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Radius Bone
The radius or radial bone is one of the two large bones of the forearm, the other being the ulna. It extends from the lateral side of the elbow to the thumb side of the wrist and runs parallel to the ulna. The radius is shorter and smaller than the ulna. It is a long bone, prism-shaped and slightly curved longitudinally. The radius is part of two joints: the elbow and the wrist. At the elbow, it joins with the capitulum of the humerus, and in a separate region, with the ulna at the radial notch. At the wrist, the radius forms a joint with the ulna bone. The corresponding bone in the lower leg is the tibia.Contents1 Structure1.1 Near the wrist 1.2 Body 1.3 Near the elbow 1.4 Development2 Function2.1 Muscle attachments3 Clinical significance3.1 Fracture4 History 5 Other animals 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 ReferencesStructure[edit] The long narrow medullary cavity is enclosed in a strong wall of compact bone
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Forearm
The forearm is the region of the upper limb between the elbow and the wrist.[1] The term forearm is used in anatomy to distinguish it from the arm, a word which is most often used to describe the entire appendage of the upper limb, but which in anatomy, technically, means only the region of the upper arm, whereas the lower "arm" is called the forearm. It is homologous to the region of the leg that lies between the knee and the ankle joints, the crus. The forearm contains two long bones, the radius and the ulna, forming the radioulnar joint. The interosseous membrane connects these bones. Ultimately, the forearm is covered by skin, the anterior surface usually being less hairy than the posterior surface. The forearm contains many muscles, including the flexors and extensors of the digits, a flexor of the elbow (brachioradialis), and pronators and supinators that turn the hand to face down or upwards, respectively
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Volar Radiocarpal Ligament
The palmar radiocarpal ligament (anterior ligament, volar radiocarpal ligament) is a broad membranous band, attached above to the distal end of the radius, to the scaphoid, lunate and the triquetrum of the carpal bones in the wrist
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Scaphoid
The scaphoid bone is one of the carpal bones of the wrist. It is situated between the hand and forearm on the thumb side of the wrist (also called the lateral or radial side). It forms the radial border of the carpal tunnel. The scaphoid bone is the largest bone of the proximal row of wrist bones, its long axis being from above downward, lateralward, and forward. It is approximately the size and shape of a medium cashew.Contents1 Structure1.1 Bone 1.2 Blood supply 1.3 Variation 1.4 In animals2 Function 3 Clinical significance3.1 Fracture 3.2 Other diseases 3.3 Palpation4 Etymology 5 Additional images 6 ReferencesStructure[edit] The scaphoid is situated between the proximal and distal rows of carpal bones
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Lunate Bone
The lunate bone (semilunar bone) is a carpal bone in the human hand. It is distinguished by its deep concavity and crescentic outline. It is situated in the center of the proximal row carpal bones, which lie between the ulna and radius and the hand. The lunate carpal bone is situated between the lateral scaphoid bone and medial triquetral bone.Contents1 Structure1.1 Bone 1.2 Blood supply 1.3 Variation 1.4 Ossification2 Function 3 Clinical relevance 4 Etymology 5 Additional images 6 See also 7 ReferencesStructure[edit] The lunate is a crescent-shaped carpal bone found within the hand. The lunate is found within the proximal row of carpal bones. Proximally, it abuts the radius. Laterally, it articulates with the scaphoid, medially with the triquetral, and distally with the capitate. The lunate also articulates on its distal and medial surface with the hamate bone.[1]:708[2] The lunate is stabilised by a medial ligament to the scaphoid and a lateral ligament to the triquetrum
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Radial Styloid Process
The radial styloid process is a projection of bone on the lateral surface of the distal radius bone. It extends obliquely downward into a strong, conical projection. The tendon of the brachioradialis attaches at its base, and the radial collateral ligament of the wrist attaches at its apex
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Lister's Tubercle
Lister's tubercle or dorsal tubercle of radius is a bony prominence located at the distal end of the radius, palpable on the dorsum of the wrist. Function[edit] Lister's tubercle serves as a pulley for the tendon of extensor pollicis longus, which wraps around the medial side and takes a 45 degree turn.[1] References[edit]^ "Wheeless Online"
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Proximal Radioulnar Articulation
The proximal radioulnar articulation (superior radioulnar joint) is a synovial pivot joint between the circumference of the head of the radius and the ring formed by the radial notch of the ulna and the annular ligament. Nerve Supply[edit]median nerve musculocutaneous nerve radial nerveSee also[edit]Distal radioulnar articulation SupinationReferences[edit] This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 324 of the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy
Gray's Anatomy
