p26) list the separate states in the British Islands . "England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, the Isle of Man , Jersey , Guernsey , Alderney , and Sark .... is a separate country in the sense of the conflict of laws , though not one of them is a State known to public international law." But this may be varied by statute. The United Kingdom is one state for the purposes of the Bills of Exchange Act 1882. Great Britain is a single state for the purposes of the Companies Act 1985 . Traditionally authors referred to the legal unit or state of England and Wales as "England" although this usage is becoming politically unacceptable in the last few decades
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Governance Of England
There has not been a GOVERNMENT OF ENGLAND since 1707 when the Kingdom of England ceased to exist as a sovereign state , as it merged with the Kingdom of Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain . Kingdom of Great Britain continued from 1707 until 1801 when it merged with the Kingdom of Ireland to form the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland , which itself became the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (UK) in 1922 (in reality ; in name in 1927 ) upon independence for most of the island of Ireland. The UK since then has gone through significant change to its system of government, with devolved parliaments, assemblies and governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland . England, however, remains under the full jurisdiction, on all matters, of the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the UK government as no devolved administration has been created for England within the new structure. This situation has led to the anomaly, known as the West Lothian question , which is that Scottish Members of Parliament (MPs) are able to vote on legislation that affects only England whereas English MPs can not vote on certain Scottish matters due to devolution
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Monarchy Of The United Kingdom
The MONARCHY OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, commonly referred to as the BRITISH MONARCHY, is the constitutional monarchy of the United Kingdom , its dependencies and its overseas territories . The current monarch and head of state, Queen Elizabeth II , ascended the throne on the death of her father, King George VI , on 6 February 1952. The monarch and his or her immediate family undertake various official, ceremonial, diplomatic and representational duties. As the monarchy is constitutional, the monarch is limited to non-partisan functions such as bestowing honours and appointing the Prime Minister . The monarch is, by tradition, commander-in-chief of the British Armed Forces . Though the ultimate formal executive authority over the government of the United Kingdom is still by and through the monarch's royal prerogative , these powers may only be used according to laws enacted in Parliament and, in practice, within the constraints of convention and precedent . The British monarchy traces its origins from the petty kingdoms of early medieval Scotland and Anglo-Saxon England , which consolidated into the kingdoms of England and Scotland by the 10th century AD
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Elizabeth II
ELIZABETH II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926 ) has been Queen of the United Kingdom , Canada , Australia , and New Zealand since 6 February 1952. Additionally, she is Head of the Commonwealth and Queen of 12 countries that have become independent since her accession: Jamaica , Barbados , the Bahamas , Grenada , Papua New Guinea , Solomon Islands , Tuvalu , Saint Lucia , Saint Vincent and the Grenadines , Belize , Antigua and Barbuda , and Saint Kitts and Nevis . Elizabeth was born in London as the elder child of the Duke and Duchess of York, later King George VI and Queen Elizabeth , and she was educated privately at home. Her father acceded to the throne on the abdication of his brother Edward VIII in 1936, from which time she was the heir presumptive . She began to undertake public duties during the Second World War , serving in the Auxiliary Territorial Service . In 1947, she married Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh , a former prince of Greece and Denmark, with whom she has four children: Charles, Prince of Wales ; Anne, Princess Royal ; Prince Andrew, Duke of York ; and Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex
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Minister (government)
A MINISTER is a politician who holds public office in a national or regional government , making and implementing decisions on policies in conjunction with the other ministers. In some jurisdictions the head of government is also a Minister and is designated the "prime minister ", "premier", "chief minister", "Chancellor" or other title. In Commonwealth realm jurisdictions which use the Westminster system of government, Ministers are usually required to be members of one of the houses of Parliament
Parliament
or legislature , and are usually from the political party that controls a majority in the lower house of the legislature. In other jurisdictions — such as Belgium
Belgium
, Mexico
Mexico
, Netherlands
Netherlands
, Philippines
Philippines
, United States
United States
— the holder of a cabinet-level post or other government official is not permitted to be a member of the legislature. Depending on the administrative arrangements in each jurisdiction, Ministers are usually heads of a government department and members of the government's Ministry, Cabinet and perhaps of a Committee of Cabinet. Some Ministers may be more senior than others, and some hold the title "Assistant Minister". Some jurisdictions, with a large number of Ministers, may designate Ministers to be either in the Inner or Outer Ministry or Cabinet
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Departments Of The United Kingdom Government
The Government of the United Kingdom exercises its executive authority through a number of government departments or departments of state. A department is composed of employed officials, known as civil servants , and is politically accountable through a minister . Most major departments are headed by a secretary of state , who sits in the cabinet , and typically supported by a team of junior ministers. There are also a number of non-ministerial departments. These are headed by senior civil servants, but are linked to a ministerial department through whose ministers they are accountable to Parliament . Departments serve to implement the policies of Her Majesty's Government, regardless of the government's political composition. As a consequence, officials within government departments are generally required to adhere to varying levels of political impartiality and neutrality. CONTENTS * 1 Types * 2 List * 2.1 Ministerial departments * 2.2 Non-ministerial departments * 3 List of executive agencies reporting to each department of the British government * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links TYPESThere are two types of government departments. Ministerial departments are led politically by a government minister , normally a member of the cabinet and cover matters that require direct political oversight. For most departments, the government minister in question is known as a _secretary of state _
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Government Of The United Kingdom
HER MAJESTY\'S GOVERNMENT (HMG; Welsh : _Llywodraeth Ei Mawrhydi_), commonly referred to as the UK GOVERNMENT or BRITISH GOVERNMENT, is the central government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland . The government is led by the Prime Minister , who selects all the remaining ministers . The prime minister and the other most senior ministers belong to the supreme decision-making committee, known as the Cabinet . The government ministers all sit in Parliament , and are accountable to it. The government is dependent on Parliament to make primary legislation , and since the Fixed-terms Parliaments Act 2011 , general elections are held every five years to elect a new House of Commons , unless there is a successful vote of no confidence in the government or a two-thirds vote for a snap election (as was the case in 2017 ) in the House of Commons, in which case an election may be held sooner. After an election, the monarch (currently Queen Elizabeth II ) selects as prime minister the leader of the party most likely to command a majority of MPs in the House of Commons. Under the uncodified British constitution , executive authority lies with the monarch, although this authority is exercised only by, or on the advice of, the prime minister and the cabinet. The Cabinet members advise the monarch as members of the Privy Council . They also exercise power directly as leaders of the Government Departments
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