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Pruitt-Igoe
Coordinates: 38°38′32.24″N 90°12′33.95″W / 38.6422889°N 90.2094306°W / 38.6422889; -90.2094306April 1972. The second, widely televised demolition of a Pruitt–Igoe building that followed the March 16 demolition[1]The Wendell O. Pruitt
Wendell O. Pruitt
Homes and William Igoe Apartments, known together as Pruitt-Igoe, were joint urban housing projects first occupied in 1954[2] in the U.S. city of St. Louis, Missouri. Living conditions in Pruitt–Igoe
Pruitt–Igoe
began to decline soon after completion in 1956.[3] By the late 1960s, the complex had become internationally infamous for its poverty, crime, and racial segregation. All 33 buildings were demolished with explosives in the mid-1970s,[4] and the project has become an icon of failure of urban renewal and of public-policy planning. The complex was designed by architect Minoru Yamasaki, who also designed the World Trade Center towers and the St
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Skip-stop
Skip-stop
Skip-stop
is a public transit service pattern which reduces travel times and increases capacity by not having all vehicles make all designated stops along a route
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Wendell O. Pruitt
Wendell Oliver Pruitt (June 20, 1920 – April 15, 1945) was a pioneering African-American
African-American
military pilot and Tuskegee
Tuskegee
Airman[1] originally from St. Louis, Missouri. He was killed during a training exercise in 1945.[2] After his death, his name, along with William L. Igoe's was given to the notorious Pruitt–Igoe
Pruitt–Igoe
public housing complex in St. Louis.Contents1 Biography 2 Military career 3 Death 4 Honors4.1 U.S. decorations and badges 4.2 Things named for Pruitt5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Pruitt grew up in St
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World War II
Pacific WarChina Pacific Ocean South-East Asia South West Pacific Japan Manchuria & North Korea Mediterranean and Middle EastNorth Africa East Africa Mediterranean Sea Adriatic Malta Yugoslavia Iraq Syria–Lebanon Iran Italy Dodecanese Southern France Other campaignsAtlantic Arctic Strategic bombing Americas French West Africa Indian Ocean Madagascar Contemporaneous warsSoviet–Japanese border conflicts Franco-Thai War Ecuadorian–Peruvian War Ili Rebellion World War II Alphabetical indices A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0–9Navigation CampaignsCountriesEquipment TimelineOutlineLists PortalCategoryBibliography vte World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis
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William L. Igoe
William Leo Igoe (October 19, 1879 – April 20, 1953) was a United States Representative from Missouri. Igoe was born in St. Louis
St. Louis
to Irish immigrants.[1] He attended the public and parochial schools of St. Louis
St. Louis
and graduated from the law school of Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis
in 1902. He was admitted to the bar in the same year and commenced the practice of law in St. Louis. He was a member of the municipal assembly of St. Louis
St. Louis
from 1909 until March 3, 1913, when he resigned to enter the United States Congress. Igoe was elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-third and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1921). On April 6, 1917, he joined 49 other representatives in voting against declaring war on Germany. He declined to become a candidate for renomination in 1920
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Congress Of The United States
535 voting members100 senators 435 representatives6 non-voting membersSenate political groups     Republican (51)      Democratic (47)      Independent (2) (caucusing with Democrats)House of Representatives political groups     Republican (238)      Democratic (193)      Vacant (4)ElectionsSenate last electionNovember 8, 2016House of Representatives last electionNovember 8, 2016Meeting place United States
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Korean War
Military stalemateNorth Korean invasion of South Korea
South Korea
repelled Subsequent U.S.-led United Nations
United Nations
invasion of
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Architectural Forum
Architectural Forum
Architectural Forum
was an American magazine that covered the homebuilding industry and architecture. Started in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1892 as The Brickbuilder, it absorbed the magazine Architect's world in October 1938, and ceased publication in 1974.[1][2][3] Other titles[edit]1892–1916: The Brickbuilder 1917–1945: Architectural forum 1952–1954: The Magazine of buildingReferences[edit]^ Rybczynski, Witold (November 15, 2006). "The Glossies: The decline of architecture magazines". Slate. Retrieved August 20, 2011.  ^ "Architectural forum: the magazine of building". Johns Hopkins University Libraries. Retrieved August 20, 2011.  ^ Horsley, Carter B. (1974-03-26). "END OF MAGAZINE ON ARCHITECTURE". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331
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Le Corbusier
Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, known as Le Corbusier
Le Corbusier
(French: [lə kɔʁbyˈzje]; 6 October 1887 – 27 August 1965), was a Swiss-French architect, designer, painter, urban planner, writer, and one of the pioneers of what is now called modern architecture. He was born in Switzerland
Switzerland
