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Provinces Of China
ProvincesAutonomous regions Special
Special
administrative regionsSub-provincial levelSub-provincial citiesSub-provincial autonomous prefecturesSub-provincial city districtsPrefectural level (2nd) Prefectural citiesAutonomous prefecturesLeaguesPrefectures (abolishing)Sub-prefectural-levelSub-prefectural citiesProvincial-controlled citiesProvincial-controlled countiesProvincial-controlled districtsCounty level (3rd) CountiesAutonomous countiesCounty-level citiesDistricts Ethnic dist
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Unitary State
A unitary state is a state governed as a single power in which the central government is ultimately supreme and any administrative divisions (sub-national units) exercise only the powers that the central government chooses to delegate. The majority of states in the world have a unitary system of government. Of the 193 UN member states, 165 are governed as unitary states. In a unitary state, sub-national units are created and abolished (an example being the 22 mainland regions of France
France
being merged into 13), and their powers may be broadened and narrowed, by the central government. Although political power may be delegated through devolution to local governments by statute, the central government remains supreme; it may abrogate the acts of devolved governments or curtail their powers. The United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
is an example of a unitary state
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Tibetan Alphabet
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
32 c. BCE Hieratic
Hieratic
32 c. BCEDemotic 7 c. BCEMeroitic 3 c. BCEProto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCEUgaritic 15 c. BCE Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCEGe’ez 5–6 c. BCEPhoenician 12 c. BCEPaleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCESamaritan 6 c. BCE Libyco-Berber
Libyco-Berber
3 c. BCETifinaghPaleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE Aramaic 8 c. BCE Kharoṣṭhī
Kharoṣṭhī
4 c. BCE Brāhmī 4 c. BCE Brahmic family
Brahmic family
(see)E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE Devanagari
Devanagari
13 c. CECanadian syllabics 1840Hebrew 3 c. BCE Pahlavi 3 c. BCEAvestan 4 c. CEPalmyrene 2 c. BCE Syriac 2 c. BCENabataean 2 c. BCEArabic 4 c. CEN'Ko 1949 CESogdian 2 c. BCEOrkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CEOld Hungarian c. 650 CEOld UyghurMongolian 1204 CEMandaic 2 c. CEGreek 8 c. BCEEtruscan 8 c. BCELatin 7 c
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Sum (country Subdivision)
Sum, sumu, sumon, and somon (Plural: sumd) are a type of administrative district used in China, Mongolia, and Russia.Contents1 China 2 Mongolia 3 Russia 4 See also 5 ReferencesChina[edit] In Inner Mongolia, a sumu (Mongolian: ᠰᠤᠮᠤ, transliteration: sumu; Chinese: 苏木, pinyin: sūmù) is a township-level political/administrative division. The sumu division is equivalent to a township but is unique to Inner Mongolia. It is therefore larger than a gaqa (Mongolian: ᠭᠠᠴᠠᠭᠠ гацаа) and smaller than a banner (the Inner Mongolia
Mongolia
equivalent of the county-level division). Sumu whose population is predominated by ethnic minorities are designated ethnic sumu – parallel with the ethnic township in the rest of China
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Subdistricts Of The People's Republic Of China
ProvincesAutonomous regions Special
Special
administrative regionsSub-provincial levelSub-provincial citiesSub-provincial autonomous prefecturesSub-provincial city districtsPrefectural level (2nd) Prefectural citiesAutonomous prefecturesLeaguesPrefectures (abolishing)Sub-prefectural-levelSub-prefectural citiesProvincial-controlled citiesProvincial-controlled countiesProvincial-controlled districtsCounty level (3rd) CountiesAutonomous countiesCounty-level citiesDistricts Ethnic dist
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Townships Of The People's Republic Of China
ProvincesAutonomous regions Special
Special
administrative regionsSub-provincial levelSub-provincial citiesSub-provincial autonomous prefecturesSub-provincial city districtsPrefectural level (2nd) Prefectural citiesAutonomous prefecturesLeaguesPrefectures (abolishing)Sub-prefectural-levelSub-prefectural citiesProvincial-controlled citiesProvincial-controlled countiesProvincial-controlled districtsCounty level (3rd) CountiesAutonomous countiesCounty-level citiesDistricts Ethnic dist
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Shennongjia
Shennongjia
Shennongjia
Forestry District (Chinese: 神农架林区) is a county-level administrative unit (a "forestry district") in northwestern Hubei
Hubei
province, People's Republic of China, directly subordinated to the provincial government. It occupies 3,253 square kilometres (1,256 sq mi) in western Hubei, and, as of 2007 had the resident population estimated at 74,000 (with the registered population of 79,976)
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Uyghur New Script
