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Qur'an
The Quran
Quran
(/kɔːrˈɑːn/[a] kor-AHN; Arabic: القرآن‎ al-Qurʾān,[b] literally meaning "the recitation"; also romanized Qur'an or Koran[c]) is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God
God
(Allah).[1] It is widely regarded as the finest work in classical Arabic literature
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Ahmadiyya Translations Of The Quran
Translations
Translations
is a three-act play by Irish playwright Brian Friel, written in 1980. It is set in Baile Beag (Ballybeg), a Donegal village in 19th century agricultural Ireland. Friel has said that Translations is "a play about language and only about language", but it deals with a wide range of issues, stretching from language and communication to Irish history and cultural imperialism. Friel responds strongly to both political and language questions in the modern-day Republic of Ireland
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Book
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
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Romanization Of Arabic
The romanization of Arabic
Arabic
writes written and spoken Arabic
Arabic
in the Latin script
Latin script
in one of various systematic ways. Romanized Arabic
Arabic
is used for a number of different purposes, among them transcription of names and titles, cataloging Arabic language
Arabic language
works, language education when used in lieu of or alongside the Arabic
Arabic
script, and representation of the language in scientific publications by linguists
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Samarkand Kufic Quran
The Samarkand
Samarkand
Kufic
Kufic
Quran
Quran
(also known as the Uthman Quran, Samarkand codex, Samarkand
Samarkand
manuscript and Tashkent
Tashkent
Quran) is an 8th or 9th century manuscript Quran
Quran
written in the territory of modern Iraq
Iraq
in the Kufic
Kufic
script
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Arabic Language
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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Quranic Infallibility
Quranic infallibility is a doctrine central to the Muslim
Muslim
faith that the Quran
Quran
is the infallible and inerrant word of God as revealed to Muhammad
Muhammad
by the archangel Gabriel fourteen hundred years ago.[1][2] References[edit]^ Braswell, George W. (2000). What You Need to Know about Islam & Muslims. B&H Publishing Group. ISBN 9780805418293.  ^ Anwar, Syed Shakeel Ahmed (2007). The Holy Quran
Quran
is Infallible: A Critique of the Book
Book
"Is the Qur'an Infallible?" by 'Abdullah 'Abdal-Fadi, a Minister of Christ. Telugu Islamic Publications Trust. ISBN 9788188241736. This article related to the Quran
Quran
is a stub
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Topkapi Manuscript
The Topkapi manuscript
Topkapi manuscript
is an early manuscript of the Quran
Quran
dated to the late 1st century / early 2nd century AH (i.e. early to mid 8th century AD)[citation needed] This manuscript is kept in the Topkapi Palace
Topkapi Palace
Museum, Istanbul, Turkey. It is attributed to Uthman Ibn Affan
Uthman Ibn Affan
(d. 656) Similar illuminations can be found in the Dome of the Rock
Dome of the Rock
in Jerusalem, the Umayyad Mosque
Umayyad Mosque
in Damascus and other Umayyad monuments. The size of this manuscript is 41 cm x 46 cm. It contains more than 99% of the text of the Qur'an
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Ayah
Āyah (/ˈɑːjə/; Arabic: آية‎; plural: āyāt آيات) means "evidence", "sign" or "Miracle". In the context of Islam's principal scripture, the Quran, ayah is used to mean "verse", i.e. each statement or paragraph marked by a number.تِلْكَ ءَايَٰتُ ٱللَّهِ نَتْلُوهَا عَلَيْكَ بِٱلْحَقِّۖ فَبِأَىِّ حَدِيثٍۭ بَعْدَ ٱللَّهِ وَءَايَٰتِهِۦ يُؤْمِنُونَ — Qur'an 45:6; translation by Muhammad
Muhammad
Muhsin Khan: "These are the Ayat (proofs, evidences, verses, lessons, revelations, etc.) of God, which We recite to you, O Muhammad, with truth. Then in which speech after God and His Ayat (plural of ayah) will they believe?"Overview[edit] Although meaning "verse" when using the Quran, it is doubtful whether "ayah" means anything other than "sign" or "remarkable event" in the Quran's text
