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QuickBasic
Microsoft
Microsoft
Quick BASIC
BASIC
(also QB) is an Integrated Development Environment (or IDE) and compiler for the BASIC
BASIC
programming language that was developed by Microsoft. Quick BASIC
BASIC
runs mainly on DOS, though there was a short-lived version for the classic Mac OS. It is loosely based on GW- BASIC
BASIC
but adds user-defined types, improved programming structures, better graphics and disk support and a compiler in addition to the interpreter
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I/O Port
Memory-mapped I/O (MMIO) and port-mapped I/O (PMIO) (which is also called isolated I/O[citation needed]) are two complementary methods of performing input/output (I/O) between the central processing unit (CPU) and peripheral devices in a computer. An alternative approach is using dedicated I/O processors, commonly known as channels on mainframe computers, which execute their own instructions. Memory-mapped I/O uses the same address space to address both memory and I/O devices. The memory and registers of the I/O devices are mapped to (associated with) address values. So when an address is accessed by the CPU, it may refer to a portion of physical RAM, or it can instead refer to memory of the I/O device. Thus, the CPU instructions used to access the memory can also be used for accessing devices
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Personal Computer Hardware
Computer
Computer
hardware are the physical parts or components of a computer, such as the monitor, keyboard, computer data storage, graphic card, sound card and motherboard.[1] By contrast, software is instructions that can be stored and ran by hardware. Hardware is directed by the software to execute any command or instruction
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Hello, World
A "Hello, World!" program
"Hello, World!" program
is a computer program that outputs or displays "Hello, World!" to a user
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Video Game
A video game is an electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but as of the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Some theorists categorize video games as an art form, but this designation is controversial. The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices
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GUI
The graphical user interface (GUI /ɡuːiː/), is a type of user interface that allows users to interact with electronic devices through graphical icons and visual indicators such as secondary notation, instead of text-based user interfaces, typed command labels or text navigation. GUIs were introduced in reaction to the perceived steep learning curve of command-line interfaces (CLIs),[1][2][3] which require commands to be typed on a computer keyboard. The actions in a GUI are usually performed through direct manipulation of the graphical elements.[4] Beyond computers, GUIs are used in many handheld mobile devices such as MP3
MP3
players, portable media players, gaming devices, smartphones and smaller household, office and industrial controls
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Utility Software
Utility software is system software designed to help analyze, configure, optimize or maintain a computer.[1] It is used to support the computer infrastructure in contrast to application software, which is aimed at directly performing tasks that benefit ordinary users. Although a basic set of utility programs is usually distributed with an operating system (OS), utility software is not considered part of the operating system, and users often install replacements or additional utilities.it provides additinoal facilities to carry out tasks which are beyond the capabilities of the operating systemContents1 Types of utilities1.1 System utilities 1.2 Storage device management utilities 1.3 File management utilities 1.4 Miscellaneous utilities2 References 3 See alsoTypes of utilities[edit] System utilities[edit]
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Message Board
An Internet
Internet
forum, or message board, is an online discussion site where people can hold conversations in the form of posted messages.[1] They differ from chat rooms in that messages are often longer than one line of text, and are at least temporarily archived. Also, depending on the access level of a user or the forum set-up, a posted message might need to be approved by a moderator before it becomes visible. Forums have a specific set of jargon associated with them; example: a single conversation is called a "thread", or topic. A discussion forum is hierarchical or tree-like in structure: a forum can contain a number of subforums, each of which may have several topics. Within a forum's topic, each new discussion started is called a thread, and can be replied to by as many people as so wish. Depending on the forum's settings, users can be anonymous or have to register with the forum and then subsequently log in in order to post messages
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Online Magazine
An online magazine is a magazine published on the Internet, through bulletin board systems and other forms of public computer networks. One of the first magazines to convert from a print magazine format to being online only was the computer magazine Datamation. Some online magazines distributed through the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
