HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Recoil
Recoil
Recoil
(often called knockback, kickback or simply kick) is the backward movement of a gun when it is discharged. In technical terms, the recoil momentum acquired by the gun exactly balances the forward momentum of the projectile and exhaust gases (ejecta), according to Newton's third law, known as conservation of momentum. In hand-held small arms, the recoil momentum is transferred to the ground through the body of the shooter; while in heavier guns such as mounted machine guns or cannons, recoil momentum is transferred to the ground through the mount. In order to bring the rearward moving gun to a halt, the momentum acquired by the gun is dissipated by a forward acting counter-recoil force applied to the gun over a period of time after the projectile exits the muzzle
[...More...]

"Recoil" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Momentum
In Newtonian mechanics, linear momentum, translational momentum, or simply momentum (pl. momenta) is the product of the mass and velocity of an object. It can be more generally stated as a measure of how hard it is to stop a moving object. It is a three-dimensional vector quantity, possessing a magnitude and a direction. If m is an object's mass and v is the velocity (also a vector), then the momentum is p = m v , displaystyle mathbf p =mmathbf v , In SI units, it is measured in kilogram meters per second (kg⋅m/s). Newton's second law
Newton's second law
of motion states that a body's rate of change in momentum is equal to the net force acting on it. Momentum
Momentum
depends on the frame of reference, but in any inertial frame it is a conserved quantity, meaning that if a closed system is not affected by external forces, its total linear momentum does not change
[...More...]

"Momentum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Work (physics)
W = F ⋅ s W = τ θPart of a series of articles aboutClassical mechanics F → = m a → displaystyle vec F =m vec a Second
Second
law of motionHistory TimelineBranchesApplied Celestial Continuum Dynamics Kinematics Kinetics Statics StatisticalFundamentalsAcceleration Angular momentum Couple D'Alembert's principle Energykinetic potentialForce Frame of reference Inertial frame of reference Impulse Inertia / Moment of inertia MassMechanical power Mechanical workMoment Mom
[...More...]

"Work (physics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Energy
In physics, energy is the quantitative property that must be transferred to an object in order to perform work on, or to heat, the object.[note 1] Energy
Energy
is a conserved quantity; the law of conservation of energy states that energy can be converted in form, but not created or destroyed. The SI unit of energy is the joule, which is the energy transferred to an object by the work of moving it a distance of 1 metre against a force of 1 newton. Common forms of energy include the kinetic energy of a moving object, the potential energy stored by an object's position in a force field (gravitational, electric or magnetic), the elastic energy stored by stretching solid objects, the chemical energy released when a fuel burns, the radiant energy carried by light, and the thermal energy due to an object's temperature. Mass
Mass
and energy are closely related
[...More...]

"Energy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Elastic Deformation
In materials science, deformation refers to any changes in the shape or size of an object due to-an applied force (the deformation energy in this case is transferred through work) or a change in temperature (the deformation energy in this case is transferred through heat).The first case can be a result of tensile (pulling) forces, compressive (pushing) forces, shear, bending or torsion (twisting). In the second case, the most significant factor, which is determined by the temperature, is the mobility of the structural defects such as grain boundaries, point vacancies, line and screw dislocations, stacking faults and twins in both crystalline and non-crystalline solids. The movement or displacement of such mobile defects is thermally activated, and thus limited by the rate of atomic diffusion.[1][2] Deformation is often described as strain. As deformation occurs, internal inter-molecular forces arise that oppose the applied force
[...More...]

"Elastic Deformation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kentucky Rifle
The long rifle, also known as longrifle, Kentucky
Kentucky
rifle, or Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
rifle, was one of the first commonly used rifles for hunting and warfare.[1] It is characterized by an unusually long barrel, which is widely believed to be a largely unique development of American rifles that was uncommon in European rifles of the same period. The longrifle is an early example of a firearm using rifling (spiral grooves in the bore)
[...More...]

"Kentucky Rifle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Equation
In mathematics, an equation is a statement of an equality containing one or more variables. Solving the equation consists of determining which values of the variables make the equality true. Variables are also called unknowns and the values of the unknowns which satisfy the equality are called solutions of the equation. There are two kinds of equations: identities and conditional equations. An identity is true for all values of the variable. A conditional equation is true for only particular values of the variables.[1][2] An equation is written as two expressions, connected by a equals sign ("="). The expressions on the two sides of the equals sign are called the "left-hand side" and "right-hand side" of the equation The most common type of equation is an algebraic equation, in which the two sides are algebraic expressions. Each side of an algebraic equation will contain one or more terms
[...More...]

"Equation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Newton's Laws Of Motion
Newton's laws of motion
Newton's laws of motion
are three physical laws that, together, laid the foundation for classical mechanics. They describe the relationship between a body and the forces acting upon it, and its motion in response to those forces. More precisely, the first law defines the force qualitatively, the second law offers a quantitative measure of the force, and the third asserts that a single isolated force doesn't exist. These three laws have been expressed in several ways, over nearly three centuries,[1] and can be summarised as follows:First law: In an inertial frame of reference, an object either remains at rest or continues to move at a constant velocity, unless acted upon by a force.[2][3]Second law: In an inertial reference frame, the vector sum of the forces F on an object is equal to the mass m of that object multiplied by the acceleration a of the object: F = ma
[...More...]

