HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ptah
In Egyptian mythology, Ptah
Ptah
(/pəˈtɑː/;[1] Ancient Egyptian: ptḥ, probably vocalized as Pitaḥ in ancient Egyptian)[2] is the demiurge of Memphis, god of craftsmen and architects. In the triad of Memphis, he is the spouse of Sekhmet
Sekhmet
and the father of Nefertum. He was also regarded as the father of the sage Imhotep.Contents1 Origin and symbolism 2 Representations and hypostases 3 Development of the cult 4 Main places of worship 5 Photographs 6 Legacy 7 See also 8 References 9 LiteratureOrigin and symbolism[edit]Statue of Ptah
Ptah
- Egyptian Museum
Egyptian Museum
of Turin Ptah
Ptah
is an Egyptian deity and considered the demiurge who existed before all other things and, by his will, thought the world into existence
[...More...]

"Ptah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Epithet
An epithet (from Greek: ἐπίθετον epitheton, neuter of ἐπίθετος epithetos, "attributed, added"[1]) is a byname, or a descriptive term (word or phrase), accompanying or occurring in place of a name and having entered common usage. It has various shades of meaning when applied to seemingly real or fictitious people, divinities, objects, and binomial nomenclature
[...More...]

"Epithet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shabaka
Neferkare Shabaka
Shabaka
(or Shabako) was the third Kushite
Kushite
pharaoh of the Twenty-fifth dynasty of Egypt, who reigned from 705–690 BC.[3]Contents1 Shabaka's timeline in the 25th dynasty 2 Family 3 Biography 4 Death 5 Image gallery 6 References 7 External linksShabaka's timeline in the 25th dynasty[edit] The archaeological evidence now in 2016/2017 firmly favours a Shebitku- Shabaka
Shabaka
succession
[...More...]

"Shabaka" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Old Kingdom Of Egypt
The Old Kingdom is the period in the third millennium (c. 2686–2181 BC) also known as the 'Age of the Pyramids' or 'Age of the Pyramid Builders' as it includes the great 4th Dynasty when King Sneferu
Sneferu
perfected the art of pyramid building and the pyramids of Giza were constructed under the kings Khufu, Khafre, and Menkaure.[1] Egypt attained its first continuous peak of civilization – the first of three so-called "Kingdom" periods (followed by the Middle Kingdom and New Kingdom) which mark the high points of civilization in the lower Nile
Nile
Valley. The term itself was coined by eighteenth-century historians and the distinction between the Old Kingdom and the Early Dynastic Period is not one which would have been recognized by Ancient Egyptians
[...More...]

"Old Kingdom Of Egypt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ptolemaic Dynasty
The Ptolemaic dynasty
Ptolemaic dynasty
(/ˌtɒləˈmeɪ.ɪk/; Ancient Greek: Πτολεμαῖοι, Ptolemaioi), sometimes also known as the Lagids (/ˈlædʒɪdz/) or Lagidae (/ˈlædʒɪˌdiː/; Λαγίδαι, Lagidai, after Lagus, Ptolemy I's father), was a Macedonian Greek[1][2][3][4][5] royal family, which ruled the Ptolemaic Kingdom in Egypt
Egypt
during the Hellenistic period. Their rule lasted for 275 years, from 305 to 30 BC.[6] They were the last dynasty of ancient Egypt. Ptolemy, one of the seven somatophylakes (bodyguards) who served as Alexander the Great's generals and deputies, was appointed satrap of Egypt
Egypt
after Alexander's death in 323 BC. In 305 BC, he declared himself Ptolemy I, later known as Sōter "Saviour". The Egyptians
Egyptians
soon accepted the Ptolemies as the successors to the pharaohs of independent Egypt
[...More...]

"Ptolemaic Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Late Period Of Ancient Egypt
The Late Period of ancient Egypt
Egypt
refers to the last flowering of native Egyptian rulers after the Third Intermediate Period
Third Intermediate Period
from the 26th Saite Dynasty into Achaemenid Persian conquests and ended with the conquest by Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
and establishment of the Ptolemaic Kingdom. It ran from 664 BC until 332 BC. With the Macedonian Greek conquest in the latter half of the 4th century BC, the age of Hellenistic Egypt
Egypt
began. Libyans and Persians alternated rule with native Egyptians, but traditional conventions continued in the arts.[1]Contents1 26th Dynasty 2 27th Dynasty 3 28th–30th Dynasties 4 31st Dynasty 5 References 6 Bibliography26th Dynasty[edit] The Twenty-Sixth Dynasty, also known as the Saite Dynasty after Sais, reigned from 672–525 BC, and consisted of six pharaohs
[...More...]

"Late Period Of Ancient Egypt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stucco
Stucco
Stucco
or render is a material made of aggregates, a binder and water. Stucco
Stucco
is applied wet and hardens to a very dense solid. It is used as a decorative coating for walls and ceilings, and as a sculptural and artistic material in architecture. Stucco
Stucco
may be used to cover less visually appealing construction materials, such as metal, concrete, cinder block, or clay brick and adobe. In English, stucco usually refers to a coating for the outside of a building and plaster one for interiors; as described below, the material itself is often little different
[...More...]

