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Recycling
Recycling
Recycling
is the process of converting waste materials into new materials and objects
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Governments
A government is the system or group of people governing an organized community, often a state.[1] In the case of its broad associative definition, government normally consists of legislature, executive, and judiciary. Government
Government
is a means by which state policies are enforced, as well as a mechanism for determining the policy. Each government has a kind of constitution, a statement of its governing principles and philosophy. Typically the philosophy chosen is some balance between the principle of individual freedom and the idea of absolute state authority (tyranny). While all types of organizations have governance, the word government is often used more specifically to refer to the approximately 200 independent national governments on Earth, as well as subsidiary organizations.[2] Historically prevalent forms of government include aristocracy, timocracy, oligarchy, democracy, theocracy and tyranny
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Thermostat
A thermostat is a component which senses the temperature of a system so that the system's temperature is maintained near a desired setpoint. Thermostats are used in any device or system that heats or cools to a setpoint temperature, examples include building heating, central heating, air conditioners, HVAC
HVAC
systems, water heaters, as well as kitchen equipment including ovens and refrigerators and medical and scientific incubators
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Pre-industrial
Pre-industrial society refers to social attributes and forms of political and cultural organization that were prevalent before the advent of the Industrial Revolution, which occurred from 1750 to 1850. Pre-industrial is a time before there were machines and tools to help perform tasks en masse. Pre-industrial civilization dates back to centuries ago, but the main era known as the Pre-Industrial Society occurred right before the industrial society. Pre-Industrial societies vary from region to region depending on the culture of a given area or history of social and political life. Europe is known for its feudal system and Medieval era.Contents1 Attributes 2 Economic systems2.1 Labour conditions2.1.1 Social structure and working conditions3 See also 4 References 5 BibliographyAttributes[edit]Limited production Extreme agricultural economy Limited division of labor
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Benjamin Law (inventor)
Benjamin Law was born around 1773 in Gomersal, Yorkshire
Yorkshire
the son of George Law and Mary Wilby. He is credited by many authors as the inventor of the shoddy process. Benjamin Law set up his business at Howley Mill. A memorial to Benjamin Law is in the grounds of Batley
Batley
Parish Church. An exhibition of "shoddy art", challenging misconceptions about disabled people, was held in Batley
Batley
in May 2016. The history of the shoddy process was the conceptual starting point for the disabled artists, who used recycled and reused textile materials in their artworks. The exhibition was first shown in Leeds, and was chosen to tour in Batley, given that it is shoddy's birthplace.[1] References[edit]^ "Exhibition putting the shine back into shoddy". Huddersfield Examiner. 31 May 2016
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Wool
Wool
Wool
is the textile fiber obtained from sheep and other animals, including cashmere and mohair from goats, qiviut from muskoxen, angora from rabbits, and other types of wool from camelids.[1] Wool
Wool
mainly consists of protein together with a few percent lipids. In this regard it is chemically quite distinct from the more dominant textile, cotton, which is mainly cellulose.[1]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Processing2.1 Shearing 2.2 Scouring3 Fineness and yield 4 History 5 Production 6 Marketing6.1 Australia 6.2 Other countries7 Yarn 8 Uses 9 Events 10 See also10.1 Production 10.2 Processing 10.3 Refined products 10.4 Organizations 10.5 Miscellaneous wool11 References 12 External linksCharacteristics[edit]Champion hogget fleece, Walcha Show Wool
Wool
is produced by follicles which are small cells located in the skin
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West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
Yorkshire
is a metropolitan county in England. It is an inland and in relative terms upland county having eastward-draining valleys while taking in moors of the Pennines
Pennines
and has a population of 2.2 million
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Schweppes
Schweppes
Schweppes
(/ʃwɛps/[1][2][3]) is a beverage brand that is sold around the world. It includes a variety of lemonade, carbonated waters and ginger ales.Contents1 History 2 Marketing 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]An 1883 advertisement for Schweppe's Mineral-WatersIn the late eighteenth century, Johann Jacob Schweppe
Johann Jacob Schweppe
developed a process to manufacture carbonated mineral water based on the discoveries of Joseph Priestley. Schweppe founded the Schweppes Company in Geneva
Geneva
in 1783 to sell carbonated water.[4] In 1792, he moved to London
London
to develop the business there
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Bakelite
Bakelite
Bakelite
(/ˈbeɪkəlaɪt/ BAY-kə-lyt, sometimes spelled Baekelite), or polyoxybenzylmethyleneglycolanhydride, is an early plastic. It is a thermosetting phenol formaldehyde resin, formed from a condensation reaction of phenol with formaldehyde. It was developed by the Belgian-American chemist Leo Baekeland
Leo Baekeland
in Yonkers, New York, in 1907. One of the first plastics made from synthetic components, Bakelite
Bakelite
was used for its electrical nonconductivity and heat-resistant properties in electrical insulators, radio and telephone casings and such diverse products as kitchenware, jewelry, pipe stems, children's toys, and firearms
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Circuit Board
A printed circuit board (PCB) mechanically supports and electrically connects electronic components or electrical components using conductive tracks, pads and other features etched from one or more sheet layers of copper laminated onto and/or between sheet layers of a non-conductive substrate. Components are generally soldered onto the PCB to both electrically connect and mechanically fasten them to it. Printed circuit boards are used in all but the simplest electronic products. They are also used in some electrical products, such as passive switch boxes. Alternatives to PCBs include wire wrap and point-to-point construction, both once popular but now rarely used. PCBs require additional design effort to lay out the circuit, but manufacturing and assembly can be automated. Specialized CAD software is available to do much of the work of layout. Mass-producing circuits with PCBs is cheaper and faster than with other wiring methods, as components are mounted and wired in one operation
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World War
A world war, is a large-scale war involving many of the countries of the world or many of the most powerful and populous ones. World wars span multiple countries on multiple continents, with battles fought in many theaters
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Salvage For Victory
The Salvage for Victory campaign was a program launched by the US Federal Government in 1942 to salvage materials for the American war effort in World War II.[1] On January 10, 1942, the US Office of Production Management sent pledge cards to retail stores asking them to participate in the effort by saving things like waste paper, scrap metal, old rags, and rubber.[2] Later that month, the Bureau of Industrial Conservation of the War Production Board asked all American mayors to salvage the same kinds of materials from municipal dumps and incinerators.[3] In New York City, the Department of Sanitation began picking up materials collected for the drive outside of homes and apartment buildings at 11:00 am Sunday mornings.[4] References[edit]^ Foertsch, Jacqueline (2008). American Culture in the 1940s. Edinburgh University Press. p. xvi. ISBN 978-0-7486-2413-3.  ^ "OPM Enlists Retailers in Waste Drive; Many Civilian Lead Uses Banned by Agency". The New York Times
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European Union
The European Union
European Union
(EU) is a political and economic union of 28 member states that are located primarily in Europe. It has an area of 4,475,757 km2 (1,728,099 sq mi), and an estimated population of over 510 million. The EU has developed an internal single market through a standardised system of laws that apply in all member states
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