HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

RF Connector
A coaxial R F connector
F connector
(radio frequency connector) is an electrical connector designed to work at radio frequencies in the multi-megahertz range. RF connectors are typically used with coaxial cables and are designed to maintain the shielding that the coaxial design offers. Better models also minimize the change in transmission line impedance at the connection. Mechanically, they may provide a fastening mechanism (thread, bayonet, braces, blind mate) and springs for a low ohmic electric contact while sparing the gold surface, thus allowing very high mating cycles and reducing the insertion force
[...More...]

"RF Connector" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Coaxial Power Connector
A coaxial power connector is an electrical power connector used for attaching extra-low voltage devices such as consumer electronics to external electricity. Also known as barrel connectors, concentric barrel connectors or tip connectors, these small cylindrical connectors come in an enormous variety of sizes. Barrel plug connectors are commonly used to interface the secondary side of a power supply with the device
[...More...]

"Coaxial Power Connector" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Time-domain Reflectometry
Time-domain reflectometry or TDR is a measurement technique used to determine the characteristics of electrical lines by observing reflected waveforms.[1] Time-domain transmissometry (TDT) is an analogous technique that measures the transmitted (rather than reflected) impulse. Together, they provide a powerful means of analysing electrical or optical transmission media such as coaxial cable and optical fiber. Variations of TDR exist. For example, spread-spectrum time-domain reflectometry (SSTDR) is used to detect intermittent faults in complex and high-noise systems such as aircraft wiring.[2] Coherent optical time domain reflectometry (COTDR) is another variant, used in optical systems, in which the returned signal is mixed with a local oscillator and then filtered to reduce noise.[3] The impedance of the discontinuity can be determined from the amplitude of the reflected signal
[...More...]

"Time-domain Reflectometry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Radio Frequencies
Radio frequency (RF) is any of the electromagnetic wave frequencies that lie in the range extending from around 7004200000000000000♠20 kHz to 7011300000000000000♠300 GHz, roughly the frequencies used in radio communication.[1] The term does not have an official definition, and different sources specify slightly different upper and lower bounds for the frequency range. RF usually refers to electrical rather than mechanical oscillations. However, mechanical RF systems do exist (see mechanical filter and RF MEMS). Although radio frequency is a rate of oscillation, the term "radio frequency" or its abbreviation "RF" are used as a synonym for radio – i.e., to describe the use of wireless communication, as opposed to communication via electric wires
[...More...]

"Radio Frequencies" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Analog Video
Video
Video
is an electronic medium for the recording, copying, playback, broadcasting, and display of moving visual media.[1] Video
Video
was first developed for mechanical television systems, which were quickly replaced by cathode ray tube (CRT) systems which were later replaced by flat panel displays of several types. Video
Video
systems vary in display resolution, aspect ratio, refresh rate, color capabilities and other qualities
[...More...]

"Analog Video" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Characteristic Impedance
The characteristic impedance or surge impedance (usually written Z0) of a uniform transmission line is the ratio of the amplitudes of voltage and current of a single wave propagating along the line; that is, a wave travelling in one direction in the absence of reflections in the other direction. Characteristic impedance
Characteristic impedance
is determined by the geometry and materials of the transmission line and, for a uniform line, is not dependent on its length. The SI unit of characteristic impedance is the ohm. The characteristic impedance of a lossless transmission line is purely real, with no reactive component. Energy supplied by a source at one end of such a line is transmitted through the line without being dissipated in the line itself
[...More...]

"Characteristic Impedance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Screw Thread
A screw thread, often shortened to thread, is a helical structure used to convert between rotational and linear movement or force. A screw thread is a ridge wrapped around a cylinder or cone in the form of a helix, with the former being called a straight thread and the latter called a tapered thread. A screw thread is the essential feature of the screw as a simple machine and also as a fastener. The mechanical advantage of a screw thread depends on its lead, which is the linear distance the screw travels in one revolution.[1] In most applications, the lead of a screw thread is chosen so that friction is sufficient to prevent linear motion being converted to rotary, that is so the screw does not slip even when linear force is applied, as long as no external rotational force is present. This characteristic is essential to the vast majority of its uses
[...More...]

"Screw Thread" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bayonet Mount
A bayonet mount (mainly as a method of mechanical attachment, as for fitting a lens to a camera) or bayonet connector (for electrical use) is a fastening mechanism consisting of a cylindrical male side with one or more radial pins, and a female receptor with matching L-shaped slot(s) and with spring(s) to keep the two parts locked together
[...More...]

