HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Puppet
A puppet is an object, often resembling a human, animal or mythical figure, that is animated or manipulated by a person called a puppeteer. The puppeteer uses movements of their hands, arms, or control devices such as rods or strings to move the body, head, limbs, and in some cases the mouth and eyes of the puppet. The puppeteer often speaks in the voice of the character of the puppet, and then synchronizes the movements of the puppet's mouth with this spoken part. The actions, gestures and spoken parts acted out by the puppeteer with the puppet are typically used in storytelling. Puppetry is a very ancient form of theatre which dates back to the 5th century BC in Ancient Greece. There are many different varieties of puppets, and they are made from a wide range of materials, depending on their form and intended use
[...More...]

"Puppet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Autograph
Autograph
Autograph
is a famous person's artistic signature. This term is used in particular for the practice of collecting autographs of celebrities
[...More...]

"Autograph" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shamisen
The shamisen or samisen (三味線), also sangen (三絃), both words mean "three strings", is a three-stringed traditional Japanese musical instrument derived from the Chinese instrument sanxian. It is played with a plectrum called a bachi. The Japanese pronunciation
Japanese pronunciation
is usually "shamisen" but sometimes "jamisen" when used as a suffix (e.g., Tsugaru-jamisen).[1] (In western Japan, and often in Edo-period sources, it is sometimes "samisen.") The construction of the shamisen varies in shape, depending on the genre in which it is used. The instrument used to accompany kabuki has a thin neck, facilitating the agile and virtuosic requirements of that genre
[...More...]

"Shamisen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

On The Motion Of Animals
[*]: Authenticity disputed strikethrough: Generally agreed to be spuriousv t e Movement of Animals (or On the Motion of Animals; Greek Περὶ ζῴων κινήσεως; Latin De Motu Animalium) is one of Aristotle's major texts on biology. It sets out the general principles of animal locomotion. Editions and translations[edit] Works related to On the Movement of Animals at Wikisource On the Motion of Animals, translated by A. S. L. Farquharson De Motu and De Incessu Animalium, translated by A. S. L. Farquharson (Internet Archive) Martha Nussbaum, Aristotle's De Motu Animalium. Princeton University Press, 1978 ISBN 0691020353.This article about a book on zoology or animals is a stub
[...More...]

"On The Motion Of Animals" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Silappadikaram
Silappadikaram (Tamil: சிலப்பதிகாரம், Cilappatikāram, IPA: [ʧiləppət̪ikɑːrəm] ?, republished as The Tale of an Anklet[1]) is one of The Five Great Epics of Tamil Literature according to later Tamil literary tradition.[2] A poet-prince from Kodungallur
Kodungallur
near Kochi
Kochi
(part of ancient Tamilakam, now in modern Kerala), referred to by the pseudonym Ilango Adigal, is credited with this work.[3] He is reputed to have been the brother of Vel Kelu Kuttuvan, the Chera dynasty
Chera dynasty
king.[4] As a literary work, Silappatikaram
Silappatikaram
is held in high regard by the Tamil people. It contains three chapters and a total of 5270 lines of poetry
[...More...]

"Silappadikaram" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Snow
Snow
Snow
refers to forms of ice crystals that precipitate from the atmosphere (usually from clouds) and undergo changes on the Earth's surface.[2] It pertains to frozen crystalline water throughout its life cycle, starting when, under suitable conditions, the ice crystals form in the atmosphere, increase to millimeter size, precipitate and accumulate on surfaces, then metamorphose in place, and ultimately melt, slide or sublimate away. Snowstorms
Snowstorms
organize and develop by feeding on sources of atmospheric moisture and cold air. Snowflakes nucleate around particles in the atmosphere by attracting supercooled water droplets, which freeze in hexagonal-shaped crystals. Snowflakes take on a variety of shapes, basic among these are platelets, needles, columns and rime. As snow accumulates into a snowpack, it may blow into drifts. Over time, accumulated snow metamorphoses, by sintering, sublimation and freeze-thaw
[...More...]

