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Psychological Warfare
Psychological
Psychological
warfare (PSYWAR), or the basic aspects of modern psychological operations (PSYOP), have been known by many other names or terms, including MISO, Psy Ops, political warfare, "Hearts and Minds", and propaganda.[1] The term is used "to denote any action which is practiced mainly by psychological methods with the aim of evoking a planned psychological reaction in other people".[2] Various techniques are used, and are aimed at influencing a target audience's value system, belief system, emotions, motives, reasoning, or behavior. It is used to induce confessions or reinforce attitudes and behaviors favorable to the originator's objectives, and are sometimes combined with black operations or false flag tactics. It is also used to destroy the morale of enemies through tactics that aim to depress troops' psychological states.[3][4] Target audiences can be governments, organizations, groups, and individuals, and is not just limited to soldiers
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Mayhem (band)
Mayhem is a Norwegian black metal band formed in 1984 in Oslo. They were one of the founders of the Norwegian black metal scene and their music has strongly influenced the black metal genre. Mayhem's early career was highly controversial, primarily due to their notorious live performances, the 1991 suicide of vocalist Per Yngve Ohlin ("Dead") and the 1993 murder of guitarist Øystein Aarseth
Øystein Aarseth
("Euronymous") by former member Varg Vikernes
Varg Vikernes
("Count Grishnackh"), of Burzum. The group released a demo and an EP that were highly influential, and amassed a loyal following through sporadic and notorious live performances, attracting further attention through their ties to the string of Norwegian church burnings and the incidents of violence surrounding them. Mayhem disbanded after Aarseth's murder, shortly before the release of their debut album, De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas, regarded as a classic of the black metal genre
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Air Combat Manoeuvring
Air combat manoeuvring
Air combat manoeuvring
(also known as ACM or dogfighting) is the tactical art of moving, turning and/or situating one's fighter aircraft in order to attain a position from which an attack can be made on another aircraft. Air combat manoeuvres rely on offensive and defensive basic fighter manoeuvring (BFM) to gain an advantage over an aerial opponent.Contents1 Historical overview 2 Tactics 3 Example manoeuvring 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External linksHistorical overview[edit] Military aviation appeared in World War I
World War I
where aircraft were initially used to spot enemy troop concentrations, field gun positions and movements. Early aerial combat consisted of aviators shooting at one another with hand held weapons.[1] The first recorded aircraft to be shot down by another aircraft, which occurred on October 5, 1914, was a German Aviatik
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Operational Manoeuvre Group
The Operational manoeuvre group (OMG) was a Soviet Army
Soviet Army
organisational maneuver warfare concept created during the early 1950s to replace the Cavalry mechanized group which performed the deep operations on the Eastern Front during the Second World War. The deep operations theory developed in cooperation between the Red Army and Wehrmacht theorists in the 1930s later influenced the Blitzkrieg
Blitzkrieg
operations and echelon-based doctrine. In the Soviet Army
Soviet Army
doctrine the Operational Manoeuvre Groups would be inserted to exploit a breakthrough by a Front during a potential war against NATO
NATO
in Europe
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Tactical Objective
A tactical objective is the immediate short-term desired result of a given activity, task, or mission. Tactical objectives are usually entrusted to the lower positioned management in a three-tier organisation's structure of field or front desk, middle and executive management. While historically the term had been applied to military operations, in the 20th century, it has been increasingly applied in the fields of public safety, such as policing, and fire-fighting, commerce, trade planning, political, and international relations policy. A tactical objective is often an intermediate step to achieving an operational objective, and, as such, requires decision making and problem solving skills applied during the execution of the tactical plan as part of the operational plan. Tactical objectives in the commercial use represent performance targets established by the middle management for achieving specific organisational outcomes
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Defensive Fighting Position
A defensive fighting position (DFP) is a type of earthwork constructed in a military context, generally large enough to accommodate anything from one man to a small number of soldiers.Contents1 Terminology 2 History2.1 Tobruk3 Modern designs 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksTerminology[edit] Tobruk
Tobruk
type positions are named after the system of defensive positions constructed, initially, by the Italian Army at Tobruk, Libya. After Tobruk
Tobruk
fell to the Allies in January 1941, the existing positions were modified and significantly expanded by the Australian Army which, along with other Allied forces, reused them in the Siege of Tobruk. A foxhole is one type of defensive strategic position
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Cover (military)
In military combat, the concept of cover refers to anything which is capable of physically protecting an individual from enemy fire. This differentiates it from the similar concept of concealment, in that an object or area of concealment only affords the benefit of stealth, not actual protection from small arms fire or artillery fragments. An example of "cover vs. concealment" would be sandbags vs. tall grass. Cover may be a naturally occurring feature, such as a rock or a tree stump, or it may be a constructed feature, such as a foxhole or a trench. Uniform[edit] In some military services (especially in the United States), a uniform's hat is sometimes referred to officially as a cover, as in "Hey soldier, remove your cover!" or "You're not in uniform without your cover." It is a convention in the U.S
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Counterattack