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Juz'
A juzʼ (Arabic: جُزْءْ‎, plural أَجْزَاءْ ajzāʼ, literally meaning "part") is one of thirty parts of varying lengths into which the Quran
Quran
is sometimes divided. Overview[edit] Division into juz has no relevance to the meaning of the Quran
Quran
and anyone can start reading from anywhere in the Quran.[1] During medieval times, when it was too costly for most Muslims to purchase a manuscript, copies of the Quran
Quran
were held in mosques in order to make them accessible to people; these copies frequently took the form of a series of thirty parts ('juz').[2] Some use these divisions to facilitate recitation of the Quran
Quran
in a month – especially during Ramadan, when the entire Quran
Quran
is recited in the Tarawih prayers,[citation needed] reciting approximately one juz a night
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Religious Text
Religious texts (also known as scripture, or scriptures, from the Latin
Latin
scriptura, meaning "writing") are texts which religious traditions consider to be central to their practice or beliefs. Religious texts may be used to provide meaning and purpose, evoke a deeper connection with the divine, convey religious truths, promote religious experience, foster communal identity, and guide individual and communal religious practice
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Quranic Createdness
Createdness refers to the doctrinal position that the Qur’an
Qur’an
was created, rather than having always existed and thus being "uncreated". The dispute over which was true became a significant point of contention in early Islam. The Islamic rationalist philosophical school known as the Mu'tazila
Mu'tazila
held that if the Quran
Quran
is God's word, logically God "must have preceded his own speech".[1] Traditionists, on the other hand, held the numerous hadith support the contention that Qur’an
Qur’an
was co-eternal with God and hence, uncreated
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List Of People Related To Quranic Verses
This page is a List of people related to Quranic verses:Contents1 Ahl al-Bayt1.1 Generally1.1.1 3:61 1.1.2 33:331.2 Ali
Ali
ibn Abu Talib1.2.1 2.207 1.2.2 5.3 1.2.3 5.55 1.2.4 13.72 Muhammad's wives2.1 Khadija 2.2 Hafsa 2.3 Zaynab bint Jahsh2.3.1 33:362.4 Sawda bint Zama2.4.1 [Quran 4:127]3 Clans3.1 Banu Abd-al-Manaf3.1.1 Generally3.1.1.1 102.1-23.1.2 A'as ibn Wa'il3.1.2.1 1083.2 Banu Sahm3.2.1 Generally3.2.1.1 102.1-23.3 Banu Makhzum3.3.1 Walid ibn al-Mughira3.3.1.1 [Quran 68:10]-133.4 Banu Zuhr
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Allah
Allah
Allah
(/ˈælə, ˈɑːlə, əlˈlɑː/;[1][2] Arabic: الله‎, translit. Allāh, pronounced [ɑɫˈɫɑː(h)] ( listen)) is the Arabic word for God
God
in Abrahamic religions
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Medinan Surah
The Medinan Surahs or Medinan chapters of the Quran
Quran
are the latest 24 Surahs that, according to Islamic tradition, were revealed at Medina after Muhammad's hijra from Mecca. These surahs were revealed by God when the Muslim
Muslim
community was larger and more developed, as opposed to their minority position in Mecca.[1] The Medinan Surahs occur mostly at the beginning and in the middle of the Qur'an
Qur'an
(but are said to be the last revealed suras chronologically), and typically have more and longer ayat (verses). Due to the new circumstances of the early Muslim
Muslim
community in Medina, these surahs more often deal with details of moral principles, legislation, warfare (as in Surah
Surah
2, al-Baqara), and principles for constituting and ordering the community
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Qāriʾ
A qāriʾ (Arabic: قَارِئ‎, plural قُرَّاء qurrāʾ; English: "reader") is a person who recites the Quran
Quran
with the proper rules of recitation (tajwid).[1] Although it is encouraged, a qāriʾ does not necessarily have to memorise the Qur'an, just to recite it according to the rules of tajwid with melodious sound.Contents1 Notable Qāri1.1 Bahrain 1.2 Bangladesh 1.3 Egypt 1.4 India 1.5 Indonesia 1.6 Kuwait 1.7 Pakistan 1.8 Saudi Arabia2 References 3 External linksNotable Qāri[edit] The following list is a partial list of some notable reciters of the Qur'an:Bahrain[
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