HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Random Access Memory
Random-access memory
Random-access memory
(RAM /ræm/) is a form of computer data storage that stores data and machine code currently being used. A random-access memory device allows data items to be read or written in almost the same amount of time irrespective of the physical location of data inside the memory. In contrast, with other direct-access data storage media such as hard disks, CD-RWs, DVD-RWs and the older magnetic tapes and drum memory, the time required to read and write data items varies significantly depending on their physical locations on the recording medium, due to mechanical limitations such as media rotation speeds and arm movement. RAM contains multiplexing and demultiplexing circuitry, to connect the data lines to the addressed storage for reading or writing the entry. Usually more than one bit of storage is accessed by the same address, and RAM devices often have multiple data lines and are said to be "8-bit" or "16-bit", etc
[...More...]

"Random Access Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Random Access Memories
Random Access Memories
Random Access Memories
is the fourth studio album by French electronic music duo Daft Punk. It was released on 17 May 2013, by the duo's imprint Daft Life and Columbia Records. The album pays tribute to the late 1970s and early 1980s American music, particularly from Los Angeles. This theme is reflected in the album's packaging, as well as its promotional campaign, which included billboards, television advertisements and a web series. Unlike their previous albums, Daft Punk
Daft Punk
recruited session musicians to perform live instrumentation and limited the use of electronic instruments to drum machines, a custom-built modular synthesizer, and vintage vocoders. The album features collaborations with Giorgio Moroder, Panda Bear, Julian Casablancas, Todd Edwards, DJ Falcon, Chilly Gonzales, Nile Rodgers, Paul Williams and Pharrell Williams
[...More...]

"Random Access Memories" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Plated Wire Memory
Plated wire memory is a variation of core memory developed by Bell Laboratories in 1957. Its primary advantage was that it could be machine-assembled, which potentially led to lower prices than the hand-assembled core. Instead of threading individual ferrite cores on wires, plated wire memory used a grid of wires coated with a thin layer of iron-nickel alloy (called permalloy). The magnetic field normally stored in the ferrite core was instead stored on the wire itself. Operation was generally similar to core, but could also be built with a non-destructive read that did not require refreshing. Plated wire memory has been used in a number of applications, typically in aerospace
[...More...]

"Plated Wire Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hard Disk Drive
A hard disk drive (HDD), hard disk, hard drive or fixed disk[b] is a data storage device that uses magnetic storage to store and retrieve digital information using one or more rigid rapidly rotating disks (platters) coated with magnetic material. The platters are paired with magnetic heads, usually arranged on a moving actuator arm, which read and write data to the platter surfaces.[2] Data is accessed in a random-access manner, meaning that individual blocks of data can be stored or retrieved in any order and not only sequentially. HDDs are a type of non-volatile storage, retaining stored data even when powered off.[3][4][5] Introduced by IBM
IBM
in 1956,[6] HDDs became the dominant secondary storage device for general-purpose computers by the early 1960s. Continuously improved, HDDs have maintained this position into the modern era of servers and personal computers
[...More...]

"Hard Disk Drive" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Optical Disc
In computing and optical disc recording technologies, an optical disc (OD) is a flat, usually circular disc which encodes binary data (bits) in the form of pits (binary value of 0 or off, due to lack of reflection when read) and lands (binary value of 1 or on, due to a reflection when read) on a special material (often aluminium[1] ) on one of its flat surfaces. The encoding material sits atop a thicker substrate (usually polycarbonate) which makes up the bulk of the disc and forms a dust defocusing layer. The encoding pattern follows a continuous, spiral path covering the entire disc surface and extending from the innermost track to the outermost track
[...More...]

"Optical Disc" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Racetrack Memory
Racetrack memory
Racetrack memory
or domain-wall memory (DWM) is an experimental non-volatile memory device under development at IBM's Almaden Research Center by a team led by physicist Stuart Parkin.[1] In early 2008, a 3-bit version was successfully demonstrated.[2] If it were to be developed successfully, racetrack would offer storage density higher than comparable solid-state memory devices like flash memory and similar to conventional disk drives, with higher read/write performance.[3]Contents1 Description 2 Comparison to other memory devices 3 Development challenges 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] Racetrack memory
Racetrack memory
uses a spin-coherent electric current to move magnetic domains along a nanoscopic permalloy wire about 200 nm across and 100 nm thick
[...More...]

"Racetrack Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Millipede Memory
Millipede
Millipede
memory is a non-volatile computer memory stored on nanoscopic pits burned into the surface of a thin polymer layer, read and written by a MEMS-based probe.[4][5] It promised a data density of more than 1 terabit per square inch (1 gigabit per square millimeter), which is about the limit of the perpendicular recording hard drives. Millipede
Millipede
storage technology was pursued as a potential replacement for magnetic recording in hard drives, at the same time reducing the form-factor to that of flash media. IBM demonstrated a prototype millipede storage device at CeBIT
CeBIT
2005, and was trying to make the technology commercially available by the end of 2007
[...More...]

"Millipede Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

FJG RAM
FJG RAM, short for Floating Junction Gate Random Access Memory, is a type of computer memory invented by Oriental Semiconductor Co., Ltd. The FJG RAM has an ultra-compact cell area of 4F2 (F refers to feature size) and a capacitorless cell configuration. It is made without exotic process steps, materials or new process tools, and the process for making the device is available from all existing DRAM
DRAM
fabs. Due to the absence of a capacitor, the FJG cell process is more compatible with logic process, allowing its use not only in standalone DRAM applications but also in embedded- DRAM
DRAM
applications
[...More...]

