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Red Channels
Red Channels: The Report of Communist
Communist
Influence in Radio and Television was an anti- Communist
Communist
tract published in the United States at the start of the Red Scare. Issued by the right-wing journal Counterattack on June 22, 1950, the pamphlet-style book names 151 actors, writers, musicians, broadcast journalists, and others in the context of purported Communist
Communist
manipulation of the entertainment industry. Some of the 151 were already being denied employment because of their political beliefs, history, or association with suspected subversives
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Counterattack (newsletter)
A counterattack is a tactic employed in response to an attack, with the term originating in "war games".[1] The general objective is to negate or thwart the advantage gained by the enemy during attack, while the specific objectives typically seek to regain lost ground or destroy the attacking enemy (this may take the form of an opposing sports team or military units).[1][2][3] A saying, attributed to Napoleon Bonaparte illustrate the tactical importance of the counterattack : "the greatest danger occurs at the moment of victory". In the same spirit, in his Battle Studies, Ardant du Pic noticed that "he, general or mere captain, who employs every one in the storming of a position can be sure of seeing it retaken by an organised counter-attack of four men and a corporal".[4] A counterattack is a military tactic that occurs when one side successfully defends off the enemy’s attack and begins to push the enemy back with an attack of its own
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Pete Seeger
Peter Seeger (May 3, 1919 – January 27, 2014) was an American folk singer and social activist. A fixture on nationwide radio in the 1940s, he also had a string of hit records during the early 1950s as a member of the Weavers, most notably their recording of Lead Belly's "Goodnight, Irene", which topped the charts for 13 weeks in 1950. Members of the Weavers were blacklisted during the McCarthy Era
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Anti-communism
Anti-communism
Anti-communism
is opposition to communism. Organized anti-communism developed after the 1917 October Revolution
Revolution
in Russia and it reached global dimensions during the Cold War, when the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
engaged in an intense rivalry. Anti-communism
Anti-communism
has been an element of movements holding many different political positions, including nationalist, social democratic, liberal, conservative, fascist, capitalist, anarchist and even socialist viewpoints. The first organization specifically dedicated to opposing communism was the Russian White movement, which fought in the Russian Civil War starting in 1918 against the recently established Communist government
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Spanish Civil War
Nationalist victoryEnd of the Second Spanish Republic Establishment of a military dictatorship under the rule of Francisco FrancoBelligerents Republicans Spanish Republican Army Popular Front CNT-FAI UGT Generalitat de Catalunya Euzko Gudarostea
Euzko Gudarostea
(1936–37)Supported by:Communist International  Soviet Union  Mexico International Brigades Nationalists FET y de las JONS (from 1937) FE de la JONS (1936–37) CT (1936–37) CEDA (1936–37) RE (1936–37)Supporte
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Communist
In political and social sciences, communism (from Latin
Latin
communis, "common, universal")[1][2] is the philosophical, social, political, and economic ideology and movement whose ultimate goal is the establishment of the communist society, which is a socioeconomic order structured upon the common ownership of the means of production and the absence of social classes, money[3][4] and the state.[5][6] Communism
Communism
includes a variety of schools of thought, which broadly include Marxism
Marxism
and anarchism (anarcho-communism), as well as the political ideologies grouped around both. All of these share the analysis that the current order of society stems from its economic system, capitalism; that in this system there are two major social classes; that conflict between these two classes is the root of all problems in society; and that this situation will ultimately be resolved through a social revolution
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General Foods
General Foods
General Foods
Corporation was a company whose direct predecessor was established in the USA by Charles William Post as the Postum
Postum
Cereal Company in 1895. The name General Foods
General Foods
was adopted in 1929, after several corporate acquisitions. In November 1985, General Foods
General Foods
was acquired by Philip Morris Companies (now Altria
Altria
Group, Inc.) for $5.6 billion, the largest non-oil acquisition to that time. In December 1988, Philip Morris acquired Kraft, Inc., and, in 1990, combined the two food companies as Kraft General Foods
Kraft General Foods
(KGF)
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Edward G. Robinson
Edward G. Robinson
Edward G. Robinson
(born Emanuel Goldenberg; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was an American actor, born in Romania,[1] who was popular star on stage and screen during Hollywood's Golden Age. He appeared in 40 Broadway plays and more than 100 films during a 50-year career[2] and is best remembered for his tough-guy roles as a gangster, such as his star-making films, Little Caesar and Key Largo. During the 1930s and 1940s, he was an outspoken public critic of fascism and Nazism, which were first growing in strength in Europe and led up to World War II. His activism included contributing over $250,000 to more than 850 organizations involved in war relief, along with cultural, educational and religious groups
