HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Rainbow Trout
The rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus
Oncorhynchus
mykiss) is a trout and species of salmonid native to cold-water tributaries of the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
in Asia and North America. The steelhead (sometimes called "steelhead trout") is an anadromous (sea-run) form of the coastal rainbow trout (O. m. irideus) or Columbia River redband trout
Columbia River redband trout
(O. m. gairdneri) that usually returns to fresh water to spawn after living two to three years in the ocean. Freshwater forms that have been introduced into the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and migrate into tributaries to spawn are also called steelhead. Adult freshwater stream rainbow trout average between 1 and 5 lb (0.5 and 2.3 kg), while lake-dwelling and anadromous forms may reach 20 lb (9 kg). Coloration varies widely based on subspecies, forms and habitat
[...More...]

"Rainbow Trout" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

California Academy Of Sciences
The California
California
Academy of Sciences is a research institute and natural history museum in San Francisco, California, that is among the largest museums of natural history in the world, housing over 26 million specimens.[2] The Academy began in 1853 as a learned society and still carries out a large amount of original research, with exhibits and education becoming significant endeavors of the museum during the 20th century.[3] Completely rebuilt in 2008, the building covers 400,000 square feet (37,000 square metres) and is among the newest natural history museums in the United States.[2] The primary building in Golden Gate Park
[...More...]

"California Academy Of Sciences" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Threatened Species
Threatened species
Threatened species
are any species (including animals, plants, fungi, etc.) which are vulnerable to endangerment in the near future. Species that are threatened are sometimes characterised by the population dynamics measure of critical depensation, a mathematical measure of biomass related to population growth rate
[...More...]

"Threatened Species" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Habitat
In ecology, a habitat is the kind of natural environment in which a particular organism species lives. It is characterized by both physical and biological features. A species' habitat is those places where it can find food, shelter, protection and mates for reproduction. The physical factors are for example soil, moisture, range of temperature, and light intensity as well as biotic factors such as the availability of food and the presence or absence of predators. Every organism has certain habitat needs for the conditions in which it will thrive, but some are tolerant of wide variations while others are very specific in their requirements
[...More...]

"Habitat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
[...More...]

"Taxonomy (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gill
A gill (/ɡɪl/ ( listen)) is a respiratory organ found in many aquatic organisms that extracts dissolved oxygen from water and excretes carbon dioxide. The gills of some species, such as hermit crabs, have adapted to allow respiration on land provided they are kept moist. The microscopic structure of a gill presents a large surface area to the external environment. Branchia (pl. branchiae) is the zoologists' name for gills. With the exception of some aquatic insects, the filaments and lamellae (folds) contain blood or coelomic fluid, from which gases are exchanged through the thin walls. The blood carries oxygen to other parts of the body. Carbon dioxide
Carbon dioxide
passes from the blood through the thin gill tissue into the water. Gills or gill-like organs, located in different parts of the body, are found in various groups of aquatic animals, including mollusks, crustaceans, insects, fish, and amphibians
[...More...]

"Gill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fish Hatchery
A fish hatchery is a place for artificial breeding, hatching, and rearing through the early life stages of animals—finfish and shellfish in particular.[1] Hatcheries produce larval and juvenile fish, shellfish, and crustaceans, primarily to support the aquaculture industry where they are transferred to on-growing systems, such as fish farms, to reach harvest size. Some species that are commonly raised in hatcheries include Pacific oysters, shrimp, Indian prawns, salmon, tilapia and scallops
[...More...]

"Fish Hatchery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Southern Europe
Southern Europe
Europe
is the southern region of the European continent. Most definitions of Southern Europe, also known as Mediterranean Europe, includes Southern and Eastern Spain, Southern France, Italy, the Adriatic coast of former Yugoslavia, Albania, Greece
Greece
and East Thrace of European Turkey. Serbia[1][2] and Portugal
Portugal
are also usually included despite not having a coast in the Mediterranean.[3]Geographic features of Southern European countries surrounding the Mediterranean SeaEuropean subregions according to Eurovoc
Eurovoc
(the thesaurus of the European Union). Southern Europe
Europe
is marked yellow on this map.Different methods can be used to define Southern Europe, including its political, economic, and cultural attributes
[...More...]

