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Quadrille
The quadrille is a dance that was fashionable in late 18th- and 19th-century Europe and its colonies. Performed by four couples in a rectangular formation, it is related to American square dancing. The Lancers, a variant of the quadrille, became popular in the late 19th century and was still danced in the 20th century in folk-dance clubs. A derivative found in the Francophone Lesser Antilles
Lesser Antilles
is known as kwadril, and the dance is also still found in Madagascar
Madagascar
and is within old Jamaican / Caribbean culture. The quadrille consists of a chain of four to six contredanses, courtly versions of English country dances that had been taken up at the court of Louis XIV
Louis XIV
and spread across Europe
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Waltz
The waltz (from German Walzer [ˈvalt͡sɐ̯]) is a ballroom and folk dance, normally in  triple (help·info) time, performed primarily in closed position.Contents1 History 2 Variants 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]Play mediaWaltzThere are several references to a sliding or gliding dance that would evolve into the waltz that dates from 16th century Europe, including the representations of the printmaker Hans Sebald Beham
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Chassé
Chasse [ʃas] or chassé [ʃase] (French for "to chase") is a dance step used in many dances in many variations. All variations are triple-step patterns of gliding character in a "step-together-step" pattern. The word came from ballet terminology.Contents1 Varieties 2 Ballet 3 Ballroom 4 Ice dancing
Ice dancing
or roller dancing 5 Line dancing 6 ReferencesVarieties[edit] There is a large variety of Chasses across many dances. Variations include:The direction may be sideways, diagonal or even curving. Sizes of steps may vary. This also concerns the second, "Together", step: the moving foot may land right beside the standing foot or leave some space, or even barely move from its previous position. Timing may vary
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Lewis Carroll
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (/ˈlʌtwɪdʒ ˈdɒdsən/;[1][2][3] 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll (/ˈkærəl/), was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican
Anglican
deacon, and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem "Jabberwocky", and the poem The Hunting of the Snark – all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic and fantasy
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Balance Of Power In International Relations
The balance of power theory in international relations suggests that national security is enhanced when military capability is distributed so that no one state is strong enough to dominate all others.[1] If one state becomes much stronger than others, the theory predicts that it will take advantage of its strength and attack weaker neighbors, thereby providing an incentive for those threatened to unite in a defensive coalition. Some realists maintain that this would be more stable as aggression would appear unattractive and would be averted if there was equilibrium of power between the rival coalitions.[1] When confronted by a significant external threat, states that wish to form alliances may "balance" or "bandwagon"
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Josef Lanner
Joseph Lanner
Joseph Lanner
(12 April 1801 – 14 April 1843) was an Austrian dance music composer.[1] He is best remembered as one of the earliest Viennese composers to reform the waltz from a simple peasant dance to something that even the highest society could enjoy, either as an accompaniment to the dance, or for the music's own sake. He was just as famous as his friend and musical rival Johann Strauss I, who was better known outside of Austria
Austria
in their day because of his concert tours abroad, in particular, to France and England. Lanner had a lesser-known son, August Lanner,[1] who was just as musically gifted and prodigious as his father, but whose budding career was cut short by his early death at age 20
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Dance
Dance
Dance
is a performing art form consisting of purposefully selected sequences of human movement. This movement has aesthetic and symbolic value, and is acknowledged as dance by performers and observers within a particular culture.[nb 1] Dance
Dance
can be categorized and described by its choreography, by its repertoire of movements, or by its historical period or place of origin. An important distinction is to be drawn between the contexts of theatrical and participatory dance,[4] although these two categories are not always completely separate; both may have special functions, whether social, ceremonial, competitive, erotic, martial, or sacred/liturgical
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Arabesque (ballet Position)
Arabesque (French: [aʁabɛsk]; literally, "in Arabic fashion") in dance, particularly ballet, is a body position in which a dancer stands on one leg – the supporting leg – with the other leg – the working leg – turned out and extended behind the body, with both legs held straight. In classical ballet, an arabesque can be executed with the supporting leg en pointe or demi pointe or with foot flat on the floor. The working leg may touch the floor in tendu back – an arabesque par terre – or be elevated. Common elevation angles of the raised leg are 45° – à demi hauteur – and 90° – à la hauteur. When the angle is much greater than 90° and the body trunk leans forward to counterbalance the working leg, the position is called arabesque penché (or penchée, a common misspelling of the French word[1])
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Croisé
Because ballet became formalized in France, a significant part of ballet terminology is in the French language.ContentsTop A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZSee also References External linksA[edit] À la seconde[edit] (French pronunciation: ​[a la səɡɔ̃d]) A position of the leg to the side with the body facing directly forward ("en face"). À la quatrième[edit] (French pronunciation: ​[a la katʁijɛm]) One of the directions of body, facing the audience (en face), arms in second position, with one leg extended either to fourth position in front (quatrième devant) or fourth position behind (quatrième derrière). À terre[edit] (French pronunciation: ​[a tɛʁ]) Touching the floor. Adagio[edit] Italian, or French adage, meaning 'slowly, at ease.'Slow movements performed with fluidity and grace. One of the typical exercises of a traditional ballet class, done both at barre and in center, featuring slow, contr
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Ballet
Ballet
Ballet
/ˈbæleɪ/ (French: [balɛ]) is a type of performance dance that originated during the Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
in the 15th century and later developed into a concert dance form in France and Russia. It has since become a widespread, highly technical form of dance with its own vocabulary based on French terminology. It has been globally influential and has defined the foundational techniques used in many other dance genres and cultures. Ballet
Ballet
has been taught in various schools around the world, which have historically incorporated their own cultures to evolve the art. See glossary of ballet. A ballet, a work, consists of the choreography and music for a ballet production
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Louis XIV
Louis XIV (5 September 1638 – 1 September 1715), known as Louis the God-Given (Louis Dieudonné), Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (Roi Soleil), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon
House of Bourbon
who reigned as King of France
King of France
from 1643 until his death in 1715. Starting at the age of 4, his reign of 72 years and 110 days is the longest recorded of any monarch of a sovereign country in European history.[1][2] In the age of absolutism in Europe, Louis XIV's France was a leader in the growing centralization of power.[3] Louis began his personal rule of France
France
in 1661, after the death of his chief minister, the Italian Cardinal Mazarin.[4] An adherent of the concept of the divine right of kings, which advocates the divine origin of monarchical rule, Louis continued his predecessors' work of creating a centralized state governed from the capital
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Madagascar
Madagascar
Madagascar
(/ˌmædəˈɡæskər/; Malagasy: Madagasikara), officially the Republic of Madagascar
Madagascar
(Malagasy: Repoblikan'i Madagasikara [republiˈkʲan madaɡasˈkʲarə̥]; French: République de Madagascar), and previously known as the Malagasy Republic, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of East Africa. The nation comprises the island of Madagascar
Madagascar
(the fourth-largest island in the world), and numerous smaller peripheral islands. Following the prehistoric breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana, Madagascar
Madagascar
split from the Indian peninsula
Indian peninsula
around 88 million years ago, allowing native plants and animals to evolve in relative isolation. Consequently, Madagascar
Madagascar
is a biodiversity hotspot; over 90% of its wildlife is found nowhere else on Earth
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Lesser Antilles
The Lesser Antilles
Antilles
are a group of islands in the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. Most form a long, partly volcanic island arc between the Greater Antilles to the north-west and the continent of South America.[1] The islands form the eastern boundary of the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea with the Atlantic Ocean. Together, the Lesser Antilles
Antilles
and the Greater Antilles
Greater Antilles
compose the Antilles
Antilles
(or the Caribbean
Caribbean
in its narrowest definition)
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