"Snow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ultraviolet Lighting
Ultraviolet
Ultraviolet
(UV) is an electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength from 100 nm to 400 nm, shorter than that of visible light but longer than X-rays. UV radiation is present in sunlight constituting about 10% of the total light output of the Sun. It is also produced by electric arcs and specialized lights, such as mercury-vapor lamps, tanning lamps, and black lights. Although long-wavelength ultraviolet is not considered an ionizing radiation because its photons lack the energy to ionize atoms, it can cause chemical reactions and causes many substances to glow or fluoresce. Consequently, the chemical and biological effects of UV are greater than simple heating effects, and many practical applications of UV radiation derive from its interactions with organic molecules. Suntan and sunburn are familiar effects of over-exposure of the skin to UV, along with higher risk of skin cancer
[...More...]

"Ultraviolet Lighting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Velvet
Velvet
Velvet
is a type of woven tufted fabric in which the cut threads are evenly distributed, with a short dense pile, giving it a distinctive soft feel. By extension, the word velvety means "smooth like velvet." Velvet
Velvet
can be made from either synthetic or natural fibers.Contents1 Construction and composition 2 History 3 Entry from Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
(1911) 4 Types4.1 Gallery5 Fibres 6 See also 7 ReferencesConstruction and composition[edit]Illustration depicting the manufacture of velvet fabric Velvet
Velvet
is woven on a special loom that weaves two thicknesses of the material at the same time. The two pieces are then cut apart to create the pile effect, and the two lengths of fabric are wound on separate take-up rolls
[...More...]

"Velvet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Torch
A torch is a stick with combustible material at one end, which is ignited and used as a light source.[1] Torches have been used throughout history, and are still used in processions, symbolic and religious events, and in juggling entertainment
[...More...]

"Torch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
[...More...]

"Japan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parades
A parade (also called march or marchpast) is a procession of people, usually organized along a street, often in costume, and often accompanied by marching bands, floats or sometimes large balloons. Parades are held for a wide range of reasons, but are usually celebrations of some kind. In Britain the term parade is usually reserved for either military parades or other occasions where participants march in formation; for celebratory occasions the word procession is more usual
[...More...]

"Parades" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Disney
The Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Company, commonly known as Disney (/ˈdɪzni/),[4] is an American diversified multinational mass media and entertainment conglomerate, headquartered at the Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Studios in Burbank, California. It is the world's second-largest media conglomerate in terms of revenue, after Comcast.[5] Disney was founded on October 16, 1923 – by brothers Walt Disney
Walt Disney
and Roy O. Disney
Roy O. Disney
– as the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio, and established itself as a leader in the American animation industry before diversifying into live-action film production, television, and theme parks. The company also operated under the names The Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Studio and then Walt Disney Productions
[...More...]

"Disney" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hugo Chávez
Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈuɣo ɾafaˈel ˈt͡ʃaβes ˈfɾi.as]; 28 July 1954 – 5 March 2013) was a Venezuelan politician who was President of Venezuela
President of Venezuela
from 1999 to 2013. Chávez was also leader of the Fifth Republic Movement
Fifth Republic Movement
political party from its foundation in 1997 until 2007, when it merged with several other parties to form the United Socialist Party of Venezuela
United Socialist Party of Venezuela
(PSUV), which he led until 2012. Born into a working-class family in Sabaneta, Barinas, Chávez became a career military officer, and after becoming dissatisfied with the Venezuelan political system based on the Puntofijo Pact,[1] he founded the clandestine Revolutionary Bolivarian Movement-200
Revolutionary Bolivarian Movement-200
(MBR-200) in the early 1980s
[...More...]

"Hugo Chávez" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

George Burns
George Burns
George Burns
(born Nathan Birnbaum; January 20, 1896 – March 9, 1996) was an American comedian, actor, singer, and writer. He was one of the few entertainers whose career successfully spanned vaudeville, radio, film and television. His arched eyebrow and cigar-smoke punctuation became familiar trademarks for over three quarters of a century. He and his wife, Gracie
Gracie
Allen, appeared on radio, television, and film as the comedy duo Burns and Allen. When Burns was 79, he had a sudden career revival as an amiable, beloved and unusually active comedy elder statesman in the 1975 film The Sunshine Boys, for which he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor
[...More...]

"George Burns" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.