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Radian
The radian (SI symbol rad) is the SI unit for measuring angles, and is the standard unit of angular measure used in many areas of mathematics. The length of an arc of a unit circle is numerically equal to the measurement in radians of the angle that it subtends; one radian is just under 57.3 degrees (expansion at  A072097). The unit was formerly an SI supplementary unit, but this category was abolished in 1995 and the radian is now considered an SI derived unit.[1] Separately, the SI unit of solid angle measurement is the steradian. The radian is most commonly represented by the symbol rad.[2] An alternative symbol is c, the superscript letter c (for "circular measure"), the letter r, or a superscript R,[3] but these symbols are infrequently used as it can be easily mistaken for a degree symbol (°) or a radius (r)
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Al-Kashi
Ghiyāth al-Dīn Jamshīd Masʿūd al-Kāshī (or al-Kāshānī)[1] (Persian: غیاث الدین جمشید کاشانی‎ Ghiyās-ud-dīn Jamshīd Kāshānī) (c. 1380 Kashan, Iran – 22 June 1429 Samarkand, Transoxania) was a Persian astronomer and mathematician.[2][3] Much of al-Kāshī's work was not brought to Europe, and much, even the extant work, remains unpublished in any form.[4]Contents1 Biography 2 Astronomy2.1 Khaqani Zij 2.2 Astronomical Treatise on the size and distance of heavenly bodies 2.3 Treatise on Astronomical Observational Instruments2.3.1 Plate of Conjunctions 2.3.2 Planetary computer3 Mathematics3.1 Law of cosines 3.2 The Treatise of Chord and Sine 3.3 The Key to Arithmetic3.3.1 Computation of 2π 3.3.2 Decimal fractions 3.3.3 Khayyam's triangle4 Biographical film 5 Notes 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Al-Kashi was one of the best mathematicians in the history of Iran
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James Thomson (engineer)
Prof James Thomson FRS FRSE
FRSE
LLD (16 February 1822 – 8 May 1892) was an engineer and physicist whose reputation is substantial though it is overshadowed by that of his younger brother William Thomson (Lord Kelvin).Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Belfast, much of his youth was spent in Glasgow. His father James was professor of mathematics at the University of Glasgow
Glasgow
from 1832 onward and his younger brother William was to become Baron Kelvin. James attended Glasgow
Glasgow
University from a young age and graduated (1839) with high honors in his late teens. After graduation, he served brief apprenticeships with practical engineers in several domains; and then gave a considerable amount of his time to theoretical and mathematical engineering studies, often in collaboration with his brother, during his twenties in Glasgow
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Lord Kelvin
William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, OM, GCVO, PC, FRS, FRSE
FRSE
(26 June 1824 – 17 December 1907) was a Scots-Irish[1][2] mathematical physicist and engineer who was born in Belfast
Belfast
in 1824. At the University of Glasgow
Glasgow
he did important work in the mathematical analysis of electricity and formulation of the first and second laws of thermodynamics, and did much to unify the emerging discipline of physics in its modern form. He worked closely with mathematics professor Hugh Blackburn
Hugh Blackburn
in his work. He also had a career as an electric telegraph engineer and inventor, which propelled him into the public eye and ensured his wealth, fame and honour. For his work on the transatlantic telegraph project he was knighted in 1866 by Queen Victoria, becoming Sir William Thomson
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Circumference
In geometry, the circumference (from Latin circumferentia, meaning "carrying around") of a circle is the (linear) distance around it.[1] That is, the circumference would be the length of the circle if it were opened up and straightened out to a line segment. Since a circle is the edge (boundary) of a disk, circumference is a special case of perimeter.[2] The perimeter is the length around any closed figure and is the term used for most figures excepting the circle and some circular-like figures such as ellipses
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°
؋ ​₳ ​ ฿ ​₿ ​ ₵ ​¢ ​₡ ​₢ ​ $ ​₫ ​₯ ​֏ ​ ₠ ​€ ​ ƒ ​₣ ​ ₲ ​ ₴ ​ ₭ ​ ₺ ​₾ ​ ₼ ​ℳ ​₥ ​ ₦ ​ ₧ ​₱ ​₰ ​£ ​ 元 圆 圓 ​﷼ ​៛ ​₽ ​₹ ₨ ​ ₪ ​ ৳ ​₸ ​₮ ​ ₩ ​ ¥ 円Uncommon typographyasterism ⁂fleuron, hedera ❧index, fist ☞interrobang ‽irony punctuation ⸮lozenge ◊tie ⁀RelatedDiacritics Logic symbolsWhitespace charactersIn other scriptsChinese Hebrew Japanese Korean Category Portal Bookv t eThe degree symbol (°) is a typographical symbol that is used, among other things, to represent degrees of arc (e.g
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Queen's University Belfast
Queen's University
Queen's University
Belfast
Belfast
(informally Queen's or QUB) is a public research university in Belfast, Northern Ireland.[note 1] The university was chartered in 1845, and opened in 1849 as "Queen's College, Belfast". The university forms the focal point of the Queen's Quarter
Queen's Quarter
area of the city, one of Belfast's six cultural districts
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Θ
Theta
Theta
(UK: /ˈθiːtə/, US: /ˈθeɪtə/; uppercase Θ or ϴ, lowercase θ (which resembles digit 0 with horizontal line) or ϑ; Ancient Greek: θῆτα thē̂ta [tʰɛ̂ːta]; Modern: θήτα thī́ta [ˈθita]) is the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, derived from the Phoenician letter Teth
