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Ray Carney
Raymond "Ray" Carney (born February 28, 1947), is an American scholar and critic, primarily known for his work as a film theorist, although he writes extensively on American art and literature as well. He is known for his study of the works of actor and director John Cassavetes. He teaches in the American Studies department at Boston University and has published several books on American art and film.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Viewpoints 3 Rappaport lawsuit 4 Selected bibliography 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] Carney was educated at Harvard (magna cum laude) and Rutgers. Professor Carney taught literature at Middlebury College
Middlebury College
and Humanities
Humanities
at the University of Texas at Austin
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Film Theory
Film
Film
theory is a set of scholarly approaches [1] within the academic discipline of cinema studies that questions the essentialism of cinema and provides conceptual frameworks for understanding film's relationship to reality, the other arts, individual viewers, and society at large. Film
Film
theory is not to be confused with general film criticism, or film history, though these three disciplines interrelate. Although film theory originated from linguistics and literary theory [2] it also overlaps with the philosophy of film.[3]Contents1 History 2 Specific theories of film 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit] French philosopher Henri Bergson's Matter and Memory (1896) has been cited as anticipating the development of film theory during the birth of cinema. Bergson commented on the need for new ways of thinking about movement, and coined the terms "the movement-image" and "the time-image"
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Online Petition
An online petition (or Internet petition, or e-petition) is a form of petition which is signed online, usually through a form on a website. Visitors to the online petition sign the petition by adding their details such as name and email address. Typically, after there are enough signatories, the resulting letter may be delivered to the subject of the petition, usually via e-mail
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David Lynch
David Keith Lynch (born January 20, 1946) is an American filmmaker, painter, musician, actor, and photographer. He has been described by The Guardian
The Guardian
as "the most important director of this era,"[1] while AllMovie
AllMovie
called him "the Renaissance man of modern American filmmaking."[2] He has received three Academy Award nominations[3] for Best Director, and has won France's César Award for Best Foreign Film twice, as well as the Palme d'Or
Palme d'Or
at the Cannes
Cannes
Film Festival[4] and a Golden Lion
Golden Lion
award for lifetime achievement at the Venice Film Festival
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Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Jerome Tarantino[1] (/ˌtærənˈtiːnoʊ/; born March 27, 1963) is an American director, writer, and actor. His films are characterized by nonlinear storylines, satirical subject matter, an aestheticization of violence, extended scenes of dialogue, ensemble casts consisting of established and lesser-known performers, references to popular culture, soundtracks primarily containing songs and score pieces from the 1960s to the 1980s, and features of neo-noir film. He is widely considered one of the greatest filmmakers of his generation. His career began in the late 1980s, when he wrote and directed My Best Friend's Birthday, the screenplay of which formed the basis for True Romance
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Schindler's List
Schindler's List
Schindler's List
is a 1993 American historical period drama film directed and co-produced by Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
and written by Steven Zaillian. It is based on the novel Schindler's Ark
Schindler's Ark
by Australian novelist Thomas Keneally. The film follows Oskar Schindler, a Sudeten German businessman, who saved the lives of more than a thousand mostly Polish-Jewish refugees from the Holocaust by employing them in his factories during World War II. It stars Liam Neeson
Liam Neeson
as Schindler, Ralph Fiennes
Ralph Fiennes
as SS officer Amon Göth, and Ben Kingsley
Ben Kingsley
as Schindler's Jewish accountant Itzhak Stern. Ideas for a film about the Schindlerjuden
Schindlerjuden
(Schindler Jews) were proposed as early as 1963
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Alaska Quarterly Review
The Alaska Quarterly Review is a biannual literary journal founded in 1980[1] by Ronald Spatz and James Liszka at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Ronald Spatz serves as editor-in-chief. It was deemed by the Washington Post "Book World" to be "one of the nation's best literary magazines". A number of works originally published in The Alaska Quarterly Review have been subsequently selected for inclusion in The Best American Essays, The Best American Poetry, The Best American Mystery Stories, The Best Creative Nonfiction, The Best American Short Stories, The Best American Nonrequired Reading, Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards, The Beacon Best, and The Pushcart Prize: The Best of the Small Presses.[2] Notable writers who have contributed to this journal include Pulitzer Prize winner Jane Smiley, Pushcart Prize winner Ira Sadoff and PEN/Hemingway Award recipient Jennifer Haigh
