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Redlynch, Somerset
Redlynch is a village in the civil parish of Bruton
Bruton
within the South Somerset
Somerset
district of Somerset, England.Contents1 Heritage 2 House and gardens 3 Church 4 References 5 External linksHeritage[edit] In the mid-12th century Redlynch belonged to Henry Lovel of Castle Cary.[1] It was later part of the hundred of Bruton.[2] Helena Snakenborg, a lady-in-waiting to Queen Elizabeth I and widow of both William Parr, the Marquis of Northampton, and of Sir Thomas Gorges, died at the age of 86 on 10 April 1635 at Redlynch, the residence of her son, Sir Robert Gorges. She was buried on 14 May in Salisbury Cathedral. House and gardens[edit] The formal gardens of Redlynch Park, which surrounds Redlynch House, were developed in 1740 on the estate founded by Sir Stephen Fox, paymaster-general to Charles II
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Somerset
Somerset
Somerset
(/ˈsʌmərsɛt/ ( listen)) (or archaically, Somersetshire) is a county in South West England
England
which borders Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
and Bristol
Bristol
to the north, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to the east, Dorset
Dorset
to the south-east and Devon
Devon
to the south-west. It is bounded to the north and west by the Severn Estuary
Severn Estuary
and the Bristol
Bristol
Channel, its coastline facing southeastern Wales
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Summer House
A summer house or summerhouse has traditionally referred to a building or shelter used for relaxation in warm weather.[1] This would often take the form of a small, roofed building on the grounds of a larger one, but could also be built in a garden or park, often designed to provide cool shady places of relaxation or retreat from the summer heat. It can also refer to a second residence, usually located in the country, that provides a cool and relaxing home to live during the summer, such as a vacation property.Contents1 In the Nordic countries 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksIn the Nordic countries[edit]Summerhouse of the Swedish scientist, philosopher, and theologian Emanuel Swedenborg
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Civil Parish
In England, a civil parish is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. It is an administrative parish, in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish. A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch. Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council. Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish
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Castle Cary
Castle Cary
Castle Cary
(/ˌkɑːsəl ˈkɛəri/)* is a small market town and civil parish in south Somerset, England, 5 miles (8 km) north west of Wincanton
Wincanton
and 8 miles (12.9 km) south of Shepton Mallet. The parish includes the hamlet of Dimmer. The town is situated at the foot of Lodge Hill and on the River Cary, a tributary of the Parrett.Castle Cary, Somerset
Somerset
and Castlecary, Lanarkshire, differ in local pronunciation. The former is /ˌkɑːsəl ˈkɛəri/ and the latter is /ˌkɑsəl ˈkeri/.Contents1 History1.1 May 2008 flooding2 Governance 3 Transport 4 Landmarks 5 Religious sites 6 Notable residents 7 Education 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The site of Cary Castle
Cary Castle
is above the town. It was built either by Walter of Douai or by the following owners, the Perceval family, after the Norman conquest
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Hundred (county Subdivision)
A hundred is an administrative division that is geographically part of a larger region. It was formerly used in England, Wales, some parts of the United States, Denmark, Southern Schleswig, Sweden, Finland, Estonia
Estonia
and Norway
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Stephen Fox
Sir Stephen Fox
Stephen Fox
(27 March 1627 – 28 October 1716) was an English politician. Life[edit] Stephen Fox
Stephen Fox
was the son of William Fox, of Farley, in Wiltshire, a yeoman farmer. Stephen was a Chorister of Salisbury Cathedral
Salisbury Cathedral
(c.1634 – c.1640) (Noted in John Evelyn’s Diary as ‘…a poore boy from the quire of Salisbury’ ). At the age of fifteen he first obtained a post in the household of Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland; then he entered the service of Lord Percy, the earl's brother, and was present with the royalist army at the Battle of Worcester
Battle of Worcester
as Lord Percy's deputy at the ordnance board. Accompanying Charles II in his flight to the continent, he was appointed manager of the royal household, on the recommendation of Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon
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Charles II Of England
Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685)[c] was king of England, Scotland and Ireland. He was king of Scotland from 1649 until his deposition in 1651, and king of England, Scotland and Ireland from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 until his death. Charles II's father, Charles I, was executed at Whitehall on 30 January 1649, at the climax of the English Civil War. Although the Parliament of Scotland
Parliament of Scotland