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Lillian Hellman
Lillian Florence Hellman (June 20, 1905 – June 30, 1984) was an American dramatist and screenwriter known for her success as a playwright on Broadway, as well as her left-wing sympathies and political activism. She was blacklisted after her appearance before the House Committee on Un-American Activities
House Committee on Un-American Activities
(HUAC) at the height of the anti-communist campaigns of 1947–52. Although she continued to work on Broadway in the 1950s, her blacklisting by the American film industry caused a drop in her income. Many praised Hellman for refusing to answer questions by HUAC, but others believed, despite her denial, that she had belonged to the Communist Party. As a playwright, Hellman had many successes on Broadway, including Watch on the Rhine, The Autumn Garden, Toys in the Attic, Another Part of the Forest, The Children's Hour and The Little Foxes
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J. B. Matthews
Joseph Brown "Doc" Matthews, Sr. (1894–1966), best known as J. B. Matthews, was an American linguist, educator, writer, and political activist. A committed pacifist, he became a self-described "fellow traveler" of the Communist Party, USA in the middle-1930s, achieving national prominence as a leader of a number of the party's so-called "mass organizations." Disillusionment with communism led to anti-communist testimony before the Dies Committee in 1938. He then served as chief investigator for the House Committee on Un-American Activities, headed by Martin Dies, Jr., consultant on Communist affairs for the Hearst Corporation, and by June 1953 research director for Joseph McCarthy's Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations of the United States Senate
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Burgess Meredith
Oliver Burgess Meredith
Burgess Meredith
(November 16, 1907[2][3] – September 9, 1997[4]) was an American actor, director, producer, and writer. Active for more than six decades,[5] Meredith has been called "a virtuosic actor"[2] and "one of the most accomplished actors of the century".[6] A life member of the Actors Studio[7] by invitation,[8] he won several Emmys,[9] was the first male actor to win the Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actor twice, and was nominated for two Academy Awards.[9] He established himself as a leading man in Hollywood
Hollywood
with critically acclaimed performances as George Milton in Of Mice and Men
Of Mice and Men
(1939), Ernie Pyle
Ernie Pyle
in The Story of G.I. Joe
The Story of G.I

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Joseph McCarthy
Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 14, 1908 – May 2, 1957) was an American politician who served as U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin
Wisconsin
from 1947 until his death in 1957. Beginning in 1950, McCarthy became the most visible public face of a period in the United States in which Cold War
Cold War
tensions fueled fears of widespread Communist subversion.[1] He is known for alleging that numerous Communists and Soviet spies and sympathizers had infiltrated the United States federal government, universities, film industry, and elsewhere. Ultimately, the smear tactics that he used led him to be censured by the U.S. Senate. The term "McCarthyism", coined in 1950 in reference to McCarthy's practices, was soon applied to similar anti-communist activities
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John Henry Faulk
John Henry Faulk (August 21, 1913 – April 9, 1990), from Austin, Texas, was a storyteller and radio show host. His successful lawsuit against the entertainment industry helped to bring an end to the Hollywood blacklist.Contents1 Early life 2 Education and military service 3 Career 4 Blacklist controversy 5 Personal life and death 6 Awards and tributes 7 Film and television credits7.1 Film 7.2 Television8 Discography 9 Radio appearances and speeches 10 Bibliography 11 Plays 12 Further reading 13 References 14 Additional sourcing 15 External linksEarly life[edit] John Henry Faulk was born in Austin, to Methodist parents Henry Faulk and his wife Martha Miner Faulk. John Henry had four siblings: Hamilton Faulk (1905–1992),[1] Martha Stansbury (1908–2005), Mary Faulk Koock (1910–1996),[2] and Texana Faulk Conn (1915–2006).[3][4] Faulk spent his childhood years in Austin in the noted Victorian house Green Pastures
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Sic
The Latin
Latin
adverb sic ("thus", "just as"; in full: sic erat scriptum, "thus was it written")[1] inserted after a quoted word or passage indicates that the quoted matter has been transcribed exactly as found in the source text, complete with any erroneous or archaic spelling, surprising assertion, faulty reasoning, or other matter that might otherwise be taken as an error of transcription. The usual usage is to inform the reader that any errors or apparent errors in quoted material do not arise from errors in the course of the transcription, but are intentionally reproduced, exactly as they appear in the source text
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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