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Woody Allen
Heywood Allen (born Allan Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is an American director, writer, actor, comedian, and musician whose career spans more than six decades. He began his career as a comedy writer in the 1950s, writing jokes and scripts for television and publishing several books of short humor pieces. In the early 1960s, Allen began performing as a stand-up comedian, emphasizing monologues rather than traditional jokes
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Symbol
A symbol is a mark, sign, or word that indicates, signifies, or is understood as representing an idea, object, or relationship. Symbols allow people to go beyond what is known or seen by creating linkages between otherwise very different concepts and experiences. All communication (and data processing) is achieved through the use of symbols. Symbols take the form of words, sounds, gestures, ideas or visual images and are used to convey other ideas and beliefs. For example, a red octagon may be a symbol for "STOP". On a map, a blue line might represent a river. Numerals are symbols for numbers. Alphabetic letters may be symbols for sounds. Personal names are symbols representing individuals. A red rose may symbolize love and compassion
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Esoteric
Western esotericism
Western esotericism
(also called esotericism or esoterism), also known as the Western mystery tradition,[1] is a term under which scholars have categorised a wide range of loosely related ideas and movements which have developed within Western society. These ideas and currents are united by the fact that they are largely distinct both from orthodox Judeo-Christian religion and from Enlightenment rationalism. Esotericism has pervaded various forms of Western philosophy, religion, pseudoscience, art, literature, and music, continuing to affect intellectual ideas and popular culture. The idea of categorising a wide range of Western traditions and philosophies together under the rubric that we now term "esotericism" developed in Europe during the late seventeenth century. Various academics have debated the precise definition of Western esotericism, with a number of different options proposed
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Cyber Bullying
Cyberbullying
Cyberbullying
or cyberharassment is a form of bullying or harassment using electronic means. Cyberbullying
Cyberbullying
and Cyberharassment are also known as online bullying. It has become increasingly common, especially among teenagers.[1] Cyberbullying
Cyberbullying
is when someone, typically teens, bully or harass others on social media sites. Cyberbullying
Cyberbullying
allows bullies to easily and anonymously harass victims online. They do this by flaming, harassing, outing, exclusion, impersonation, and stalking[2]
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Cambridge University Press
Cambridge
Cambridge
University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge. Granted letters patent by King Henry VIII in 1534, it is the world's oldest publishing house and the second-largest university press in the world (after Oxford University Press).[2][3] It also holds letters patent as the Queen's Printer.[4] The press's mission is "To further the University's mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence."[5] Cambridge
Cambridge
University Press is a department of the University of Cambridge
Cambridge
and is both an academic and educational publisher. With a global sales presence, publishing hubs, and offices in more than 40 countries, it publishes over 50,000 titles by authors from over 100 countries
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Stanley Kubrick
Stanley Kubrick
Stanley Kubrick
(/ˈkuːbrɪk/; July 26, 1928 – March 7, 1999) was an American film director, screenwriter, and producer. He is frequently cited as one of the greatest and most influential directors in cinematic history. His films, which are mostly adaptations of novels or short stories, cover a wide range of genres, and are noted for their realism, dark humor, unique cinematography, extensive set designs, and evocative use of music. Kubrick was raised in the Bronx, New York City, and attended William Howard Taft High School from 1941 to 1945
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British Film Institute
The British Film
Film
Institute (BFI) is a film and charitable organisation which promotes and preserves filmmaking and television in the United Kingdom. It was established by Royal Charter
Roya

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Faber And Faber
Faber and Faber Limited, often abbreviated to Faber, is an independent publishing house in the United Kingdom. Faber has published some of the most well-known literature in the English language, including William Golding's Lord of the Flies. Poet T. S. Eliot
T. S. Eliot
was once a Faber editor. In 2006 the company was named the KPMG
KPMG
Publisher of the Year.[1] Faber and Faber Inc., formerly the American branch of the London company, was sold in 1998 to the Holtzbrinck company Farrar, Straus and Giroux
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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