call themselves webzines.[1] An ezine (also spelled e-zine) is a more specialized term appropriately used for small magazines and newsletters distributed by any electronic method, for example, by electronic mail (e-mail/email, see Zine). Some social groups may use the terms cyberzine and hyperzine when referring to electronically distributed resources
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Emulator
In computing, an emulator is hardware or software that enables one computer system (called the host) to behave like another computer system (called the guest). An emulator typically enables the host system to run software or use peripheral devices designed for the guest system. Emulation refers to the ability of a computer program in an electronic device to emulate (or imitate) another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard
Hewlett-Packard
LaserJet
LaserJet
printers because so much software is written for HP printers. If a non-HP printer emulates an HP printer, any software written for a real HP printer will also run in the non-HP printer emulation and produce equivalent printing
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DOSBox
DOSBox
DOSBox
is an emulator program which emulates an IBM PC compatible computer running a DOS
DOS
operating system. Many IBM PC compatible graphics and sound cards are also emulated. This means that original DOS
DOS
programs (including PC games) are provided with an environment in which they can run correctly, even though the modern computers have dropped support for that old environment. DOSBox
DOSBox
is free software written primarily in C++
C++
and distributed under the GNU General Public License
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TCP/IP
The Internet protocol
Internet protocol
suite is the conceptual model and set of communications protocols used on the Internet
Internet
and similar computer networks. It is commonly known as TCP/IP because the foundational protocols in the suite are the Transmission Control Protocol
Transmission Control Protocol
(TCP) and the Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP). It is occasionally known as the Department of Defense (DoD) model, because the development of the networking method was funded by the United States Department of Defense
United States Department of Defense
through DARPA. The Internet protocol
Internet protocol
suite provides end-to-end data communication specifying how data should be packetized, addressed, transmitted, routed, and received
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System 7
System 7
System 7
(codenamed "Big Bang" and sometimes retrospectively called Mac OS 7) is a graphical user interface-based operating system for Macintosh
Macintosh
computers and is part of the classic Mac OS series of operating systems. It was introduced on May 13, 1991, by Apple Computer, Inc.[1] It succeeded System 6, and was the main Macintosh operating system until it was succeeded by Mac OS 8
Mac OS 8
in 1997. Features added with the System 7
System 7
release included virtual memory, personal file sharing, QuickTime, QuickDraw 3D, and an improved user interface. "System 7" is often used generically to refer to all 7.x versions. With the release of version 7.6 in 1997, Apple officially renamed the operating system "Mac OS", a name which had first appeared on System 7.5.1's boot screen
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Vintage Computer
Retrocomputing is the use of older computer hardware and software in modern times. Retrocomputing is usually classed as a hobby and recreation rather than a practical application of technology; enthusiasts often collect rare and valuable hardware and software for sentimental reasons. However, some do make use of it.[1] Retrocomputing often starts when a computer user realizes that formerly expensive fantasy systems like IBM mainframes, Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) superminis, or Silicon Graphics (SGI), even NeXT Computer System workstations have become affordable on the used computer market, usually in a relatively short time after the computers' era of use. Many hobbyists have collections of working vintage computers such as Apple IIs, IBM PCs, ZX Spectrums, Amstrad, Atari, Commodore, Amigas and BBC Micros
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Local Area Network
A local area network (LAN) is a computer network that interconnects computers within a limited area such as a residence, school, laboratory, university campus or office building.[1] By contrast, a wide area network (WAN) not only covers a larger geographic distance, but also generally involves leased telecommunication circuits. Ethernet
Ethernet
and Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
are the two most common technologies in use for local area networks. Historical technologies include ARCNET, Token ring, and AppleTalk.Contents1 History 2 Cabling 3 Wireless media 4 Technical aspects 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The increasing demand and use of computers in universities and research labs in the late 1960s generated the need to provide high-speed interconnections between computer systems
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8088
The Intel 8088
Intel 8088
("eighty-eighty-eight", also called iAPX 88)[1][2][3] microprocessor is a variant of the Intel 8086. Introduced on July 1, 1979, the 8088 had an eight-bit external data bus instead of the 16-bit bus of the 8086. The 16-bit registers and the one megabyte address range were unchanged, however. In fact, according to the Intel documentation, the 8086
8086
and 8088 have the same execution unit (EU)—only the bus interface unit (BIU) is different
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