proclaimed Charles II king on 5 February 1649, England entered the period known as the English Interregnum or the English Commonwealth, and the country was a de facto republic, led by Oliver Cromwell. Cromwell defeated Charles II at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651, and Charles fled to mainland Europe. Cromwell became virtual dictator of England, Scotland and Ireland, and Charles spent the next nine years in exile in France, the Dutch Republic and the Spanish Netherlands
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Edwin Lutyens
Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens, OM, KCIE, PRA, FRIBA (/ˈlʌtjənz/; LUT-yənz; 29 March 1869 – 1 January 1944) was an English architect known for imaginatively adapting traditional architectural styles to the requirements of his era. He designed many English country houses, war memorials and public buildings. In his biography, the writer Christopher Hussey wrote, "In his lifetime (Lutyens) was widely held to be our greatest architect since Wren if not, as many maintained, his superior".[2] The architectural historian Gavin Stamp described him as "surely the greatest British architect of the twentieth (or of any other) century".[3] Lutyens played an instrumental role in designing and building New Delhi, which would later on serve as the seat of the Government of India.[4] In recognition of his contribution, New Delhi
New Delhi
is also known as "Lutyens' Delhi"
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Earl Of Ilchester
Earl of Ilchester
Earl of Ilchester
is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1756 for Stephen Fox, 1st Baron Ilchester, who had previously represented Shaftesbury in Parliament. He had already been created Baron Ilchester, of Ilchester in the County of Somerset in 1741, and Baron Ilchester and Stavordale, of Redlynch, in the County of Somerset, in 1747. These titles were also in the Peerage of Great Britain. All three peerages were created with remainder, failing heirs male of his own, to his younger brother Henry Fox, who was himself created Baron Holland
Baron Holland
in 1763. The brothers were the only sons from the second marriage of the politician Sir Stephen Fox. In 1758 the first Earl assumed by Royal licence the additional surname of Strangways, which was the maiden name of his wife's maternal grandmother. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Earl. He represented Midhurst in Parliament
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Henry Fox-Strangways, 2nd Earl Of Ilchester
Henry Thomas Fox-Strangways, 2nd Earl of Ilchester
Earl of Ilchester
(10 August 1747 – 5 September 1802), known as Lord Stavordale from 1756 to 1776, was a British peer and Member of Parliament. Ilchester was the eldest son of Stephen Fox-Strangways, 1st Earl of Ilchester, and his wife, the former Elizabeth Horner. Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland, was his uncle. He was elected to the House of Commons for Midhurst in 1768 (along with his cousin Charles James Fox), a seat he retained until 1774. Two years later he succeeded his father as second Earl of Ilchester
Earl of Ilchester
and took his seat in the House of Lords. Lord Ilchester married, firstly, Mary Theresa O'Grady, daughter of Standish O'Grady, in 1772. After his first wife's death in 1792 he married, secondly, Maria Digby, daughter of William Digby, in 1794, with whom his third son was John Fox-Strangways
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Orangery
An orangery or orangerie was a room or a dedicated building on the grounds of fashionable residences from the 17th to the 19th centuries where orange and other fruit trees were protected during the winter, similar to a greenhouse or conservatory.[1] The orangery provided a luxurious extension of the normal range and season of woody plants, extending the protection which had long been afforded by the warmth offered from a masonry fruit wall.[2] A century after the use for orange and lime trees had been established, other varieties of tender plants, shrubs and exotic plants also came to be housed in the orangery, which often gained a stove for the upkeep of these delicate plants in the cold winters of northern Europe
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Kitchen Garden
The traditional kitchen garden, also known as a potager (in French, jardin potager) or in Scotland a kailyaird,[1] is a space separate from the rest of the residential garden – the ornamental plants and lawn areas. Most vegetable gardens are still miniature versions of old family farm plots, but the kitchen garden is different not only in its history, but also its design. The kitchen garden may serve as the central feature of an ornamental, all-season landscape, or it may be little more than a humble vegetable plot
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Heritage At Risk Register
Heritage at Risk are heritage assets, such as listed buildings, or scheduled monuments that are at risk as a result of neglect, decay or inappropriate development, or are vulnerable to becoming so. In England, an annual Heritage at Risk Register is published by Historic England
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English Heritage
English Heritage
English Heritage
(officially the English Heritage
English Heritage
Trust) is a registered charity that manages the National Heritage Collection.[3] This comprises over 400 of England's historic buildings, monuments and sites spanning more than 5,000 years of history. Within its portfolio are Stonehenge, Dover Castle, Tintagel Castle
Tintagel Castle
and the best preserved parts of Hadrian's Wall
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