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Pustular Psoriasis
The term PUSTULAR PSORIASIS is used for a heterogeneous group of diseases that share pustular skin characteristics. PUSTULAR PSORIASIS Severe pustular psoriasis. CLASSIFICATION AND EXTERNAL RESOURCES ICD -10 L40.1 ICD -9-CM 696.1CLASSIFICATION Pustular psoriasis
Pustular psoriasis
is classified into two major forms: localized and generalized pustular psoriasis . Within these two categories there are several variants: CLASSIFICATION OF LOCALIZED AND GENERALIZED PUSTULAR PSORIASIS LOCALIZED PUSTULAR PSORIASIS * Palmoplantar pustulosis (acute and chronic) * Acrodermatitis continua (of Hallopeau) GENERALIZED PUSTULAR PSORIASIS * (von Zumbusch) acute generalized pustular psoriasis * Acute generalized pustular psoriasis of pregnancy (impetigo herpetiformis ) * Infantile and juvenile * Subacute circinate and annularSIGNS AND SYMPTOMSCharacteristics may vary according to the subtype of pustular psoriasis. For example, it can be localized, commonly to the hands and feet (localized pustular psoriasis ), or generalized with widespread patches occurring randomly on any part of the body (generalized pustular psoriasis ). However, all forms of pustular psoriasis share in common the presence of red and tender blotchy skin covered with pustules
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International Statistical Classification Of Diseases And Related Health Problems
CLASSIFICATION is a general process related to categorization , the process in which ideas and objects are recognized, differentiated, and understood. A CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM is an approach to accomplishing classification
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ICD-10
ICD-10 is the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD), a medical classification list by the World Health Organization (WHO). It contains codes for diseases, signs and symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or diseases. The code set allows more than 14,400 different codes and permits the tracking of many new diagnoses . The codes can be expanded to over 16,000 codes by using optional sub-classifications. The WHO provides detailed information about ICD online, and makes available a set of materials online, such as an ICD-10 online browser, ICD-10 Training, ICD-10 online training, ICD-10 online training support, and study guide materials for download. The International version of ICD should not be confused with national modifications of ICD that frequently include much more detail, and sometimes have separate sections for procedures . The US ICD-10 Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM), for instance, has some 93,000 codes. The US also has the ICD-10 Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS), a coding system that contains 76,000 procedure codes that is not used by other countries. Work on ICD-10 began in 1983 and was completed in 1992
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List Of ICD-9 Codes
The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems
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Generalized Pustular Psoriasis
GENERALIZED PUSTULAR PSORIASIS (GPP) is an extremely rare type of psoriasis that can present in a variety of forms. Unlike the most general and common forms of psoriasis, GPP usually covers the entire body and with pus-filled blisters rather than plaques. GPP can present at any age, but is rarer in young children. It can appear with or without previous psoriasis conditions or history, and can reoccur in periodic episodes. CONTENTS * 1 Signs and Symptoms * 2 Severity * 3 Classification * 3.1 von Zumbusch acute generalized pustular psoriasis * 3.2 Generalized pustular psoriasis of pregnancy (Impetigo herpetiformis) * 3.3 Infantile and juvenile * 3.4 Circinate and annular * 4 Causes * 5 Treatments * 6 Case Reports * 6.1 Case Report 1 * 6.2 Case Report 2 * 6.3 Case Report 3 * 6.4 Case Report 4 * 6.5 Case Report 5 * 7 See also * 8 References SIGNS AND SYMPTOMSGPP presents as pustules and plaques over a wide area of the body. It differs from the localized form of pustular psoriasis in that patients are often febrile and systemically ill. However, the most prominent symptom, as described in the Archives of Dermatology, is “sheeted, pinhead-sized, sterile, sub-corneal pustules”. The IPC roundtable adds that these pustules often occur either at the edges “of expanding, intensely inflammatory plaques” or “within erythrodermic skin.” SEVERITYGPP is a rare and severe type of psoriasis
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Localized Pustular Psoriasis
LOCALIZED PUSTULAR PSORIASIS presents as two distinct conditions that must be considered separate from generalized psoriasis , and without systemic symptoms, these two distinct varieties being pustulosis palmaris et plantaris and acrodermatitis continua . :411 SEE ALSO * Psoriasis * Skin lesion
Skin lesion
REFERENCES * ^ Freedberg, et al. (2003). Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. (6th ed.). McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-138076-0 . This cutaneous condition article is a stub . You can help by expanding it
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Pustulosis Palmaris Et Plantaris
