HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Psaltery
A psaltery (or sawtry [archaic]) is a stringed instrument of the zither family.Contents1 Ancient harp psaltery 2 Ancient European zither psaltery 3 Medieval psaltery 4 Modern psaltery 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksAncient harp psaltery[edit] The psaltery of Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
(epigonion) is a harp-like instrument. The word psaltery derives from the Ancien
[...More...]

"Psaltery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Red-figure Pottery
Red-figure vase painting is one of the most important styles of figural Greek vase painting. It developed in Athens
Athens
around 520 BC and remained in use until the late 3rd century BC. It replaced the previously dominant style of black-figure vase painting within a few decades. Its modern name is based on the figural depictions in red colour on a black background, in contrast to the preceding black-figure style with black figures on a red background. The most important areas of production, apart from Attica, were in Southern Italy. The style was also adopted in other parts of Greece. Etruria
Etruria
became an important centre of production outside the Greek World. Attic red-figure vases were exported throughout Greece
Greece
and beyond. For a long time, they dominated the market for fine ceramics
[...More...]

"Red-figure Pottery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

2 Samuel
The Books of Samuel,[a] 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, and are considered by many biblical scholars to belong to the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.[1] According to Jewish tradition, the book was written by Samuel, with additions by the prophets Gad and Nathan;[2] modern scholarly thinking is that the entire Deuteronomistic history was composed in the period c. 630–540 BC by combining a number of independent texts of various ages.[3][4] Samuel begins with the prophet Samuel's birth[5] and God's call to him as a boy. The story of the Ark of the Covenant that follows tells of Israel's oppression by the Philistines, which brought about Samuel's anointing of Saul as Israel's first king
[...More...]

"2 Samuel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
[...More...]

"Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dulcimer
A dulcimer is a type of musical string instrument. It is a species of zither. Among its forms are:Hammered dulcimer, free-standing, most frequently but not always trapezoidal in shape, with many strings struck by handheld "hammers". This type of instrument is found in many cultures, especially in England, in the British Isles and in the north of continental Europe. Most countries have their own name for the instrument, for instance in Thailand it is called a khim, in India it is called Santoor and many have different tuning systems
[...More...]

"Dulcimer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bow (music)
In music, a bow is a tensioned stick with hair affixed to it which is moved across some part of a musical instrument causing vibration, which the instrument emits as sound. The vast majority of bows are used with string instruments, such as the violin, although some bows are used with musical saws and other bowed idiophones.Contents1 Materials and manufacture 2 Types of bow 3 Bowing 4 History4.1 Origin 4.2 The modern Western bow 4.3 Historical bows 4.4 Stradivarius
Stradivarius
bows 4.5 Other types of bow5 Maintenance 6 Nomenclature 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksMaterials and manufacture[edit]Frog of a modern violin bow (K. Gerhard Penzel)Tip of a modern violin bow (K. Gerhard Penzel)A bow consists of a specially shaped stick with other material forming a ribbon stretched between its ends, which is used to stroke the string and create sound. Different musical cultures have adopted various designs for the bow
[...More...]

"Bow (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pelike
A pelike (Ancient Greek: πελίκη) is a one-piece ceramic container similar to an amphora. It has two open handles that are vertical on their lateral aspects and even at the side with the edge of the belly, a narrow neck, a flanged mouth, and a sagging, almost spherical belly. Unlike the often-pointed bottom of many amphorae, the pelike's bottom is always flanged so it will stand on its own. Pelikes are often intricately painted, usually depicting a scene involving people
[...More...]

"Pelike" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Course (music)
A course, on a stringed musical instrument, is two or more adjacent strings that are closely spaced relative to the other strings, and typically played as a single string. The strings in each course are typically tuned in unison or an octave
[...More...]

"Course (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Diminutive
A diminutive is a word which has been modified to convey a slighter degree of its root meaning, to convey the smallness of the object or quality named, or to convey a sense of intimacy or endearment.[1][2] A diminutive form (abbreviated DIM) is a word-formation device used to express such meanings; in many languages, such forms can be translated as "little" and diminutives can also be formed as multi-word constructions such as "Tiny Tim". Diminutives are used frequently when speaking to small children or when expressing extreme tenderness and intimacy to an adult. As such, they are often employed for nicknames and pet names. The opposite of the diminutive form is the augmentative
[...More...]

"Diminutive" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Book Of Daniel
The Book
Book
of Daniel is a biblical apocalypse, combining a prophecy of history with an eschatology (the study of last things) which is both cosmic in scope and political in its focus.[1] In more mundane language, it is "an account of the activities and visions of Daniel, a noble Jew exiled at Babylon,"[2] its message being that just as the God of Israel saved Daniel and his friends from their enemies, so he would save all of Israel in their present oppression.[3] In the
[...More...]

"Book Of Daniel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aramaic
Aramaic[2] (אַרָמָיָא Arāmāyā, Classical Syriac: ܐܪܡܝܐ‎, Arabic: آرامية‎) is a language or group of languages belonging to the Semitic subfamily of the Afroasiatic language family. More specifically, it is part of the Northwest Semitic group, which also includes the Canaanite languages such as Hebrew and Phoenician. The Aramaic alphabet
Aramaic alphabet
was widely adopted for other languages and is ancestral to the Hebrew, Syriac and Arabic alphabets. During its approximately 3,100 years of written history,[3] Aramaic has served variously as a language of administration of empires and as a language of divine worship, religious study and as the spoken tongue of a number of Semitic peoples from the Near East. Historically, Aramaic was the language of Aramean tribes, a Semitic people of the region around between the Levant
Levant
and the northern Euphrates
Euphrates
valley
[...More...]

"Aramaic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nehemiah
Nehemiah
Nehemiah
is the central figure of the Book of Nehemiah, which describes his work in rebuilding Jerusalem during the Second Temple period. He was governor of Persian Judea under Artaxerxes I of Persia[1] (c. 5th century BC). The name is pronounced /ˌniːəˈmaɪə/ or /ˌniːhəˈmaɪə/ in English
[...More...]

"Nehemiah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

I Kings
The two Books of Kings, originally a single book, are the eleventh and twelfth books of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
or Old Testament
[...More...]

"I Kings" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Triangle
A triangle is a polygon with three edges and three vertices. It is one of the basic shapes in geometry. A triangle with vertices A, B, and C is denoted △ A B C displaystyle triangle ABC . In Euclidean geometry
Euclidean geometry
any three points, when non-collinear, determine a unique triangle and simultaneously, a unique plane (i.e. a two-dimensional Euclidean space). In other words, there is only one plane that contains that triangle, and every triangle is contained in some plane. If the entire geometry is only the Euclidean plane, there is only one plane and all triangles are contained in it; however, in higher dimensional Euclidean spaces this is no longer true
[...More...]

"Triangle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

I Samuel
The Books of Samuel,[a] 1 Samuel
Samuel
and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im
Nevi'im
or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, and are considered by many biblical scholars to belong to the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel
Samuel
and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites
Israelites
and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.[1] According to Jewish tradition, the book was written by Samuel, with additions by the prophets Gad and Nathan;[2] modern scholarly thinking is that the entire Deuteronomistic history was composed in the period c. 630–540 BC by combining a number of independent texts of various ages.[3][4] Samuel
Samuel
begins with the prophet Samuel's birth[5] and God's call to him as a boy
[...More...]

"I Samuel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
[...More...]

"Ancient Greek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.