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Puritans
The Puritans
Puritans
were English Reformed
Reformed

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Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
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Independent (religion)
In English church history, Independents advocated local congregational control of religious and church matters, without any wider geographical hierarchy, either ecclesiastical or political. Independents reached particular prominence between 1642 and 1660, in the period of the English Civil War
English Civil War
and of the Commonwealth and Protectorate, wherein the Parliamentary Army became the champion of Independent religious views against the Anglicanism
Anglicanism
or the Catholicism of Royalists and the Presbyterianism
Presbyterianism
favoured by Parliament itself. The Independents advocated freedom of religion for non-Catholics.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit] During the First Civil War, the Parliamentary cause was supported by an alliance of Anglicans who supported Parliamentary traditions, Presbyterians and Independents
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Catholic Church
GodTrinity Pater Filius Spiritus Sanctus Consubstantialitas Filioque Divinum illud munusDivine Law Decalogus Ex Cathedra DeificatioRealms beyond the States of the Church Heaven Purgatory Limbo HellMysterium Fidei Passion of Jesus Crucifixion
Crucifixion
of Jesus Harrowing of Hell Resurrection AscensionBeatæ Mariæ Semper Virginis Mariology Veneration Immaculate Conception Mater Dei Perpetual virginity Assumption TitlesOther teachings Josephology Morality Body Lectures Sexuality Apologetics Divine grace Salvation Original sin Saints DogmaTexts Biblia Sacra S
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Restoration (England)
The Restoration of the English monarchy
English monarchy
took place in the Stuart period. It began in 1660 when the English, Scottish and Irish monarchies were all restored under King Charles II
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Church Of Scotland
The Church of Scotland
Scotland
(Scots: The Scots Kirk, Scottish Gaelic: Eaglais na h-Alba), known informally by its Scots language
Scots language
name, the Kirk, is the national church of Scotland.[4] Protestant
Protestant
and Presbyterian, its longstanding decision to respect "liberty of opinion in points which do not enter into the substance of the Faith"[5] means it is tolerant of a variety of theological positions, including those who would term themselves conservative and liberal in their doctrine, ethics and interpretation of Scripture. The Church of Scotland
Scotland
traces its roots back to the beginnings of Christianity in Scotland, but its identity is principally shaped by the Reformation of 1560
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Royal Prerogative
The royal prerogative is a body of customary authority, privilege, and immunity, recognized in common law and, sometimes, in civil law jurisdictions possessing a monarchy, as belonging to the sovereign alone.[1] It is the means by which some of the executive powers of government, possessed by and vested in a monarch with regard to the process of governance of the state, are carried out. In most Constitutional monarchies, individual prerogatives can be abolished by Parliament, although in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
the royal prerogative is devolved to the head of the gove
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Millennialism
— Events —Death Resurrection Last JudgementJewishMessianismBook of Daniel KabbalahTaoistLi HongZoroastrianFrashokereti SaoshyantInter-religiousEnd times Apocalypticism2012 phenomenonMillenarianism Last Judgment Resurrection
Resurrection
of the deadGog and Magog Messianic Agev t e Millennialism
Millennialism
(from millennium, Latin for "a thousand years"), or chiliasm (from the Greek equivalent), is a belief advanced by some Christian
Christian
denominations that a Golden Age
Golden Age
or Paradise
Paradise
will occur on Earth
Earth
in which " Christ
Christ
will reign" for 1000 years prior to the final judgment and future eternal state (the "World to Come" of the New Heavens and New Earth. This belief derives primarily from Revelation 20:1–6
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Episcopal Polity
An episcopal polity is a hierarchical form of church governance ("ecclesiastical polity") in which the chief local authorities are called bishops. (The word "bishop" derives, via the British Latin
British Latin
and Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
term *ebiscopus/*biscopus, from the Ancient Greek επίσκοπος epískopos meaning "overseer".) It is the structure used by many of the major Christian Churches and denominations, such as the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Church of the East, Anglican and Lutheran
Lutheran