"FJG RAM" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Paper Data Storage
Paper
Paper
data storage refers to the use of paper as a data storage device. This includes writing, illustrating, and the use of data that can be interpreted by a machine or is the result of the functioning of a machine. A defining feature of paper data storage is the ability of humans to produce it with only simple tools and interpret it visually. Though this is now mostly obsolete, paper was once also an important form of computer data storage.Contents1 History 2 Limits 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Before paper was used for storing data, it had been used in several applications for storing instructions to specify a machine's operation. The earliest use of paper to store instructions for a machine was the work of Basile Bouchon
Basile Bouchon
who, in 1725, used punched paper rolls to control textile looms. This technology was later developed into the wildly successful Jacquard loom
[...More...]

"Paper Data Storage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Drum Memory
Drum memory
Drum memory
was a magnetic data storage device invented by Gustav Tauschek in 1932 in Austria.[1][2] Drums were widely used in the 1950s and into the 1960s as computer memory. For many early computers, drum memory formed the main working memory of the computer. It was so common that these computers were often referred to as drum machines.[3] Some drum memories were also used as secondary storage.[4] Drums were displaced as primary computer memory by magnetic core memory which was a better balance of size, speed, cost, reliability and potential for further improvements.[5] Similarly, drums were replaced by hard disk drives for secondary storage, which were also less expensive and denser. The manufacture of drums ceased in the 1970s.Contents1 Design 2 Use and legacy 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksDesign[edit] A drum memory contained a large metal cylinder, coated on the outside surface with a ferromagnetic recording material
[...More...]

"Drum Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Magnetic-core Memory
Magnetic-core memory
Magnetic-core memory
was the predominant form of random-access computer memory for 20 years between about 1955 and 1975. Such memory is often just called core memory, or, informally, core. Core uses tiny magnetic toroids (rings), the cores, through which wires are threaded to write and read information. Each core represents one bit of information. The cores can be magnetized in two different ways (clockwise or counterclockwise) and the bit stored in a core is zero or one depending on that core's magnetization direction. The wires are arranged to allow for an individual core to be set to either a one or a zero and for its magnetization to be changed by sending appropriate electric current pulses through selected wires. The process of reading the core causes the core to be reset to a zero, thus erasing it. This is called destructive readout
[...More...]

"Magnetic-core Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Thin-film Memory
Thin-film memory is a high-speed variation of core memory developed by Sperry Rand in a government-funded research project. Instead of threading individual ferrite cores on wires, thin-film memory consisted of 4 micrometre thick dots of permalloy, an iron-nickel alloy, deposited on small glass plates by vacuum evaporation techniques and a mask. The drive and sense lines were then added using printed circuit wiring over the alloy dots. This provided very fast access times in the range of 670 nanoseconds, but was very expensive to produce. In 1962, the UNIVAC 1107, intended for the civilian marketplace, used thin-film memory only for its 128-word general register stack. Military computers, where cost was less of a concern, used larger amounts of thin-film memory
[...More...]

"Thin-film Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Phase-change Memory
Phase-change memory
Phase-change memory
(also known as PCM, PCME, PRAM, PCRAM, OUM (ovonic unified memory) and C-RAM or CRAM (chalcogenide RAM)) is a type of non-volatile random-access memory. PRAMs exploit the unique behaviour of chalcogenide glass. In the older generation of PCM, heat produced by the passage of an electric current through a heating element generally made of TiN was used to either quickly heat and quench the glass, making it amorphous, or to hold it in its crystallization temperature range for some time, thereby switching it to a crystalline state
[...More...]

"Phase-change Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Disk Pack
Disk packs and disk cartridges were early forms of removable media for computer data storage, introduced in the 1960s.Contents1 Disk pack 2 Disk cartridge 3 Alignment 4 References 5 See alsoDisk pack[edit] Disk pack
Disk pack
manufactured by Nashua, USA, without its protective cover. A 3.5" modern hard drive is shown for comparison.A Disk pack
Disk pack
is a layered grouping of hard disk platters (circular, rigid discs coated with a magnetic data storage surface). A disk pack is the core component of a hard disk drive. In modern hard disks, the disk pack is permanently sealed inside the drive. In many early hard disks, the disk pack was a removable unit, and would be supplied with a protective canister featuring a lifting handle. The protective cover consisted of two parts, a clear plastic shell, with a handle in the center, that enclosed the top and sides of the disks and a separate bottom that completed the sealed package
[...More...]

"Disk Pack" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Twistor Memory
Twistor is a form of computer memory formed by wrapping magnetic tape around a current-carrying wire. Operationally, twistor was very similar to core memory. Twistor could also be used to make ROM memories, including a re-programmable form known as piggyback twistor. Both forms were able to be manufactured using automated processes, which was expected to lead to much lower production costs than core-based systems. Introduced by Bell Labs
Bell Labs
in 1957, the first commercial use was in their 1ESS switch
1ESS switch
which went into operation in 1965. Twistor was used only briefly in the late 1960s and early 1970s, when semiconductor memory devices replaced almost all earlier memory systems
[...More...]

"Twistor Memory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Floppy Disk
A floppy disk, also called a floppy, diskette, or just disk, is a type of disk storage composed of a disk of thin and flexible magnetic storage medium, sealed in a rectangular plastic enclosure lined with fabric that removes dust particles
[...More...]

"Floppy Disk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.