"Bayonet Mount" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Radio Spectrum
The radio spectrum is the part of the electromagnetic spectrum with frequencies from 3 Hz to 3 000 GHz (3 THz). Electromagnetic waves in this frequency range, called radio waves, are extremely widely used in modern technology, particularly in telecommunication
[...More...]

"Radio Spectrum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spring (device)
A spring is an elastic object that stores mechanical energy. Springs are typically made of spring steel. There are many spring designs. In everyday use, the term often refers to coil springs. When a conventional spring, without stiffness variability features, is compressed or stretched from its resting position, it exerts an opposing force approximately proportional to its change in length (this approximation breaks down for larger deflections). The rate or spring constant of a spring is the change in the force it exerts, divided by the change in deflection of the spring. That is, it is the gradient of the force versus deflection curve. An extension or compression spring's rate is expressed in units of force divided by distance, for example or N/m or lbf/in. A torsion spring is a spring that works by twisting; when it is twisted about its axis by an angle, it produces a torque proportional to the angle
[...More...]

"Spring (device)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Zero Insertion Force
Zero insertion force
Zero insertion force
(ZIF) is a type of IC socket or electrical connector that requires very little force for insertion. With a ZIF socket, before the IC is inserted, a lever or slider on the side of the socket is moved, pushing all the sprung contacts apart so that the IC can be inserted with very little force - generally the weight of the IC itself is sufficient and no external downward force is required. The lever is then moved back, allowing the contacts to close and grip the pins of the IC. ZIF sockets are much more expensive than standard IC sockets and also tend to take up a larger board area due to the space taken up by the lever mechanism
[...More...]

"Zero Insertion Force" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Radio Frequency
Radio
Radio
frequency (RF) is any of the electromagnetic wave frequencies that lie in the range extending from around 7004200000000000000♠20 kHz to 7011300000000000000♠300 GHz, roughly the frequencies used in radio communication.[1] The term does not have an official definition, and different sources specify slightly different upper and lower bounds for the frequency range. RF usually refers to electrical rather than mechanical oscillations. However, mechanical RF systems do exist (see mechanical filter and RF MEMS). Although radio frequency is a rate of oscillation, the term "radio frequency" or its abbreviation "RF" are used as a synonym for radio – i.e., to describe the use of wireless communication, as opposed to communication via electric wires
[...More...]

"Radio Frequency" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Optical Fiber Connector
An optical fiber connector terminates the end of an optical fiber, and enables quicker connection and disconnection than splicing. The connectors mechanically couple and align the cores of fibers so light can pass. Better connectors lose very little light due to reflection or misalignment of the fibers. In all, about 100 fiber optic connectors have been introduced to the market.[1]Contents1 Application 2 Types2.1 Obsolete connectors 2.2 Notes 2.3 Mnemonics 2.4 Field-mountable connectors3 Analysis 4 Testing 5 Notes 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksApplication[edit] Optical fiber connectors are used to join optical fibers where a connect/disconnect capability is required. Due to the polishing and tuning procedures that may be incorporated into optical connector manufacturing, connectors are generally assembled onto optical fiber in a supplier’s manufacturing facility
[...More...]

"Optical Fiber Connector" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

QMA And QN Connector
In computational complexity theory, QMA, which stands for Quantum Merlin Arthur, is the quantum analog of the nonprobabilistic complexity class NP or the probabilistic complexity class MA. It is related to BQP in the same way NP is related to P, or MA is related to BPP. Informally, it is the set of decision problems for which when the answer is YES, there is a polynomial-size quantum proof (a quantum state) which convinces a polynomial-time quantum verifier of the fact with high probability. Moreover, when the answer is NO, every polynomial-size quantum state is rejected by the verifier with high probability. More precisely, the proofs have to be verifiable in polynomial time on a quantum computer, such that if the answer is indeed YES, the verifier accepts a correct proof with probability greater than 2/3, and if the answer is NO, then there is no proof which convinces the verifier to accept with probability greater than 1/3
[...More...]

"QMA And QN Connector" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Composite Video
Composite video
Composite video
(one channel) is an analog video transmission (without audio) that carries standard definition video typically at 480i
480i
or 576i
576i
resolution. Video information is encoded on one channel, unlike the higher-quality S-video
S-video
(two channels) and the even higher-quality component video (three or more channels). Composite video
Composite video
mostly comes in three standard formats: NTSC, PAL, and SECAM
[...More...]

"Composite Video" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Component Video
Component video
Component video
is a video signal that has been split into two or more component channels. In popular use, it refers to a type of component analog video (CAV) information that is transmitted or stored as three separate signals. Component video
Component video
can be contrasted with composite video (NTSC, PAL
PAL
or SECAM) in which all the video information is combined into a single line level signal that is used in analog television
[...More...]

"Component Video" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.