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Magnitude (mathematics)
In mathematics, magnitude is the size of a mathematical object, a property which determines whether the object is larger or smaller than other objects of the same kind
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Subtended
In geometry, an angle subtended by an arc, line segment, or other curve is one whose two rays pass through the endpoints of the arc. The precise meaning varies with the context. For example, one may speak of the angle subtended by an arc of a circumference when the angle's vertex is the centre of the circle to which the circumference belongs. A simple theorem of plane geometry states that arcs of equal lengths subtend equal angles in such a situation. See also[edit]Central angle Inscribed angleExternal links[edit]Definition of subtended angle, mathisfun.com, with interactive applet How an object subtends an angle, Math Open Reference, with interactive applet Angle
Angle
definition pages, Math Open Reference, with interactive applets that are also useful in a classroom setting.This Elementary geometry
Elementary geometry
related article is a stub
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Degree Symbol
؋ ​₳ ​ ฿ ​₿ ​ ₵ ​¢ ​₡ ​₢ ​ $ ​₫ ​₯ ​֏ ​ ₠ ​€ ​ ƒ ​₣ ​ ₲ ​ ₴ ​ ₭ ​ ₺ ​₾ ​ ₼ ​ℳ ​₥ ​ ₦ ​ ₧ ​₱ ​₰ ​£ ​ 元 圆 圓 ​﷼ ​៛ ​₽ ​₹ ₨ ​ ₪ ​ ৳ ​₸ ​₮ ​ ₩ ​ ¥ 円Uncommon typographyasterism ⁂fleuron, hedera ❧index, fist ☞interrobang ‽irony punctuation ⸮lozenge ◊tie ⁀RelatedDiacritics Logic symbolsWhitespace charactersIn other scriptsChinese Hebrew Japanese Korean Category Portal Bookv t eThe degree symbol (°) is a typographical symbol that is used, among other things, to represent degrees of arc (e.g
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Belfast
Belfast
Belfast
(/ˈbɛlfɑːst, -fæst/; from Irish: Béal Feirste), meaning "rivermouth of the sandbanks"[11] is the capital and largest city of Northern Ireland, and the second largest on the island of Ireland.[12] On the River Lagan, it had a population of 333,871 in 2015.[1] By the early 1800s the former town was home to a major port. Belfast played a key role in the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
in the 19th century, becoming the biggest linen producer in the world, earning it the nickname "Linenopolis". By the time it was granted city status in 1888, it was a major centre of the Irish linen as well as tobacco-processing, rope-making and shipbuilding industries. Harland and Wolff, which built the RMS Titanic, was the world's biggest and most productive shipyard.[13] It later also sustained a major aerospace and missiles industry
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Thomas Muir (mathematician)
Sir Thomas Muir FRS[1] FRSE CMG LLD (25 August 1844 – 21 March 1934) was a Scottish mathematician, remembered as an authority on determinants.[2][3][4]Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Publications by Sir Thomas Muir 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] He was born in Stonebyres in South Lanarkshire, and brought up in the small town of Biggar. He was educated at Wishaw Public School. At the University of Glasgow he changed his studies from classics to mathematics after advice from the future Lord Kelvin. After graduating he held positions at the University of St Andrews and the University of Glasgow. From 1874 to 1892 he taught at Glasgow High School. In 1882 he published Treatise on the theory of determinants; then in 1890 he published a History of determinants
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University Of St Andrews
University
University
of St Andrews                                 St Mary's College                                       School of Medicine                                 St Leonard's College                                 Affiliations EUA Europaeum Unive
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On-Line Encyclopedia Of Integer Sequences
The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences
On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences
(OEIS), also cited simply as Sloane's, is an online database of integer sequences. It was created and maintained by Neil Sloane
Neil Sloane
while a researcher at AT&T Labs. Foreseeing his retirement from AT&T Labs in 2012 and the need for an independent foundation, Sloane agreed to transfer the intellectual property and hosting of the OEIS to the OEIS Foundation in October 2009.[3] Sloane continues to be involved in the OEIS in his role as President of the OEIS Foundation. OEIS records information on integer sequences of interest to both professional mathematicians and amateurs, and is widely cited
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Unit Circle
In mathematics, a unit circle is a circle with a radius of one. Frequently, especially in trigonometry, the unit circle is the circle of radius one centered at the origin (0, 0) in the Cartesian coordinate system in the Euclidean plane. The unit circle is often denoted S1; the generalization to higher dimensions is the unit sphere. If (x, y) is a point on the unit circle's circumference, then x and y are the lengths of the legs of a right triangle whose hypotenuse has length 1. Thus, by the Pythagorean theorem, x and y satisfy the equation x 2 + y 2 = 1. displaystyle x^ 2 +y^ 2 =1
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