churches or denominations, and other churches founded independently from these lineages. Churches with an episcopal polity are governed by bishops, practicing their authorities in the dioceses and conferences or synods
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Wales
Wales
Wales
(/ˈweɪlz/ ( listen); Welsh: Cymru [ˈkəmri] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the island of Great Britain.[8] It is bordered by England
England
to the east, the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon
Snowdon
(Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit
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Thomas Gouge
Thomas Gouge
Thomas Gouge
(19 September 1605, Bow, London
Bow, London
– 29 October 1681, London) was an English Presbyterian clergyman, a contemporary of Samuel Pepys, associated with the Puritan
Puritan
movement. Gouge was the son of William Gouge, himself a clergyman and the rector of St. Anne's church in Blackfriars. Thomas Gouge
Thomas Gouge
was educated at Eton and at King's College, Cambridge, where he became a fellow in 1628.[1][2] He was the vicar of the parish of St. Sepulchre from 1638, a position he held until the Act of Uniformity in 1662.[3] Gouge's refusal to use the 1662 version of the Book of Common Prayer
Book of Common Prayer
is recounted in the diary of Samuel Pepys.[4] Thomas Gouge
Thomas Gouge
was famous during his lifetime for acts of charity, especially in the aftermath of the Great Fire of London
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Netherlands
The Netherlands
Netherlands
(Dutch: Nederland, [ˈneːdərlɑnt] (listen)), informally Holland,[11] is a country in Northwestern Europe with some overseas territories in the Caribbean. In Europe, it consists of 12 provinces that border Germany
Germany
to the east, Belgium
Belgium
to the south, and the North Sea
North Sea
to the northwest, with maritime borders in the North Sea
North Sea
with those countries and the United Kingdom.[12] Together with three island territories in the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea—Bonaire, Sint Eustatius
Sint Eustatius
and Saba—it forms a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The official language is Dutch and a secondary official language in the province of Friesland
Friesland
is West Frisian
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Doctrine
Doctrine (from Latin: doctrina) is a codification of beliefs or a body of teachings or instructions, taught principles or positions, as the essence of teachings in a given branch of knowledge or belief system. The Greek analogue is the etymology of catechism.[1] Often doctrine specifically suggests a body of religious principles as it is promulgated by a church, but not necessarily; doctrine is also used to refer to a principle of law, in the common law traditions, established through a history of past decisions, such as the doctrine of self-defense, or the principle of fair use, or the more narrowly applicable first-sale doctrine
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Broadsheet
A broadsheet is the largest newspaper format and is characterized by long vertical pages (typically 22 inches or 56 centimetres). The term derives from types of popular prints usually just of a single sheet, sold on the streets and containing various types of material, from ballads to political satire. The first broadsheet newspaper was the Dutch Courante uyt Italien, Duytslandt, &c
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Roman Catholic
GodTrinity Father Son Holy Ghost Consubstantialitas Filioque Divinum illud munusDivine Law Decalogus Ex Cathedra DeificatioRealms beyond the States of the Church Heaven Purgatory Limbo HellPaschal mystery Passion of Jesus Crucifixion
Crucifixion
of Jesus Harrowing of Hell Resurrection AscensionBlessed Virgin Mary Mariology Veneration Immaculate Conception Mater Dei Perpetual virginity Assumption Dormition Titles Queen Apparition MediatrixOther teachings Josephology Morality Body Lectures Sexuality Apologetics Divine grace Salvation Original sin Saints DogmaT
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John Pym
John Pym
John Pym
(1584 – 8 December 1643) was an English parliamentarian, leader of the Long Parliament
Long Parliament
and a prominent critic of Kings James I and then Charles I. He was one of the Five Members whose attempted arrest by King Charles I in the House of Commons of England
England
in 1642 sparked the Civil War. In addition to this Pym went ahead and started to accuse William Laud
William Laud
(the king's adviser) of trying to convert England
England
back to Catholicism.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Political life 3 English Civil War 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Pym was born in Brymore, Cannington, Somerset,[1] into minor nobility. His father died when he was very young and his mother remarried, to Sir Anthony Rous
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