"Stucco" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carthage
Carthage
Carthage
(/ˈkɑːrθɪdʒ/, from Latin: Carthago; Phoenician: Qart-ḥadašt ("New city")) was the center or capital city of the ancient Carthaginian civilization, on the eastern side of the Lake of Tunis
Tunis
in what is now the Tunis Governorate
Tunis Governorate
in Tunisia. The city developed from a Phoenician colony into the capital of an empire dominating the Mediterranean during the first millennium BC.[1] The legendary Queen Dido
Dido
is regarded as the founder of the city, though her historicity has been questioned. According to accounts by Timaeus of Tauromenium, she purchased from a local tribe the amount of land that could be covered by an oxhide
[...More...]

"Carthage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Phoenicians
Coordinates: 34°07′25″N 35°39′04″E / 34.12361°N 35.65111°E / 34.12361; 35.65111Phoeniciaknʿn / kanaʿan  (Phoenician) Φοινίκη / Phoiníkē  (Greek)1500 BC[1]–539 BCMap of Phoenicia
Phoenicia
and its Mediterranean trade routesCapital Not specifiedLanguages Phoenician, PunicReligion Canaanite religionGovernment City-states ruled by kingsWell-known kings of Phoenician cities •  c. 1000 BC Ahiram •  969 – 936 BC Hiram I •  820 – 774 BC
[...More...]

"Phoenicians" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mediterranean
The Mediterranean Sea
Sea
is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin
Mediterranean Basin
and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe
Southern Europe
and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa
North Africa
and on the east by the Levant. Although the sea is sometimes considered a part of the Atlantic Ocean, it is usually identified as a separate body of water
[...More...]

"Mediterranean" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Late Period Of Egypt
Period may refer to:Era, a length or span of time Full stop
Full stop
(or period), a punctuation mark Menstruation, also called a "period"Contents1 Science and mathematics 2 Arts 3 Other uses 4 See alsoScience and mathematicsUnit of time Period (physics), the duration of time of one cycle in a repeating event Orbi
[...More...]

"Late Period Of Egypt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Syncretism
Syncretism
Syncretism
(/ˈsɪŋkrətɪzəm/) is the combining of different beliefs, while blending practices of various schools of thought. Syncretism
Syncretism
involves the merging or assimilation of several originally discrete traditions, especially in the theology and mythology of religion, thus asserting an underlying unity and allowing for an inclusive approach to other faiths
[...More...]

"Syncretism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Egyptian Hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
(/ˈhaɪrəˌɡlɪf, -roʊ-/[2][3]) were the formal writing system used in Ancient Egypt. It combined logographic, syllabic and alphabetic elements, with a total of some 1,000 distinct characters.[4][5] Cursive hieroglyphs
Cursive hieroglyphs
were used for religious literature on papyrus and wood. The later hieratic and demotic Egyptian scripts were derived from hieroglyphic writing; Meroitic was a late derivation from demotic. The use of hieroglyphic writing arose from proto-literate symbol systems in the Early Bronze Age, around the 32nd century BC (Naqada III),[1] with the first decipherable sentence written in the Egyptian language dating to the Second Dynasty
Second Dynasty
(28th century BC)
[...More...]

"Egyptian Hieroglyphs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Amarna Period
The Amarna
Amarna
Period was an era of Egyptian history during the later half of the Eighteenth Dynasty when the royal residence of the pharaoh and his queen was shifted to Akhetaten ('Horizon of the Aten') in what is now Amarna. It was marked by the reign of Amenhotep IV, who changed his name to Akhenaten
Akhenaten
(1353–1336 BC) in order to reflect the dramatic change of Egypt's polytheistic religion into one where the sun disc Aten
Aten
was worshipped over all other gods. Aten
Aten
was not solely worshipped (the religion was not monotheistic), but the other gods were worshipped to a significantly lesser degree
[...More...]

"Amarna Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Middle Kingdom Of Egypt
The Middle Kingdom of Egypt
Egypt
(also known as The Period of Reunification) is the period in the history of ancient Egypt
Egypt
between circa 2050 BC and 1710 BC, stretching from the reunification of Egypt under the impulse of Mentuhotep II
Mentuhotep II
of the Eleventh Dynasty to the end of the Twelfth Dynasty. Some scholars also include the Thirteenth Dynasty of Egypt
Egypt
wholly into this period as well, in which case the Middle Kingdom would finish c. 1650, while others only include it until Merneferre Ay
Merneferre Ay
c. 1700 BC, last king of this dynasty to be attested in both Upper and Lower Egypt
[...More...]

"Middle Kingdom Of Egypt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stela
A stele (/ˈstiːli/ STEE-lee)[Note 1] is a stone or wooden slab, generally taller than it is wide, erected in the ancient world as a monument. Grave
Grave
steles were often used for funerary or commemorative purposes. Stelae as slabs of stone would also be used as ancient Greek and Roman government notices or as boundary markers to mark borders or property lines. The surface of the stele usually has text, ornamentation, or both. The ornamentation may be inscribed, carved in relief, or painted. Traditional Western gravestones may technically be considered the modern equivalent of ancient stelae, though the term is very rarely applied in this way
[...More...]

"Stela" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.