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R.M.S. Titanic
RMS Titanic
Titanic
(/taɪˈtænɪk/) was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton
Southampton
to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff
Harland and Wolff
shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.[2] Titanic
Titanic
was under the command of Edward Smith, who also went down with the ship
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Titanic (1997 Film)
Titanic
Titanic
is a 1997 American epic romance-disaster film directed, written, co-produced and co-edited by James Cameron. A fictionalized account of the sinking of the RMS Titanic, it stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
as members of different social classes who fall in love aboard the ship during its ill-fated maiden voyage. Cameron's inspiration for the film came from his fascination with shipwrecks; he felt a love story interspersed with the human loss would be essential to convey the emotional impact of the disaster. Production began in 1995, when Cameron shot footage of the actual Titanic
Titanic
wreck. The modern scenes on the research vessel were shot on board the Akademik Mstislav Keldysh, which Cameron had used as a base when filming the wreck
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RMS Carpathia
RMS Carpathia
RMS Carpathia
was a Cunard Line
Cunard Line
transatlantic passenger steamship built by Swan Hunter
Swan Hunter
& Wigham Richardson. Carpathia made her maiden voyage in 1903 from Liverpool
Liverpool
to Boston (Massachusetts), and continued on this route before being transferred to Mediterranean service in 1904. In 1912, she became famous for rescuing the survivors of rival White Star Line's RMS Titanic after she struck an iceberg and sank with a loss of 1,517 lives. Carpathia braved dangerous ice fields and diverted all steam power to her engines in her rescue mission
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Wireless Telegraphy
Wireless
Wireless
telegraphy is the transmission of electric telegraphy signals without wires (wirelessly). The term is used synonymously for radio communication systems, also called radiotelegraphy, which transmit telegraph signals by radio waves
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Lifeboat (shipboard)
A lifeboat is a small, rigid or inflatable boat carried for emergency evacuation in the event of a disaster aboard a ship. Lifeboat drills are required by law on larger commercial ships. Rafts (liferafts) are also used. In the military, a lifeboat may double as a whaleboat, dinghy, or gig. The ship's tenders of cruise ships often double as lifeboats. Recreational sailors usually carry inflatable life rafts, though a few prefer small proactive lifeboats that are harder to sink and can be sailed to safety.Proactive lifeboat, sailing. Note unzipped middle section of canopy and reefed sail.An image depicting the sinking of RMS Titanic
RMS Titanic
surrounded by lifeboatsInflatable lifeboats may be equipped with auto-inflation (carbon dioxide or nitrogen) canisters or mechanical pumps
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Cherbourg
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Cherbourg-Octeville
Cherbourg-Octeville
(French pronunciation: ​[ʃɛʁ.buʁ ɔk.tə.vil]) is a city and former commune situated at the northern end of the Cotentin peninsula
Cotentin peninsula
in the northwestern French department of Manche. It is a subprefecture of its department, and was officially formed when the commune of Cherbourg absorbed Octeville on 28 February 2000.[1] On 1 January 2016, it was merged into the new commune of Cherbourg-en-Cotentin.[2] The city is a Maritime prefecture and sub-prefecture of la Manche
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Cobh
Cobh
Cobh
(/ˈkoʊv/ KOHV,  Irish: An Cóbh), known from 1849 until 1920 as Queenstown, is a tourist seaport town on the south coast of County Cork, Ireland. Cobh
Cobh
is on the south side of Great Island
Great Island
in Cork Harbour
Cork Harbour
and is home to Ireland's only dedicated cruise terminal. Tourism in the area draws on the maritime and emigration legacy of the town - including its association with the RMS Titanic, which was built in Belfast. Facing the town are Spike Island and Haulbowline
Haulbowline
Island
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Newfoundland (island)
Newfoundland
Newfoundland
(/ˈnjuːfən(d)lənd, -lænd, njuːˈfaʊndlənd/;[5] French: Terre-Neuve)[6] is a large Canadian island off the east coast of the North American mainland, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland
Newfoundland
and Labrador. It has 29 percent of the province's land area. The island is separated from the Labrador Peninsula by the Strait of Belle Isle
Strait of Belle Isle
and from Cape Breton Island
Cape Breton Island
by the Cabot Strait
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Hull (watercraft)