Uyghur Yëngi Yëziqi (abbreviated UYY; literally Uyghur New Script) or Uyƣur Yengi Yeziⱪi (literally new script; Uyghur: يېڭى يېزىقى‎, Йеңи Йезиқи, Yëngi Yëziqi; Chinese: 新维文; pinyin: Xīnwéiwén; sometimes falsely rendered as Yengi Yeziķ or Yengi Yezik̡), is a Latin alphabet, with both Uniform Turkic Alphabet and Pinyin
Pinyin
influence, used for writing the Uyghur language during 1965~1982, primarily by Uyghurs living in China, although the use of Uyghur Ereb Yëziqi
Uyghur Ereb Yëziqi
is much more widespread. It was devised around 1959 and came to replace the Cyrillic-derived alphabet Uyghur Siril Yëziqi which had been used in China
China
after the proclamation of the People's Republic of China
China
in 1949
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Uyghur Latin Alphabet
The Uyghur Latin alphabet
Uyghur Latin alphabet
(Uyghur: ئۇيغۇ ر لاتىن يېزىقى‎, Уйғур Латин Йезиқи, Uyghur Latin Yëziqi, ULY) is an auxiliary alphabet for the Uyghur language
Uyghur language
based on the Latin script. Uyghur is primarily written in an Arabic alphabet and sometimes in a Cyrillic alphabet.Contents1 Construction 2 Purpose 3 Public reception 4 Comparison of orthographies 5 Text example 6 See also 7 External links 8 FootnotesConstruction[edit] The ULY project was finalized at Xinjiang University, Ürümqi, Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
(XUAR), People's Republic of China in July 2001, at the fifth conference of a series held there for that purpose that started in November 2000
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Uyghur Language
 China Xinjiang
Xinjiang
Uyghur Autonomous Region[2]Regulated by Working Committee of Ethnic Language and Writing of Xinjiang
Xinjiang
Uyghur Autonomous RegionLanguage codesISO 639-1 ug Uighur, UyghurISO 639-2 uig Uighur, UyghurISO 639-3 uig Uighur, UyghurGlottolog uigh1240  Uighur[3]Geographical extent of Uyghur in ChinaThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.This article contains Uyghur text
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Mongolian Script
The classical or traditional Mongolian script
Mongolian script
(in Mongolian script: ᠮᠣᠩᠭᠣᠯ ᠪᠢᠴᠢᠭ Mongγol bičig; in Mongolian Cyrillic: Монгол бичиг Mongol bichig), also known as Hudum Mongol bichig, was the first writing system created specifically for the Mongolian language, and was the most successful until the introduction of Cyrillic in 1946. Derived from the Old Uyghur alphabet,[1] Mongolian is a true alphabet, with separate letters for consonants and vowels. The Mongolian script
Mongolian script
has been adapted to write languages such as Oirat and Manchu
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Zhuang Language
The Zhuang languages
Zhuang languages
(autonym: Vahcuengh, pre-1982: Vaƅcueŋƅ, Sawndip: 話僮, from vah 'language' and Cuengh 'Zhuang'; simplified Chinese: 壮语; traditional Chinese: 壯語; pinyin: Zhuàngyǔ) are any of more than a dozen Tai languages
Tai languages
spoken by the Zhuang people
Zhuang people
of southern China
China
in the province of Guangxi
Guangxi
and adjacent parts of Yunnan and Guangdong. The Zhuang languages
Zhuang languages
do not form a monophyletic linguistic unit, as northern and southern Zhuang languages
Zhuang languages
are more closely related to other Tai languages
Tai languages
than to each other
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Wylie Transliteration
The Wylie transliteration
Wylie transliteration
scheme is a method for transliterating Tibetan script
Tibetan script
using only the letters available on a typical English language typewriter. It bears the name of Turrell V
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National Central City
National Central City
National Central City
(simplified Chinese: 国家中心城市; traditional Chinese: 國家中心城市; pinyin: Guójiā Zhōngxīn Chéngshì) was a concept proposed by the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development of the People's Republic of China in 2005 as a first step in reforming urbanization in China
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Chinese Language
Legend:   Countries identified Chinese as a primary, administrative, or native language   Countries with more than 5,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 1,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 500,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 100,000 Chinese speakers   Major Chinese-speaking settlementsThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese, also known as Modern Standard Mandarin, Standard Mandarin, or simply Mandarin, is a standard variety of Chinese that is the sole official language of both China
China
and Taiwan
Taiwan
(de facto), and also one of the four official languages of Singapore. Its pronunciation is based on the Beijing
Beijing
dialect, its vocabulary on the Mandarin dialects, and its grammar is based on written vernacular Chinese. Like other varieties of Chinese, Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
is a tonal language with topic-prominent organization and subject–verb–object word order. It has more initial consonants but fewer vowels, final consonants and tones than southern varieties
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