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Puss In Boots
"Master Cat, or The Booted Cat" (Italian: Il gatto con gli stivali; French: Le Maître chat ou le Chat botté), commonly known in English as "Puss in Boots", is a European literary fairy tale about a cat who uses trickery and deceit to gain power, wealth, and the hand of a princess in marriage for his penniless and low-born master. The oldest telling is by Italian author Giovanni Francesco Straparola, who included it in his The Facetious Nights of Straparola
The Facetious Nights of Straparola
(c. 1550–53) in XIV–XV
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Élisabeth Charlotte D'Orléans
Élisabeth Charlotte d'Orléans
Élisabeth Charlotte d'Orléans
(13 September 1676 – 23 December 1744) was a French petite-fille de France, and duchess of Lorraine and Bar by marriage to Leopold, Duke of Lorraine. She was regent of Lorraine and Bar during the minority (1729–1730) and absence of her son (1730–1737), and suo jure Princess of Commercy
Commercy
in 1737–1744. Among her children was Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor, a co-founder of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine.Contents1 Life1.1 Early life 1.2 Marriage 1.3 Duchess of Lorraine 1.4 Regent
Regent
of Lorraine 1.5 Princess of Commercy2 Legacy 3 Issue 4 Ancestors 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Early life[edit] Élisabeth Charlotte was born at the Château de Saint-Cloud
Château de Saint-Cloud
outside Paris
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Brahmin
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Lion
P. l. atrox P. l. europaea P. l. melanochaita (Sensu stricto) P. l. sinhaleyus P. l. spelaea P. l. vereshchaginiDistribution of Panthera
Panthera
leo in Africa
Africa
and Eurasia, in the past and present.Synonyms Felis
Felis
leo Linnaeus, 1758The lion ( Panthera
Panthera
leo) is a species in the family Felidae
Felidae
and a member of the genus Panthera. It is the second largest extant species after the tiger. It exhibits a pronounced sexual dimorphism; males are larger than females with a typical weight range of 150 to 250 kg (331 to 551 lb) for the former and 120 to 182 kg (265 to 401 lb) for the latter
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Mouse
A mouse (Mus), plural mice is a small rodent characteristically having a pointed snout, small rounded ears, a body-length scaly tail and a high breeding rate. The best known mouse species is the common house mouse (Mus musculus). It is also a popular pet. In some places, certain kinds of field mice are locally common. They are known to invade homes for food and shelter. Domestic mice sold as pets often differ substantially in size from the common house mouse. This is attributable both to breeding and to different conditions in the wild
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Moral
A moral (from Latin
Latin
morālis) is a message that is conveyed or a lesson to be learned from a story or event. The moral may be left to the hearer, reader, or viewer to determine for themselves, or may be explicitly encapsulated in a maxim. A moral is a lesson in a story or in real life.Contents1 Finding morals 2 Arts 3 In moral tales 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksFinding morals[edit] As an example of an explicit maxim, at the end of Aesop's fable of the Tortoise and the Hare, in which the plodding and determined tortoise won a race against the much-faster yet extremely arrogant hare, the stated moral is "slow and steady wins the race"
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Carlo Collodi
Carlo Lorenzini, better known by the pen name Carlo Collodi
Carlo Collodi
(Italian pronunciation: [ˈkarlo kolˈlɔːdi]; 24 November 1826 – 26 October 1890), was an Italian author and journalist,[1] widely known for his world-renowned fairy tale novel The Adventures of Pinocchio.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Death 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Collodi was born in Florence
Florence
on 24 November 1826. He spent most of his childhood in the town of Collodi where his mother was born. His mother was a farmer's daughter and his father was a cook. He had 10 siblings but seven died at a young age. Career[edit] During the Italian wars of Independence in 1848 and 1860 Collodi served as a volunteer with the Tuscan army
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Trickster
In mythology, and in the study of folklore and religion, a trickster is a character in a story (god, goddess, spirit, man, woman, or anthropomorphisation), which exhibits a great degree of intellect or secret knowledge, and uses it to play tricks or otherwise disobey normal rules and conventional behaviour.Contents1 Mythology 2 Archetype 3 Role in African American literature 4 In Native American tradition4.1 Coyote5 In Internet and multimedia studies 6 In oral stories 7 See also 8 References 9 Sources 10 External linksMythology[edit] Tricksters are archetypal characters who appear in the myths of many different cultures. Lewis Hyde
Lewis Hyde
