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Q (magazine)
Q is a popular music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom. Q was founded in 1986 by Mark Ellen and David Hepworth, who were dismayed by the music press of the time, which they felt was ignoring a generation of older music buyers who were buying CDs — then still a new technology. Q was first published by the EMAP
EMAP
media group in October 1986, setting itself apart from much of the other music press with monthly production and higher standards of photography and printing. In the early years, the magazine was sub-titled "The modern guide to music and more". Originally it was to be called Cue (as in the sense of cueing a record, ready to play), but the name was changed so that it wouldn't be mistaken for a snooker magazine
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FourFourTwo
FourFourTwo
FourFourTwo
is a football magazine published by Haymarket. Issued monthly, it published its 200th edition in February 2011
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Radio
Radio
Radio
is the technology of using radio waves to carry information, such as sound, by systematically modulating properties of electromagnetic energy waves transmitted through space, such as their amplitude, frequency, phase, or pulse width.[n 1] When radio waves strike an electrical conductor, the oscillating fields induce an alternating current in the conductor. The information in the waves can be extracted and transformed back into its original form. Radio
Radio
systems need a transmitter to modulate (change) some property of the energy produced to impress a signal on it, for example using amplitude modulation or angle modulation (which can be frequency modulation or phase modulation). Radio
Radio
systems also need an antenna to convert electric currents into radio waves, and radio waves into an electric current. An antenna can be used for both transmitting and receiving
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Elvis Presley
Elvis
Elvis
Aaron Presley[a] (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977) was an American singer and actor. Regarded as one of the most significant cultural icons of the 20th century, he is often referred to as the "King of Rock and Roll" or simply "the King". Presley was born in Tupelo, Mississippi, and relocated to Memphis, Tennessee, with his family when he was 13 years old. His music career began there in 1954, recording at Sun Records
Sun Records
with producer Sam Phillips, who wanted to bring the sound of African American music
African American music
to a wider audience. Accompanied by guitarist Scotty Moore and bassist Bill Black, Presley was a pioneer of rockabilly, an uptempo, backbeat-driven fusion of country music and rhythm and blues. In 1955, drummer D. J. Fontana
D. J

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War On Want
War on Want
War on Want
is an anti-poverty charity based in London. War on Want works to challenge the root causes of poverty, inequality and injustice through partnership with social movements in the global South and by running hard-hitting campaigns in the UK in support of radical change. War on Want's slogan is "poverty is political" and its stated focus is on the root causes of poverty rather than its effects; it raises public awareness of the root causes of poverty, inequality and injustice, and empowers people to take action for change. War on Want
War on Want
is a membership organisation governed by an elected Council of Management drawn from its membership
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Radio Station
A radio station is a set of equipment necessary to carry on communication via radio waves. Generally, it is a receiver or transmitter, an antenna, and some smaller additional equipment necessary to operate them. Radio stations
Radio stations
play a vital role in communication technology as they are heavily relied on to transfer data and information across the world.[1] More broadly, the definition of a radio station includes the aforementioned equipment and a building in which it is installed. Such a station may include several "radio stations" defined above (i.e. several sets of receivers or transmitters installed in one building but functioning independently, and several antennas installed on a field next to the building). This definition of a radio station is more often referred to as a transmitter site, transmitter station, transmission facility or transmitting station
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Digital Television
Digital television
Digital television
(DTV) is the transmission of television signals, including the sound channel, using digital encoding, in contrast to the earlier television technology, analog television, in which the video and audio are carried by analog signals. It is an innovative advance that represents the first significant evolution in television technology since color television in the 1950s.[1] Digital TV makes more economical use of scarce radio spectrum space; it can transmit multiple channels in the same bandwidth occupied by a single channel of analog television,[2] and provides many new features that analog television cannot. A switchover from analog to digital broadcasting began around 2006 in some countries, and many industrial countries have now completed the changeover, while other countries are in various stages of adaptation
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Glastonbury Festival
Glastonbury
Glastonbury
Festival is a five-day festival of contemporary performing arts that takes place near Pilton, Somerset, England. In addition to contemporary music, the festival hosts dance, comedy, theatre, circus, cabaret, and other arts. Leading pop and rock artists have headlined, alongside thousands of others appearing on smaller stages and performance areas. Films and albums recorded at Glastonbury
Glastonbury
have been released, and the festival receives extensive television and newspaper coverage. Glastonbury