"Newton's Laws Of Motion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Joule
The joule (/dʒuːl/); (symbol: J), is a derived unit of energy in the International System of Units.[1] It is equal to the energy transferred to (or work done on) an object when a force of one newton acts on that object in the direction of its motion through a distance of one metre (1 newton metre or N⋅m). It is also the energy dissipated as heat when an electric current of one ampere passes through a resistance of one ohm for one second
[...More...]

"Joule" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Foot-pound (energy)
The foot-pound force (symbol: ft⋅lbf or ft⋅lb)[1] is a unit of work or energy in the Engineering and Gravitational Systems in United States customary and imperial units of measure. It is the energy transferred upon applying a force of one pound-force (lbf) through a linear displacement of one foot. The corresponding SI unit is the joule.Contents1 Usage 2 Conversion to other units2.1 Energy
Energy
units 2.2 Power units3 See also 4 ReferencesUsage[edit] The foot-pound is often used to specify the muzzle energy of a bullet in small arms ballistics, particularly in the United States. "Foot-pound" is sometimes also used as a unit of torque (see pound-foot (torque)). In the United States this unit is often used to specify, for example, the tightness of a bolt or the output of an engine. Although they are dimensionally equivalent, energy (a scalar) and torque (a vector) are distinct physical quantities
[...More...]

"Foot-pound (energy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Potential Energy
U = m · g · h (gravitational) U = ½ · k · x2 U = ½ · C · V2 (electric) U = -m · B (magnetic)Part of a series of articles aboutClassical mechanics F → = m a → displaystyle vec F =m vec a Second law of motionHistory TimelineBranchesApplied Celestial Continuum Dynamics Kinematics Kinetics Statics StatisticalFundamentalsAcceleration Angular momentum Couple D'Alembert's principle Energykinetic potentialForce Frame of reference Inertial frame of reference Impulse Inertia / Moment of inertia MassMechanical power Mechanical workMoment Momentum Space Speed Time Torque Velocity Virtual workFormulationsNewton's laws of motionAnalytical mechanicsLagrangian mechanics Hamiltonian mechanics Routhian mechanics Hamilton–Jacobi equation Appell's equation of m
[...More...]

"Potential Energy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vector (physics)
In mathematics, physics, and engineering, a Euclidean vector (sometimes called a geometric[1] or spatial vector,[2] or—as here—simply a vector) is a geometric object that has magnitude (or length) and direction. Vectors can be added to other vectors according to vector algebra. A Euclidean vector is frequently represented by a line segment with a definite direction, or graphically as an arrow, connecting an initial point A with a terminal point B,[3] and denoted by A B → . displaystyle overrightarrow AB
[...More...]

"Vector (physics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Slug (mass)
The slug is a derived unit of mass in the weight-based system of measures, most notably within the British Imperial measurement system and in the United States customary measures system
[...More...]

"Slug (mass)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dimensional Analysis
In engineering and science, dimensional analysis is the analysis of the relationships between different physical quantities by identifying their base quantities (such as length, mass, time, and electric charge) and units of measure (such as miles vs. kilometers, or pounds vs. kilograms vs. grams) and tracking these dimensions as calculations or comparisons are performed. Converting from one dimensional unit to another is often somewhat complex
[...More...]

"Dimensional Analysis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conservation Of Mass
The law of conservation of mass or principle of mass conservation states that for any system closed to all transfers of matter and energy, the mass of the system must remain constant over time, as system's mass cannot change, so quantity cannot be added nor removed. Hence, the quantity of mass is conserved over time. The law implies that mass can neither be created nor destroyed, although it may be rearranged in space, or the entities associated with it may be changed in form. For example, in chemical reactions, the mass of the chemical components before the reaction is equal to the mass of the components after the reaction. Thus, during any chemical reaction and low-energy thermodynamic processes in an isolated system, the total mass of the reactants, or starting materials, must be equal to the mass of the products. The concept of mass conservation is widely used in many fields such as chemistry, mechanics, and fluid dynamics
[...More...]

"Conservation Of Mass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Revolver
A revolver (also called a wheel gun[1][2]) is a repeating handgun that has a revolving cylinder containing multiple chambers and at least one barrel for firing. Revolvers might be regarded as a type of pistol, or as a subset of handguns, distinct from pistols, which in this case are defined as handguns with a single chamber. The revolver allows the user to fire multiple rounds without reloading after every shot, unlike older single shot firearms. After a round is fired the hammer is cocked and the next chamber in the cylinder is aligned with the barrel by the shooter either manually pulling the hammer back (single action operation) or by rearward movement of the trigger (double action operation). Revolvers still remain popular as back-up and off-duty handguns among American law enforcement
American law enforcement
officers and security guards and are still common in the American private sector as defensive and sporting/hunting firearms
[...More...]

"Revolver" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.