describes the trickster as a "boundary-crosser".[1] The trickster crosses and often breaks both physical and societal rules
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Somadeva
The Kathāsaritsāgara ("Ocean of the Streams of Stories") is a famous 11th-century collection of Indian legends, fairy tales and folk tales as retold in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
by a Shaiva named Somadeva. Kathasaritsagara
Kathasaritsagara
is said to have been adopted from Guṇāḍhya's Brihatkatha, which was written in a poorly-understood language known as Paiśācī. The work is no longer extant but several later adaptations — the Kathasaritsagara, Brihatkathamanjari and Bṛhatkathāślokasaṃgraha. However, none of these recensions necessarily derives directly from Gunadhya, each may have an intermediate versions. Scholars compare Guṇāḍhya
Guṇāḍhya
with Vyasa
Vyasa
and Valmiki
Valmiki
even though he did not write the now long-lost Brihatkatha
Brihatkatha
in Sanskrit
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Kashmir
Kashmir
Kashmir
is the northernmost geographical region of the Indian subcontinent. Until the mid-19th century, the term "Kashmir" denoted only the Kashmir Valley
Kashmir Valley
between the Great Himalayas and the Pir Panjal Range
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India
India, officially the Republic
Republic
of India
India
(IAST: Bhārat Gaṇarājya),[e] is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country (with over 1.2 billion people), and the most populous democracy in the world. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
on the southeast. It shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[f] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the northeast; and Myanmar
Myanmar
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India
India
is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and the Maldives
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Monarch
A monarch is a sovereign head of state in a monarchy.[1][2] A monarch may exercise the highest authority and power in the state, or others may wield that power on behalf of the monarch. Typically a monarch either personally inherits the lawful right to exercise the state's sovereign rights (often referred to as the throne or the crown) or is selected by an established process from a family or cohort eligible to provide the nation's monarch. Alternatively, an individual may become monarch by conquest, acclamation or a combination of means
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Folklore
Folklore
Folklore
is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or group. These include oral traditions such as tales, proverbs and jokes. They include material culture, ranging from traditional building styles to handmade toys common to the group. Folklore
Folklore
also includes customary lore, the forms and rituals of celebrations such as Christmas
Christmas
and weddings, folk dances and initiation rites. Each one of these, either singly or in combination, is considered a folklore artifact. Just as essential as the form, folklore also encompasses the transmission of these artifacts from one region to another or from one generation to the next
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Katha Sarit Sagara
The Kathāsaritsāgara ("Ocean of the Streams of Stories") is a famous 11th-century collection of Indian legends, fairy tales and folk tales as retold in Sanskrit by a Shaiva named Somadeva. Kathasaritsagara is said to have been adopted from Guṇāḍhya's Brihatkatha, which was written in a poorly-understood language known as Paiśācī. The work is no longer extant but several later adaptations — the Kathasaritsagara, Brihatkathamanjari and Bṛhatkathāślokasaṃgraha. However, none of these recensions necessarily derives directly from Gunadhya, each may have an intermediate versions. Scholars compare Guṇāḍhya with Vyasa and Valmiki even though he did not write the now long-lost Brihatkatha in Sanskrit
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Panchatantra
The Panchatantra
Panchatantra
(IAST: Pañcatantra, Sanskrit: पञ्चतन्त्र, "Five Treatises") is an ancient Indian work of political philosophy, in the form of a collection of interrelated animal fables in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
verse and prose, arranged within a frame story.[2] The surviving work is dated to about 300 BCE, but the fables are likely much more ancient.[3][4] The text's author is unknown, but has been attributed to Vishnu Sharma
Vishnu Sharma
in some recensions and Vasubhaga in others, both of which may be fictitious pen names.[3] It is likely a Hindu text,[3][5] and based on older oral traditions with "animal fables that are as old as we are able to imagine".[6] It is "certainly the most frequently translated literary product of India",[7] and these stories are among the most widely known in the world.[8] It goes by many names in many cultures
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Hindu
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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