Glastonbury
is the largest greenfield festival in the world, and is now attended by around 175,000 people,[2] requiring extensive infrastructure in terms of security, transport, water, and electricity supply
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Ten Commandments
The Ten
The Ten
Commandments, also known as the Decalogue, are a set of biblical laws relating to ethics and worship, which play a fundamental role in Judaism
Judaism
and Christianity. The commandments include instructions to worship only God, to honour one's parents, and to keep the sabbath, as well as prohibitions against idolatry, blasphemy, murder, adultery, theft, dishonesty, and coveting. Different religious groups follow different traditions for interpreting and numbering them. The Ten
The Ten
Commandments appear twice in the Hebrew Bible, in the books of Exodus and Deuteronomy
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List Of Magazines By Circulation
The following list of the magazines in the world by circulation is based upon the number of copies distributed, on average, for each issue.Contents1 Lists by country and continent1.1 Asia1.1.1 India 1.1.2 Japan1.2 Europe1.2.1 France 1.2.2 Germany 1.2.3 Netherlands 1.2.4 Russia 1.2.5 Spain 1.2.6 Sweden 1.2.7 United Kingdom1.3 North America1.3.1 Canada 1.3.2 United States1.4 Oceania1.4.1 Australia 1.4.2 New Zealand1.5 South America2 See also 3 Notes 4 External linksLists by country and continent[edit] The following are lists of magazines from selected countries/regions, sorted by overall circulation: Asia[edit] This is a partial list of magazines from various Asian countries, sorted by their circulation, in first quarter (Q1) 2009:[citation needed]Rank Name Circulation Publisher1 infobank 7005150000000000000♠150,000 infonews bank2 Gatra 7005145000000000000♠145,000 Indonesia
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Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
(/ˈbɜːrmɪŋəm/ ( listen),[3] locally /ˈbɜːmɪŋ(ɡ)əm/ or /ˈbɜːmɪnəm/) is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands of England, standing on the River Rea
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Schott's Original Miscellany
Schott's Miscellanies are a set of best-selling books by Ben Schott. They consist of a collection of trivia generally centred on the culture of the United Kingdom (and to a lesser extent the rest of the European Union and the Commonwealth). Bloomsbury published the first book in 2002, to widespread acclaim. The books are as follows: Schott's Original Miscellany, Schott's Food & Drink Miscellany, Schott's Sporting, Gaming & Idling Miscellany, and Schott's Quintessential Miscellany. Together the first three books have sold over two million copies, and Schott's Original Miscellany has been translated into more than 13 languages (including Japanese)
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Compact Disc
Compact disc
Compact disc
(CD) is a digital optical disc data storage format that was co-developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
and released in 1982. The format was originally developed to store and play only sound recordings but was later adapted for storage of data (CD-ROM). Several other formats were further derived from these, including write-once audio and data storage (CD-R), rewritable media (CD-RW), Video Compact Disc (VCD), Super Video Compact Disc (SVCD), Photo CD, PictureCD, CD-i, and Enhanced Music CD. The first commercially available Audio CD player, the Sony
Sony
CDP-101, was released October 1982 in Japan. Standard CDs have a diameter of 120 millimetres (4.7 in) and can hold up to about 80 minutes of uncompressed audio or about 700  MiB of data
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Republic Of Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen)), also known as the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
(Poblacht na hÉireann), is a sovereign state in north-western Europe
Europe
occupying 26 of 32 counties of the island of Ireland. The capital and largest city is Dublin, which is located on the eastern part of the island, and whose metropolitan area is home to around a third of the country's 4.75 million inhabitants. The state shares its only land border with Northern Ireland, a part of the United Kingdom. It is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the Celtic Sea to the south, Saint George's Channel
Saint George's Channel
to the south-east, and the Irish Sea to the east
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Television Advertising
An advertisement film (variously called a television commercial, commercial or ad in American English, and known in British English
British English
as a TV advert or simply an advert) is a span of television programming produced and paid for by an organization, which conveys a message, typically to market a product or service. Advertisers
Advertisers
and marketeers may refer to television commercials as TVCs.[1] Advertising
Advertising
revenue provides a significant portion of the funding for most privately owned television networks
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Jukebox
A jukebox is a partially automated music-playing device, usually a coin-operated machine, that will play a patron's selection from self-contained media. The classic jukebox has buttons with letters and numbers on them that, when entered in combination, are used to play a specific selection.Contents1 History 2 Notable models 3 Decline 4 Digital jukebox4.1 Jukebox
Jukebox
apps5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Coin-operated music boxes and player pianos were the first forms of automated coin-operated musical devices. These instruments used paper rolls, metal disks, or metal cylinders to play a musical selection on the instrument, or instruments, enclosed within the device. In the 1890s these devices were joined by machines which used actual recordings instead of physical instruments.[2][3] In 1890, Louis Glass and William S
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