and became a French citizen in 1930. His career spanned five decades and he designed buildings in Europe, Japan, India, and North and South America. Dedicated to providing better living conditions for the residents of crowded cities, Le Corbusier
Le Corbusier
was influential in urban planning, and was a founding member of the Congrès International d'Architecture Moderne (CIAM)
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Congrès International D'Architecture Moderne
The Congrès internationaux d'architecture moderne (CIAM), or International Congresses of Modern Architecture, was an organization founded in 1928 and disbanded in 1959, responsible for a series of events and congresses arranged across Europe by the most prominent architects of the time, with the objective of spreading the principles of the Modern Movement focusing in all the main domains of architecture (such as landscape, urbanism, industrial design, and many others).Contents1 Formation and membership 2 Influence 3 CIRPAC 4 Conferences 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 See alsoFormation and membership[edit] The International Congresses of Modern Architecture
Modern Architecture
(CIAM) was founded in June 1928, at the Chateau de la Sarraz in Switzerland, by a group of 28 European architects organized by Le Corbusier, Hélène de Mandrot (owner of the castle), and Sigfried Giedion (the first secretary-general)
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Harland Bartholomew
Harland Bartholomew
Harland Bartholomew
(September 14, 1889 – December 2, 1989) was an American urban planner. Although a civil engineer by training and disposition, Harland's career started just as the automobile production was about to take off, industrial development was booming and urban populations grew. The novel challenges and opportunities brought about by this new form of transport inspired the invention of new community concepts and required the development of new approaches to planning transportation in cities. These challenges called for the skills of an engineer to analyze transportation needs quantitiatively as well as those of a person passionate about urban design and social conditions. Harland was able to deliver these qualities
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Apartment Building
An apartment (American English), flat (British English) or unit (Australian English) is a self-contained housing unit (a type of residential real estate) that occupies only part of a building, generally on a single level. Such a building may be called an apartment building, apartment complex, flat complex, block of flats, tower block, high-rise or, occasionally, mansion block (in British English), especially if it consists of many apartments for rent. In Scotland, it is called a block of flats or, if it is a traditional sandstone building, a tenement, a term which has a pejorative connotation in the United States
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Garbage Chute
A chute is a vertical or inclined plane, channel, or passage through which objects are moved by means of gravity.Contents1 Landform 2 Building chute 3 Chutes in transportation 4 ReferencesLandform[edit] A Chute (gravity)
Chute (gravity)
also known as a race, flume, cat, or river canyon, is a steep-sided passage through which water flows rapidly. Akin to these, man-made chutes, such as the timber slide and log flume, were used in the logging industry to facilitate the downstream transportation of timber along rivers. These are no longer in common use. Man-made chutes may also be a feature of spillways on some dams. Some types of water supply and irrigation systems are gravity fed, hence chutes. These include aqueducts, puquios, and acequias. Building chute[edit] Chutes are in common use in tall buildings to allow the rapid transport of items from the upper floors to a central location on one of the lower floors or basement
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Acre
The acre is a unit of land area used in the imperial and US customary systems. It is defined as the area of 1 chain by 1 furlong (66 by 660 feet), which is exactly equal to ​1⁄640 of a square mile, 43,560 square feet, approximately 4,047 m2, or about 40% of a hectare. The acre is commonly used in many countries, including the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, India, Ghana, and others. The international symbol of the acre is ac. The most commonly used acre today is the international acre. In the United States both the international acre and the US survey acre are in use, but differ by only two parts per million; see below. The most common use of the acre is to measure tracts of land
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Union Wage Premium
A union wage premium refers to the degree in which union wages exceed non-union member wages. Union wage premiums are one of the most researched and analyzed issues in economics especially in labor economics.[1] Unions and their struggle for wages and better benefits usually target larger firms that have a concentrated industry.[2] Unions have an effect on wages, the probability of gaining benefits, productivity of the worker, and workplace protections.[3]Contents1 Dynamics 2 Narrowing of the Union Wage Premium Gap 3 Impact of Union Wage Premiums 4 How to Estimate the Union Wage Premium 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDynamics[edit] One of the characteristics of a union is to try to bargain and negotiate wages and hours
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