HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Pustular Psoriasis
The term pustular psoriasis is used for a heterogeneous group of diseases that share pustular skin characteristics.[1]Pustular PsoriasisSevere pustular psoriasis.Classification and external resourcesICD-10 L40.1ICD-9-CM 696.1[edit on Wikidata]Classification[edit] Pustular psoriasis
Pustular psoriasis
is classified into two major forms: localized and generalized pustular psoriasis.[1] Within these two categories there are several variants:Classification of Localized and Generalized Pustular PsoriasisLocalized pustular psoriasisPalmoplantar pustulosis (acute and chronic) Acrodermatitis continua (of Hallopeau)Generalized pustular psoriasis(von Zumbusch) acute generalized pustular psoriasis Acute generalized pustular psoriasis of pregnancy (impetigo herpetiformis) Infantile and juvenile Subacute circinate and annularSigns and Symptoms[edit] Characteristics may vary according to the subtype of pustular psoriasis
[...More...]

"Pustular Psoriasis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

International Statistical Classification Of Diseases And Related Health Problems
The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is the international "standard diagnostic tool for epidemiology, health management and clinical purposes". Its full official name is International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems.[1] The ICD is maintained by the World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO), the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations System.[2] The ICD is designed as a health care classification system, providing a system of diagnostic codes for classifying diseases, including nuanced classifications of a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or disease. This system is designed to map health conditions to corresponding generic categories together with specific variations, assigning for these a designated code, up to six characters long
[...More...]

"International Statistical Classification Of Diseases And Related Health Problems" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Myalgia
Myalgia, or muscle pain, is a symptom of many diseases and disorders. The most common causes are the overuse or over-stretching of a muscle or group of muscles. Myalgia without a traumatic history is often due to viral infections. Longer-term myalgias may be indicative of a metabolic myopathy, some nutritional deficiencies or chronic fatigue syndrome.Contents1 Causes1.1 Overuse 1.2 Injury 1.3 Autoimmune 1.4 Metabolic defect 1.5 Other 1.6 Withdrawal syndrome from certain drugs2 Treatment 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksCauses[edit] The most common causes of myalgia are overuse, injury or strain. However, myalgia can also be caused by diseases, disorders, medications, or as a response to a vaccination
[...More...]

"Myalgia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

PubMed Central
PubMed
PubMed
Central (PMC) is a free digital repository that archives publicly accessible full-text scholarly articles that have been published within the biomedical and life sciences journal literature. As one of the major research databases within the suite of resources that have been developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), PubMed
PubMed
Central is much more than just a document repository
[...More...]

"PubMed Central" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

PubMed Identifier
PubMed
PubMed
is a free search engine accessing primarily the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. The United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM) at the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
maintains the database as part of the Entrez
Entrez
system of information retrieval. From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries
[...More...]

"PubMed Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
[...More...]

"International Standard Serial Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Annular Pustular Psoriasis
Annular pustular psoriasis is a rare variant of pustular psoriasis, having an annular, or circinate, lesion morphology that may appear at the onset of pustular psoriasis, with a tendency to spread and form enlarged rings.[1]:411[2] See also[edit]Psoriasis List of cutaneous conditionsReferences[edit]^ Freedberg, et al. (2003). Fitzpatrick's Dermatology
Dermatology
in General Medicine. (6th ed.). McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-138076-0. ^ Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L. (2007). Dermatology: 2-Volume Set. St
[...More...]

"Annular Pustular Psoriasis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Leukocytosis
Leukocytosis
Leukocytosis
is white cells (the leukocyte count) above the normal range in the blood.[1][2] It is frequently a sign of an inflammatory response,[3] most commonly the result of infection, but may also occur following certain parasitic infections or bone tumors as well as leukemia. It may also occur after strenuous exercise, convulsions such as epilepsy, emotional stress, pregnancy and labor, anesthesia, and epinephrine administration.[1] There are five principle types of leukocytosis:[4] Neutrophilia
Neutrophilia
(the most common form)[5] Lymphocytosis Monocytosis Eosinophilia BasophiliaThis increase in leukocyte (primarily neutrophils) is usually accompanied by a "left upper shift" in the ratio of immature to mature neutrophils and macrophages
[...More...]

