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Ray Stannard Baker
Ray Stannard Baker
Ray Stannard Baker
(April 17, 1870 in Lansing, Michigan
Lansing, Michigan
– July 12, 1946 in Amherst, Massachusetts)[1][2] (also known by his pen name David Grayson) was an American journalist, historian, biographer, and author.Contents1 Biography 2 Footnotes 3 Works 4 Further reading 5 External linksBiography[edit] Baker was born in Michigan. After graduating from the State Agricultural College (now Michigan State University), he attended law school at the University of Michigan
University of Michigan
in 1891 before launching his career as a journalist in 1892 with the Chicago News-Record, where he covered the Pullman Strike
Pullman Strike
and Coxey's Army
Coxey's Army
in 1894. In 1896, Ray Stannard Baker
Ray Stannard Baker
married Jessie Beal
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William James Beal
William James Beal
William James Beal
(March 11, 1833 – May 12, 1924) was an American botanist. He was a pioneer in the development of hybrid corn and the founder of the W. J. Beal Botanical Garden.Contents1 Biography 2 Education 3 Research at the Michigan
Michigan
Agricultural College 4 Germination Experiment 5 Published Works 6 Quotation 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksBiography[edit] Beal was born in Adrian, Michigan, to William and Rachel (Comstock) Beal,[1] His parents were pioneering Quaker settlers/farmers from New York state. Beal grew up in forested land surrounded by native plant and animal life.[2] He married Hannah Proud in 1863. He retired to Amherst, Massachusetts, and died there in 1924.[3] Education[edit] He attended the University of Michigan, where he earned an A.B. degree in 1859 and an A.M. degree in 1862; he also received an S.B. degree from Harvard University, 1865, an M.S
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Woodrow Wilson
President of the United StatesPresidencyFirst Term1912 campaignElection1st InaugurationWomen's suffrage Suffrage
Suffrage
paradeThe New Freedom Silent Sentinels Federal Reserve Act Clayton Antitrust
A

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Find A Grave
Find A Grave is a website that allows the public to search and add to an online database of cemetery records. It is owned by Ancestry.com. It receives and uploads digital photographs of headstones from burial sites, taken by unpaid volunteers at cemeteries
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Internet Archive
Coordinates: 37°46′56″N 122°28′18″W / 37.7823°N 122.4716°W / 37.7823; -122.4716Internet ArchiveType of business 501(c)(3) nonprofitType of siteDigital libraryAvailable in EnglishFounded May 12, 1996; 21 years ago (1996-05-12)[1][2]Headquarters Richmond District San Francisco, California, U.S.Chairman Brewster KahleServices Archive-It, Open Library, Wayback Machine
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LibriVox
LibriVox
LibriVox
is a group of worldwide volunteers who read and record public domain texts creating free public domain audiobooks for download from their website and other digital library hosting sites on the internet. It was founded in 2005 by Hugh McGuire to provide "Acoustical liberation of books in the public domain"[1] and the LibriVox objective is "To make all books in the public domain available, for free, in audio format on the internet".[2] By the end of 2017, LibriVox
LibriVox
had a catalog of over 12,000 works and from 2009–2017 was producing about 1,000 per year.[3] Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available. There are multiple affiliated projects that are providing additional content
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Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
(PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize and archive cultural works, to "encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks".[2] It was founded in 1971 by Michael S. Hart
Michael S. Hart
and is the oldest digital library.[3] Most of the items in its collection are the full texts of public domain books. The project tries to make these as free as possible, in long-lasting, open formats that can be used on almost any computer. As of 23 March 2018[update], Project Gutenberg reached 56,750 items in its collection of free eBooks.[4] The releases are available in plain text but, wherever possible, other formats are included, such as HTML, PDF, EPUB, MOBI, and Plucker. Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available. There are multiple affiliated projects that are providing additional content, including regional and language-specific works
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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Amherst, Massachusetts
Amherst (/ˈæmərst/ ( listen))[4] is a town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, United States, in the Connecticut River
Connecticut River