PUSTULOSIS PALMARIS ET PLANTARIS (also known as PUSTULOSIS OF PALMS AND SOLES, PALMOPLANTAR PUSTULOSIS, PERSISTENT PALMOPLANTAR PUSTULOSIS, PUSTULAR PSORIASIS OF THE BARBER TYPE, and PUSTULAR PSORIASIS OF THE EXTREMITIES) is a chronic recurrent pustular dermatosis (that is, a pustulosis or pustular psoriasis ) localized on the palms and soles only, characterized histologically by intraepidermal pustules filled with neutrophils . :411,628 :204 It can occur as part of the SAPHO syndrome . SEE ALSO * List of cutaneous conditions REFERENCES * ^ Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L. (2007). Dermatology: 2-Volume Set. St. Louis: Mosby. ISBN 1-4160-2999-0 . * ^ Freedberg, et al. (2003). Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. (6th ed.). McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-138076-0 . * ^ James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. (10th ed.). Saunders
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Acrodermatitis Continua
DERMATITIS REPENS (also known as "Acrodermatitis continua," :1026 "Acrodermatitis perstans," "Pustular acrodermatitis," "Acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau," "Acrodermatitis continua suppurativa Hallopeau," "Hallopeau's acrodermatitis,", "Hallopeau's acrodermatitis continua," and " Dermatitis repens Crocker") is a rare, sterile, pustular eruption of the fingers and toes that slowly extends proximally. :1026 :631 :195 SEE ALSO * Psoriasis * Skin lesion
Skin lesion
* List of cutaneous conditions
List of cutaneous conditions
* François Henri Hallopeau
François Henri Hallopeau
REFERENCES * ^ A B C Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L. (2007). Dermatology: 2-Volume Set. St. Louis: Mosby. ISBN 1-4160-2999-0 . * ^ Freedberg, et al. (2003). Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. (6th ed.). McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-138076-0 . * ^ James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. (10th ed.). Saunders. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0 . This cutaneous condition article is a stub . You can help by expanding it . * v * t * e Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Dermatitis_repens additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc
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(von Zumbusch) Acute Generalized Pustular Psoriasis
VON ZUMBUSCH (ACUTE) GENERALIZED PUSTULAR PSORIASIS, (ACUTE GPP) is the most severe form of generalized pustular psoriasis , and can be associated with life-threatening complications. CONTENTS * 1 Characteristics * 2 Diagnosis * 3 Treatment * 4 History * 5 References CHARACTERISTICSPatients with acute GPP experience the eruption of multiple isolated sterile pustules generalized over the body, recurrent fevers, fatigue, and laboratory abnormalities (elevated ESR , elevated CRP , combined with leukocytosis). DIAGNOSISKogoj's spongiform pustules can be observed via histopathology to confirm acute GPP. TREATMENTAcute GPP typically requires inpatient management including both topical and systemic therapy, and supportive measures. Systemic glucocorticoid withdrawal is a common causative agent. Withdrawal or administration of certain drugs in the patient's previous medication regimen may be required. Oral retinoids are the most effective treatment, and are considered first line. Cyclosporine or infliximab may be required for particularly acute cases. HISTORYThe disorder has been named after Leo Ritter von Zombusch, who first described two cases of a brother and a sister in 1910. The patients experienced patterns of redness and pustule formation over several years, often associated with use of topical medications. Unfortunately one of the two siblings died from complications of the disease
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Impetigo Herpetiformis
IMPETIGO HERPETIFORMIS is a form of severe pustular psoriasis occurring in pregnancy which may occur during any trimester. It is the only well known pustular psoriasis which is treated with steroids . SEE ALSO * Dermatoses of pregnancy * List of cutaneous conditions
List of cutaneous conditions
NOTES * ^ James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. (10th ed.). Saunders. Page 471. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0 . * ^ Tunzi M, Gray GR (January 2007). "Common skin conditions during pregnancy". Am Fam Physician. 75 (2): 211–8. PMID 17263216 . * ^ http://www3.dermis.net/dermisroot/en/29476/diagnose.htm * ^ Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L. (2007). Dermatology: 2-Volume Set. St. Louis: Mosby. ISBN 1-4160-2999-0 . REFERENCES * Yap FBB (4 June 2008). "Impetigo herpetiformis: A case report and review of literature". Egyptian Dermatology Online Journal. 1 (4). ISSN 1687-3831 . Retrieved 2009-07-09
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Pustules
A CUTANEOUS CONDITION is any medical condition that affects the integumentary system —the organ system that encloses the body and includes skin , hair , nails , and related muscle and glands . The major function of this system is as a barrier against the external environment. Conditions of the human integumentary system constitute a broad spectrum of diseases, also known as dermatoses, as well as many nonpathologic states (like, in certain circumstances, melanonychia and racquet nails ). While only a small number of skin diseases account for most visits to the physician, thousands of skin conditions have been described. Classification of these conditions often presents many nosological challenges, since underlying causes and pathogenetics are often not known. Therefore, most current textbooks present a classification based on location (for example, conditions of the mucous membrane ), morphology (chronic blistering conditions ), cause (skin conditions resulting from physical factors ), and so on. Clinically, the diagnosis of any particular skin condition is made by gathering pertinent information regarding the presenting skin lesion(s), including the location (such as arms, head, legs), symptoms (pruritus , pain), duration (acute or chronic), arrangement (solitary, generalized, annular, linear), morphology (macules, papules , vesicles ), and color (red, blue, brown, black, white, yellow)