"Southern Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hybrid (biology)
In biology, a hybrid, or crossbreed, is the result of combining the qualities of two organisms of different breeds, varieties, species or genera through sexual reproduction. Hybrids are not always intermediates between their parents (such as in blending inheritance), but can show hybrid vigour, often growing larger or taller than either parent. The concept of a hybrid is interpreted differently in animal and plant breeding, where there is interest in the individual parentage. In genetics, attention is focused on the numbers of chromosomes. In taxonomy, a key question is how closely related the parent species are. Species
Species
are reproductively isolated by strong barriers to hybridisation, which include morphological differences, differing times of fertility, mating behaviors and cues, and physiological rejection of sperm cells or the developing embryo. Some act before fertilization and others after it
[...More...]

"Hybrid (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wyoming
Wyoming
Wyoming
/waɪˈoʊmɪŋ/ ( listen) is a state in the mountain region of the western United States. The state is the 10th largest by area, the least populous and the second least densely populated state in the country. Wyoming
Wyoming
is bordered on the north by Montana, on the east by South Dakota
South Dakota
and Nebraska, on the south by Colorado, on the southwest by Utah, and on the west by Idaho. The state population was estimated at 586,107 in 2015, which is less than 31 of the most populous U.S. cities including neighboring Denver.[8] Cheyenne is the state capital and the most populous city, with population estimated at 63,335 in 2015.[9] The western two-thirds of the state is covered mostly by the mountain ranges and rangelands of the Rocky Mountains, while the eastern third of the state is high elevation prairie called the High Plains
[...More...]

"Wyoming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Distinct Population Segment
A distinct population segment is the smallest division of a taxonomic species permitted to be protected under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Species, as defined in the Act for listing purposes, is a taxonomic species or subspecies of plant or animal, or in the case of vertebrate species, a distinct population segment (DPS).Contents1 Criteria for designation1.1 Discreteness 1.2 Significance 1.3 Status2 Priorities 3 Relationship to Evolutionarily Significant Units (ESU's) 4 References 5 External linksCriteria for designation[edit] The criteria for designation of a population or group of populations as a DPS was most recently articulated in a 1996 joint USFWS-NMFS policy (61 FR 4722: February 7, 1996): Three elements are considered in a decision regarding the status of a possible DPS as endangered or threatened under the Act. These are applied similarly for addition to the lists of endangered and threatened wildlife and plants, reclassification, and removal from the lists: 1
[...More...]

"Distinct Population Segment" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Endangered Species
An endangered species is a species which has been categorized as very likely to become extinct. Endangered (EN), as categorized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN) Red List, is the second most severe conservation status for wild populations in the IUCN's schema after Critically Endangered (CR). In 2012, the IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
featured 3079 animal and 2655 plant species as endangered (EN) worldwide.[1] The figures for 1998 were, respectively, 1102 and 1197. Many nations have laws that protect conservation-reliant species: for example, forbidding hunting, restricting land development or creating preserves
[...More...]

"Endangered Species" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Great Lakes
The Great Lakes
Great Lakes
(French: les Grands-Lacs), also called the Laurentian Great Lakes[1] and the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
of North America, are a series of interconnected freshwater lakes located primarily in the upper mid-east region of North America, on the Canada–United States border, which connect to the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
through the Saint Lawrence River
[...More...]

"Great Lakes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Endangered Species Act
The Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA; 16 U.S.C. § 1531 et seq.) is one of the few dozens of US environmental laws passed in the 1970s, and serves as the enacting legislation to carry out the provisions outlined in The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).[1] Designed to protect critically imperiled species from extinction as a "consequence of economic growth and development untempered by adequate concern and conservation", the ESA was signed into law by President Richard Nixon on December 28, 1973. The U.S
[...More...]

"Endangered Species Act" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Natural History
Natural history
Natural history
is the research and study of organisms including animals, fungi and plants in their environment, leaning more towards observational than experimental methods of study. A person who studies natural history is known as a naturalist or natural historian. Natural history encompasses scientific research but is not limited to it, with articles nowadays more often published in science magazines than in academic journals.[1] Grouped among the natural sciences, natural history is the systematic study of any category of natural objects or organisms.[2] That is a very broad designation in a world filled with many narrowly focused disciplines
[...More...]

"Natural History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taxonomist
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
[...More...]

"Taxonomist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.