valley. As of the 2010 census, the population was 37,819,[5] making it the highest populated municipality in Hampshire County (although the county seat is Northampton). The town is home to Amherst College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Amherst, three of the Five Colleges. The name of the town is pronounced without the h ("AM-erst"),[6] giving rise to the local saying, "only the 'h' is silent", in reference both to the pronunciation and to the town's politically active populace.[7] Amherst has three census-designated places; Amherst Center, North Amherst, and South Amherst. Amherst is part of the Springfield, Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Metropolitan Statistical Area
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University Of Massachusetts
The University of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
is the five-campus public university system and the only public research system[4] in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The University system includes five campuses (Amherst, Boston, Dartmouth, Lowell, and a medical school in Worcester), and a satellite campus,[5][6] with system administration in Boston
Boston
and Shrewsbury.[7] The system is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges and across its campuses enrolls 73,000 students.[8] The UMass system is ranked 52nd in the World in 2016 for its Innovative Achievements according to Reuters.[9][10] Times Higher Education World University Rankings ranked the system 91-100 in the world by reputation in 2015[11] and 19th in the world in 2011.[12] Round University Ranking ranks University of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
No. 65 nationally and No
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Hugh Potter Baker
Hugh Potter Baker (January 20, 1878 – May 24, 1950)[1] was a graduate of the Michigan State College of Agriculture; Yale's School of Forestry (M.F., 1904); and the University of Munich (Ph.D., Economics, 1910). He was the second and fourth Dean of the New York State College of Forestry at Syracuse University, from 1912 to 1920 and 1930 to 1933. Baker previously had worked with Gifford Pinchot at the United States Bureau of Forestry and Forest Service (1901–04)
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University Of Massachusetts Amherst
The University of Massachusetts
University of Massachusetts
Amherst (abbreviated UMass Amherst and colloquially referred to as UMass or Massachusetts) is a public research and land-grant university in Amherst, Massachusetts, United States, and the flagship campus of the University of Massachusetts system. With approximately 1,300 faculty members and more than 29,000 students, UMass Amherst is the largest public university in New England[10] and is tied for 27th best public university in the nation.[11] The university offers bachelor's degrees, master's degrees, and doctoral degrees in 111 undergraduate, 75 master's and 47 doctoral programs in nine schools and colleges.[5] The main campus is situated north of downtown Amherst. In a 2009 article for MSN.com, Amherst was ranked first in Best College Towns in the United States.[12] In 2012, U.S. News and World Report
U.S

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Marquis James
A marquess (UK: /ˈmɑːrkwɪs/;[1] French: marquis, [mɑʁki];[2] Italian: marchese, Spanish: marqués, Portuguese: marquês) is a nobleman of hereditary rank in various European peerages and in those of some of their former colonies. The term is also used to translate equivalent Asian styles, as in imperial China and Japan. In the German lands, a Margrave
Margrave
was a ruler of an immediate Imperial territory (examples include the Margrave
Margrave
of Brandenburg, the Margrave of Baden and the Margrave
Margrave
of Bayreuth), not simply a nobleman like a marquess or marquis in Western and Southern Europe
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Treaty Of Versailles
The Treaty of Versailles
Versailles
(French: Traité de Versailles) was the most important of the peace treaties that brought World War I
World War I
to an end. The Treaty ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 June 1919 in Versailles, exactly five years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand which directly lead to World War I. The other Central Powers
Central Powers
on the German side of World War I
World War I
signed separate treaties.[8] Although the armistice, signed on 11 November 1918, ended the actual fighting, it took six months of Allied negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference to conclude the peace treaty
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Atlanta Race Riot
The Atlanta
Atlanta
race riot of 1906 was an attack of armed white mobs against blacks in Atlanta, Georgia
Atlanta, Georgia
(United States), which began the evening of September 22 and lasted through September 24, 1906. The events were covered internationally, including by the French Le Petit Journal and other newspapers, and was described as a "racial massacre of negroes".[1] The final death toll of the conflict is to this day unknown and disputed, but "officially" at least 25 African Americans,[2] and two confirmed European Americans
European Americans
died.[3] Unofficial reports ranged from 10 -100 African Americans and 2 European Americans killed during the riots. According to the Atlanta
Atlanta
History Center, some African Americans were hanged from lamposts; others were shot, beaten or stabbed to death
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