(1918)v t eJoints and ligaments of the armShoul
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Distal Radioulnar Articulation
The distal radioulnar articulation (inferior radioulnar joint) is a joint between the two bones in the forearm; the radius and ulna. It is one of two joints between the radius and ulna, the other being the proximal radioulnar articulation
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Interosseous Membrane Of Forearm
The interosseous membrane of the forearm (rarely middle or intermediate radioulnar joint) is a fibrous sheet that connects the interosseous margins of the radius and the ulna. It is the main part of the radio-ulnar syndesmosis, a fibrous joint between the two bones.Contents1 Function 2 Injury 3 See also 4 ReferencesFunction[edit] The interosseus membrane divides the forearm into anterior and posterior compartments, serves as a site of attachment for muscles of the forearm, and transfers loads placed on the forearm. The interosseous membrane is designed to shift compressive loads (as in doing a hand-stand) from the distal radius to the proximal ulna. The fibers within the interosseous membrane are oriented obliquely so that when force is applied the fibers are drawn taut, shifting more of the load to the ulna
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Carpus
The carpal bones are the eight small bones that make up the wrist (or carpus) that connects the hand to the forearm. This term derives its meaning from the Latin
Latin
carpus and the Greek καρπός (karpós), both meaning "wrist." In human anatomy, the main role of the wrist is to facilitate effective positioning of the hand and powerful use of the extensors and flexors of the forearm, and the mobility of individual carpal bones increase the freedom of movements at the wrist.[1] In tetrapods, the carpus is the sole cluster of bones in the wrist between the radius and ulna and the metacarpus. The bones of the carpus do not belong to individual fingers (or toes in quadrupeds), whereas those of the metacarpus do. The corresponding part of the foot is the tarsus
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Scaphoid Bone
The scaphoid bone is one of the carpal bones of the wrist. It is situated between the hand and forearm on the thumb side of the wrist (also called the lateral or radial side). It forms the radial border of the carpal tunnel. The scaphoid bone is the largest bone of the proximal row of wrist bones, its long axis being from above downward, lateralward, and forward. It is approximately the size and shape of a medium cashew.Contents1 Structure1.1 Bone 1.2 Blood supply 1.3 Variation 1.4 In animals2 Function 3 Clinical significance3.1 Fracture 3.2 Other diseases 3.3 Palpation4 Etymology 5 Additional images 6 ReferencesStructure[edit] The scaphoid is situated between the proximal and distal rows of carpal bones
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Ulnar Notch
The articular surface for the ulna is called the ulnar notch (sigmoid cavity) of the radius; it is in the distal radius, and is narrow, concave, smooth, and articulates with the head of the ulna forming the distal radioulnar joint. References[edit] This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 220 of the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy
Gray's Anatomy
(1918)v t eBones of the armShoulder girdle, clavicleconoid tubercle trapezoid line costal tuberosity subclavian grooveScapulafossae (subscapular, supraspinatous, in
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Dorsal Radiocarpal Ligament
The dorsal radiocarpal ligament (posterior ligament) less thick and strong than the volar, is attached, above, to the posterior border of the lower end of the radius; its fibers are directed obliquely downward and medialward, and are fixed, below, to the dorsal surfaces of the navicular (now known as scaphoid), lunate, and triquetral, being continuous with those of the Dorsal intercarpal ligament. It is in relation, behind, with the Extensor tendons of the fingers; in front, it is blended with the articular disk. External links[edit]Hand kinesiology at the University of Kansas Medical CenterThis article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated
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Body Of Radius
The radius or radial bone is one of the two large bones of the forearm, the other being the ulna. It extends from the lateral side of the elbow to the thumb side of the wrist and runs parallel to the ulna. The radius is shorter and smaller than the ulna. It is a long bone, prism-shaped and slightly curved longitudinally. The radius is part of two joints: the elbow and the wrist. At the elbow, it joins with the capitulum of the humerus, and in a separate region, with the ulna at the radial notch. At the wrist, the radius forms a joint with the ulna bone. The corresponding bone in the lower leg is the tibia.Contents1 Structure1.1 Near the wrist 1.2 Body 1.3 Near the elbow 1.4 Development2 Function2.1 Muscle attachments3 Clinical significance3.1 Fracture4 History 5 Other animals 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 ReferencesStructure[edit] The long narrow medullary cavity is enclosed in a strong wall of compact bone
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Extensor Carpi Radialis Longus Muscle
The extensor carpi radialis longus is one of the five main muscles that control movements at the wrist
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