A counterattack is a tactic employed in response to an attack, with the term originating in "war games".[1] The general objective is to negate or thwart the advantage gained by the enemy during attack, while the specific objectives typically seek to regain lost ground or destroy the attacking enemy (this may take the form of an opposing sports team or military units).[1][2][3] A saying, attributed to Napoleon
Napoleon
Bonaparte illustrate the tactical importance of the counterattack : "the greatest danger occurs at the moment of victory". In the same spirit, in his Battle Studies, Ardant du Pic noticed that "he, general or mere captain, who employs every one in the storming of a position can be sure of seeing it retaken by an organised counter-attack of four men and a corporal".[4] A counterattack is a military tactic that occurs when one side successfully defends off the enemy’s attack and begins to push the enemy back with an attack of its own
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Charge (warfare)
A charge is a maneuver in battle in which combatants advance towards their enemy at their best speed in an attempt to engage in close combat. The charge is the dominant shock attack and has been the key tactic and decisive moment of many battles throughout history
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Cyberweapon
A cyberweapon is a malware agent employed for military, paramilitary, or intelligence objectives.[citation needed]Contents1 General characteristics1.1 Sponsor 1.2 Objectives 1.3 Target 1.4 Distinctions from viruses and other malware2 Probable cyberweapons 3 Control and disarmament 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksGeneral characteristics[edit] Requirements for the term vary widely; the most common criteria seem to be for a malware agent which:Is sponsored or employed by a state or non-state actor. Meets an objective which would otherwise require espionage or the use of force. Is employed against specific targets.Sponsor[edit] Part of the distinction from other malware is that the agent is sponsored—that is, commissioned, developed, and/or actually used—not by a black-hat hacker or organized criminal group, but instead by a state or a non-state actor, the latter potentially including terrorist groups and other entities proposed
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Industrial Warfare
Industrial warfare[1] is a period in the history of warfare ranging roughly from the early 19th century and the start of the Industrial Revolution to the beginning of the Atomic Age, which saw the rise of nation-states, capable of creating and equipping large armies, navies, and air forces, through the process of industrialization. The era featured mass-conscripted armies, rapid transportation (first on railroads, then by sea and air), telegraph and wireless communications, and the concept of total war
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Siege
A siege is a military blockade of a city, or fortress, with the intent of conquering by attrition, or a well-prepared assault. This derives from sedere, Latin
Latin
for "to sit".[1] Siege
Siege
warfare is a form of constant, low-intensity conflict characterized by one party holding a strong, static, defensive position. Consequently, an opportunity for negotiation between combatants is not uncommon, as proximity and fluctuating advantage can encourage diplomacy. A siege occurs when an attacker encounters a city or fortress that cannot be easily taken by a quick assault, and which refuses to surrender. Sieges involve surrounding the target to block the provision of supplies and the reinforcement or escape of troops (a tactic known as "investment"[2])
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Early Modern Warfare
Early modern warfare
Early modern warfare
is associated with the start of the widespread use of gunpowder and the development of suitable weapons to use the explosive, including artillery and firearms; for this reason the era is also referred to as the age of gunpowder warfare (a concept introduced by Michael Roberts in the 1950s). This entire period is contained within the Age of Sail, which characteristic dominated the era's naval tactics, including the use of gunpowder in naval artillery. All of the Great Powers of Europe and the
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Medieval Warfare
Medieval warfare
Medieval warfare
is the European warfare of the Middle Ages. Technological, cultural, and social developments had forced a dramatic transformation in the character of warfare from antiquity, changing military tactics and the role of cavalry and artillery
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Counter-insurgency
A counter-insurgency or counterinsurgency[1] (COIN) can be defined as "comprehensive civilian and military efforts taken to simultaneously defeat and contain insurgency and address its root causes".[2] An insurgency is a rebellion against a constituted authority when those taking part in the rebellion are not recognized as belligerents.[3] It isthe organized use of subversion and violence to seize, nullify or challenge political control of a region. As such, it is primarily a political struggle, in which both sides use armed force to create space for their political, economic and influence activities to be effective.[2] Counter-insurgency
Counter-insurgency
campaigns of duly-elected or politically recognized governments take place during war, occupation by a foreign military or police force, and when internal conflicts that involve subversion and armed rebellion occur
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Ancient Warfare
Ancient warfare
Ancient warfare
is war as conducted from the beginnings of recorded history to the end of the ancient period. In Europe
Europe
and the Near East, the end of antiquity is often equated with the Fall of Rome
Rome
in 476 AD, the wars of the Eastern Roman Empire
Empire
on its Southwestern Asian and North African borders, and the beginnings of the Muslim conquests
Muslim conquests
in the 7th century. In China, it can also be seen as ending with the growing role of mounted warriors needed to counter the ever-growing threat from the north in the 5th century and the beginning of the Tang Dynasty in 618. In India, the ancient period ends with the decline of the Gupta Empire
Gupta Empire
(6th century) and the beginning of the Muslim conquests there from the 8th century
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