The hull is the watertight body of a ship or boat. Above the hull is the superstructure and/or deckhouse, where present. The line where the hull meets the water surface is called the waterline. The structure of the hull varies depending on the vessel type. In a typical modern steel ship, the structure consists of watertight and non-tight decks, major transverse and watertight (and also sometimes non-tight or longitudinal) members called bulkheads, intermediate members such as girders, stringers and webs, and minor members called ordinary transverse frames, frames, or longitudinals, depending on the structural arrangement. The uppermost continuous deck may be called the "upper deck", "weather deck", "spar deck", "main deck", or simply "deck". The particular name given depends on the context—the type of ship or boat, the arrangement, or even where it sails
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Port And Starboard
Port and starboard
Port and starboard
are nautical and aeronautical terms for left and right, respectively. Port is the left-hand side of a vessel or aircraft, facing forward. Starboard is the right-hand side, facing forward. Since port and starboard never change, they are unambiguous references that are not relative to the observer.[2][3] The term starboard derives from the Old English steorbord, meaning the side on which the ship is steered. Before ships had rudders on their centrelines, they were steered with a steering oar at the stern of the ship and, because more people are right-handed, on the right-hand side of it.[2] Since the steering oar was on the right side of the boat, it would tie up at the wharf on the other side. Hence the left side was called port.[4] Formerly, larboard was used instead of port
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Compartment (ship)
A compartment is a portion of the space within a ship defined vertically between decks and horizontally between bulkheads. It is analogous to a room within a building, and may provide watertight subdivision of the ship's hull important in retaining buoyancy if the hull is damaged
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Women And Children First
"Women and children first" (or to a lesser extent, the Birkenhead Drill[1][2]) is a code of conduct dating from 1852, whereby the lives of women and children were to be saved first in a life-threatening situation, typically abandoning ship, when survival resources such as lifeboats were limited. While the phrase first appeared in the 1860 novel Harrington: A Story of True Love, by William Douglas O'Connor,[3][4] the first documented application of "women and children first" occurred during the 1852 evacuation of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
troopship HMS Birkenhead.[5] It is, however, most famously associated with the sinking of RMS Titanic
RMS Titanic
in 1912. As a code of conduct, "women and children first" has no basis in maritime law
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Changes In Safety Practices After The Sinking Of The RMS Titanic
The sinking of the RMS Titanic
RMS Titanic
resulted in the following changes in maritime policy.Contents1 Lifeboats 2 24-hour radio watch and distress rockets 3 International Ice Patrol 4 Ship design changes 5 ReferencesLifeboats[edit]Titanic's recovered lifeboatsAlexander Carlisle, Harland and Wolff's general manager and chairman of the managing directors, suggested that Titanic
Titanic
use a new, larger type of davit which could give the ship the potential to carry 48 lifeboats; this would have provided enough seats for everyone on board
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The Captain Goes Down With The Ship
"The captain goes down with the ship" is an idiom and maritime tradition that a sea captain holds ultimate responsibility for both his ship and everyone embarked on it, and that in an emergency, he will either save them or die trying. Although often connected to the sinking of the RMS Titanic
RMS Titanic
in 1912 and its captain, Edward J. Smith, the phrase precedes Titanic by at least 11 years.[1] In most instances the captain of the ship forgoes his own rapid departure of a ship in distress, and concentrates instead on saving other people
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International Convention For The Safety Of Life At Sea
The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) is an international maritime treaty which sets minimum safety standards in the construction, equipment and operation of merchant ships. The convention requires signatory flag states to ensure that ships flagged by them comply with at least these standards
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RMS Titanic In Popular Culture
The RMS Titanic
RMS Titanic
has subsequently played a prominent role in popular culture since her sinking in 1912, with the loss of over 1,500 of the 2,200 lives on board. The disaster and the Titanic
Titanic
herself have been objects of public fascination for many years. They have inspired numerous books, plays, films, songs, poems, and works of art. Titanic's story has been interpreted in many overlapping ways, including as a symbol of technological hubris, as basis for fail-safe improvements, as a classic disaster tale, as an indictment of the class divisions of the time, and as romantic tragedies with personal heroism
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