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Fever
FEVER, also known as PYREXIA and FEBRILE RESPONSE, is defined as having a temperature above the normal range due to an increase in the body's temperature set-point . There is not a single agreed-upon upper limit for normal temperature with sources using values between 37.5 and 38.3 °C (99.5 and 100.9 °F). The increase in set-point triggers increased muscle contractions and causes a feeling of cold . This results in greater heat production and efforts to conserve heat. When the set-point temperature returns to normal, a person feels hot, becomes flushed , and may begin to sweat . Rarely a fever may trigger a febrile seizure . This is more common in young children. Fevers do not typically go higher than 41 to 42 °C (105.8 to 107.6 °F). A fever can be caused by many medical conditions ranging from not serious to potentially serious. This includes viral , bacterial and parasitic infections such as the common cold , urinary tract infections , meningitis , malaria and appendicitis among others. Non-infectious causes include vasculitis , deep vein thrombosis , side effects of medication, and cancer among others. It differs from hyperthermia , in that hyperthermia is an increase in body temperature over the temperature set-point, due to either too much heat production or not enough heat loss . Treatment to reduce fever is generally not required. Treatment of associated pain and inflammation, however, may be useful and help a person rest
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Myalgia
MYALGIA, or muscle pain , is a symptom of many diseases and disorders. The most common causes are the overuse or over-stretching of a muscle or group of muscles. Myalgia without a traumatic history is often due to viral infections . Longer-term myalgias may be indicative of a metabolic myopathy , some nutritional deficiencies or chronic fatigue syndrome . CONTENTS* 1 Causes * 1.1 Overuse * 1.2 Injury * 1.3 Autoimmune * 1.4 Metabolic defect * 1.5 Other * 1.6 Withdrawal syndrome from certain drugs * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links CAUSESThe most common causes of myalgia are overuse, injury or strain . However, myalgia can also be caused by diseases, disorders, medications, or as a response to a vaccination . It is also a sign of acute rejection after heart transplant surgery
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Nausea
NAUSEA is a sensation of unease and discomfort in the upper stomach with an involuntary urge to vomit . It may precede vomiting, but a person can have nausea without vomiting. When prolonged, it is a debilitating symptom. Nausea is a non-specific symptom , which means that it has many possible causes. Some common causes of nausea are motion sickness , dizziness , migraine , fainting , low blood sugar , gastroenteritis (stomach infection) or food poisoning . Nausea is a side effect of many medications including chemotherapy, or morning sickness in early pregnancy. Nausea may also be caused by anxiety , disgust and depression . Medications taken to prevent and treat nausea are called antiemetics . The most commonly prescribed antiemetics in the US are promethazine , metoclopramide and ondansetron . The word nausea is from Latin nausea, from Greek ναυσία – nausia, "ναυτία" – nautia, motion sickness ", "feeling sick or queasy"
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Leukocytosis
LEUKOCYTOSIS is white cells (the leukocyte count) above the normal range in the blood . It is frequently a sign of an inflammatory response , most commonly the result of infection , but may also occur following certain parasitic infections or bone tumors as well as leukemia. It may also occur after strenuous exercise, convulsions such as epilepsy, emotional stress, pregnancy and labor, anesthesia, and epinephrine administration. There are five principle types of leukocytosis: * Neutrophilia (the most common form) * Lymphocytosis * Monocytosis * Eosinophilia
Eosinophilia
* Basophilia This increase in leukocyte (primarily neutrophils) is usually accompanied by a "LEFT UPPER SHIFT" in the ratio of immature to mature neutrophils and macrophages. The proportion of immature leukocytes decreases due to proliferation and inhibition of granulocyte and monocyte precursors in the bone marrow which is stimulated by several products of inflammation including C3a and G-CSF. Although it may indicate illness, leukocytosis is considered a laboratory finding instead of a separate disease . This classification is similar to that of fever , which is also a test result instead of a disease
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Annular Pustular Psoriasis
ANNULAR PUSTULAR PSORIASIS is a rare variant of pustular psoriasis, having an annular, or circinate, lesion morphology that may appear at the onset of pustular psoriasis, wit