"Leukocytosis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Nausea
Nausea is a sensation of unease and discomfort in the upper stomach with an involuntary urge to vomit.[1] It may precede vomiting, but a person can have nausea without vomiting. When prolonged, it is a debilitating symptom.[2] Nausea is a non-specific symptom, which means that it has many possible causes. Some common causes of nausea are motion sickness, dizziness, migraine, fainting, low blood sugar, gastroenteritis (stomach infection) or food poisoning. Nausea is a side effect of many medications including chemotherapy, or morning sickness in early pregnancy. Nausea may also be caused by anxiety, disgust and depression.[3][4][5] Medications taken to prevent and treat nausea are called antiemetics. The most commonly prescribed antiemetics in the US are promethazine, metoclopramide and ondansetron
[...More...]

"Nausea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fever
Fever, also known as pyrexia and febrile response,[6] is defined as having a temperature above the normal range due to an increase in the body's temperature set-point.[4][5] There is not a single agreed-upon upper limit for normal temperature with sources using values between 37.5 and 38.3 °C (99.5 and 100.9 °F).[6][7] The increase in set-point triggers increased muscle contractions and causes a feeling of cold.[1] This results in greater heat production and efforts to conserve heat.[2] When the set-point temperature returns to normal, a person feels hot, becomes flushed, and may begin to sweat.[2] Rarely a fever may trigger a febrile seizure.[3] This is more common in young children.[3] Fevers do not typically go higher than 41 to 42 °C (105.8 to 107.6 °F).[5] A fever can be caused by many medical conditions ranging from non serious to life threatening.[11] This includes viral, bacterial and parasitic infections such as the common cold, urinary tract infections
[...More...]

"Fever" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ICD-10
ICD-10 is the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD), a medical classification list by the World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO). It contains codes for diseases, signs and symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or diseases.[1] Work on ICD-10 began in 1983 and was completed in 1992.[1] The code set in the base classification allows for more than 14,400 different codes,[citation needed] and permits the tracking of many new diagnoses compared to ICD-9)
[...More...]

"ICD-10" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pustules
A cutaneous condition is any medical condition that affects the integumentary system—the organ system that encloses the body and includes skin, hair, nails, and related muscle and glands.[1] The major function of this system is as a barrier against the external environment.[2] Conditions of the human integumentary system constitute a broad spectrum of diseases, also known as dermatoses, as well as many nonpathologic states (like, in certain circumstances, melanonychia and racquet nails).[3][4] While only a small number of skin diseases account for most visits to the physician, thousands of skin conditions have been described.[5] Classification of these conditions often presents many nosological challenges, since underlying causes and pathogenetics are often not known.[6][7] Therefore, most current textbooks present a classification based on location (for example, conditions of the mucous membrane), morphology (chronic blistering conditions), cause (skin conditions resulting from phys
[...More...]

"Pustules" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Impetigo Herpetiformis
Impetigo herpetiformis is a form of severe pustular psoriasis occurring in pregnancy[1][2] which may occur during any trimester.[3][4] It is the only well known pustular psoriasis which is treated with steroids. See also[edit]Dermatoses of pregnancy List of cutaneous conditionsNotes[edit]^ James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. (10th ed.). Saunders. Page 471. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. ^ Tunzi M, Gray GR (January 2007). "Common skin conditions during pregnancy". Am Fam Physician. 75 (2): 211–8. PMID 17263216.  ^ http://www3.dermis.net/dermisroot/en/29476/diagnose.htm ^ Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L. (2007). Dermatology: 2-Volume Set. St. Louis: Mosby. ISBN 1-4160-2999-0. References[edit]Yap FBB (4 June 2008). "Impetigo herpetiformis: A case report and review of literature". Egyptian Dermatology Online Journal. 1 (4). ISSN 1687-3831
[...More...]

"Impetigo Herpetiformis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

(von Zumbusch) Acute Generalized Pustular Psoriasis
von Zumbusch (acute) generalized pustular psoriasis, (acute GPP) is the most severe form of generalized pustular psoriasis, and can be associated with life-threatening complications.[1]Contents1 Signs and symptoms 2 Diagnosis 3 Treatment 4 History 5 ReferencesSigns and symptoms[edit] Patients with acute GPP experience the eruption of multiple isolated sterile pustules generalized over the body, recurrent fevers, fatigue, and laboratory abnormalities (elevated ESR, elevated CRP, combined with leukocytosis).[2] Diagnosis[edit] Kogoj's spongiform pustules can be observed via histopathology to confirm acute GPP.[2] Treatment[edit] Acute GPP typically requires inpatient management including both topical and systemic therapy, and supportive measures.[3] Systemic glucocorticoid withdrawal is a common causative agent.[4] Withdrawal or administration of certain drugs in the patient's previous medication regimen may be required
[...More...]

"(von Zumbusch) Acute Generalized Pustular Psoriasis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.