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Protestantism
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It originated with the Reformation,[b] a movement against what its followers con
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Protestant (album)
Protestant is the second and final studio album by American hardcore punk band Rorschach. It was released in 1993 through Wardance Records and Gern Blandsten. The most of the tracks off the album were written during the band's Europe tour.[1] The band's complex combination of metal and hardcore[1][2] influenced many artists in the metalcore genre,[3] including Converge guitarist Kurt Ballou.[4] The tracks on the album were featured on the 1995 compilation album, Autopsy.[2] The track "Traditional" was covered by Krallice.[5]Contents1 Critical reception 2 Track listing 3 Personnel 4 References 5 External linksCritical reception[edit] The album was inducted to Decibel's Hall of Fame
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Eucharist
The Eucharist
Eucharist
(/ˈjuːkərɪst/; also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper, among other names) is a Christian
Christian
rite that is considered a sacrament in most churches and an ordinance in others. According to the New Testament, the rite was instituted by Jesus Christ
Christ
during his Last Supper; giving his disciples bread and wine during the Passover
Passover
meal, Jesus
Jesus
commanded his followers to "do this in memory of me" while referring to the bread as "my body" and the wine as "my blood".[1][2] Through the Eucharistic celebration Christians remember both Christ's sacrifice of himself on the cross and his commission of the apostles at the Last Supper.[3] The elements of the Eucharist, bread (leavened or unleavened) and wine (or grape juice), are consecrated on an altar (or table) and consumed thereafter
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Papal Supremacy
Papal supremacy
Papal supremacy
is the doctrine of the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
that the Pope, by reason of his offic
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Sacred Tradition
Sacred Tradition, or Holy Tradition, is a theological term used in some Christian traditions, primarily those claiming apostolic succession such as the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Assyrian, and Anglican traditions, to refer to the foundation of the doctrinal and spiritual authority of the Christian Church
Christian Church
and of the Bible. The word "tradition" is taken from the Latin
Latin
trado, tradere, meaning "to hand over, to deliver, to bequeath". The teachings of Jesus Christ and the holy Apostles are preserved in writing in the Scriptures
Scriptures
as well as word of mouth and are handed on. This perpetual handing on of the Tradition is called the Living Tradition; it is the faithful and constant transmission of the teachings of the Apostles from one generation to the next
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Good Works
In Christian theology, good works, or simply works, are a person's (exterior) actions or deeds, in contrast to inner qualities such as grace or faith.Contents1 Old Testament 2 New Testament 3 Principle of Sola fide 4 The Latter Day Saints (Mormon) view 5 See also 6 ReferencesOld Testament[edit] Proverbs 21:3 says that "To do what is right and just is more acceptable to the LORD than sacrifice." New Testament[edit] The New Testament
New Testament
exhibits a tension between two aspects of grace: the idea that grace is from God is sufficient to cover any sin as well as offer redemption (except the Unforgivable sin) and the idea that grace does not free humans from their responsibility to behave morally. John the Baptist, who preached a baptism of repentance, connected repentance with bearing fruit saying, "Produce fruit in keeping with repentance" (Matthew 3:8)
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Jesus In Christianity
In Christianity, Jesus
Jesus
is believed to be the Messiah
Messiah
(Christ) and through his crucifixion and resurrection, humans can be reconciled to God and thereby are offered salvation and the promise of eternal life.[2] These teachings emphasize that as the willing Lamb of God, Jesus
Jesus
chose to suffer on the cross at Calvary
Calvary
as a sign of his full obedience to the will of God the Father, as an "agent and servant of God".[3][4] The choice Jesus
Jesus
made thus counter-positions him as a new man of morality and obedience, in contrast to Adam's disobedience.[5] Christians believe that Jesus
Jesus
was both human and divine—the Son of God
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Sacraments In The Catholic Church
There are seven sacraments of the Catholic Church, which according to Catholic theology
Catholic theology
were instituted by Jesus
Jesus
and entrusted to the Church. Sacraments are visible rites seen as signs and efficacious channels of the grace of God to all those who receive them with the proper disposition
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Real Presence Of Christ In The Eucharist
The real presence of Christ in the Eucharist
Eucharist
is a term used in Christian theology
Christian theology
to express the doctrine that Jesus is really or substantially present in the Eucharist, not merely symbolically or metaphorically. There are a number of different views in the understanding of the meaning of the term "reality" in this context among contemporary Christian confessions which accept it, including the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Church of the East, Lutheranism, Anglicanism
Anglicanism
and Methodism.[1][2] These differences correspond to literal or figurative interpretations of Christ's Words of Institution, as well as questions related to the concept of realism in the context of the Platonic substance and accident
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Christians
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Bible
Bible
(from Koine Greek
Koine Greek
τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books")[1] is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews
Jews
and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans. Many different authors contributed to the Bible
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Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Christian Ethics
Christian ethics
Christian ethics
is a branch of Christian theology
Christian theology
that defines virtuous behavior and wrong behavior from a Christian perspective. Systematic theological study of Christian ethics
Christian ethics
is called moral theology, possibly with the name of the respective theological tradition, e.g. Catholic moral theology. Christian virtues are often divided into four cardinal virtues and three theological virtues. Christian ethics
Christian ethics
includes questions regarding how the rich should act toward the poor, how women are to be treated, and the morality of war
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Sola Fide
Sola fide
Sola fide
(Latin: by faith alone), also known as justification by faith alone, is a Christian
Christian
theological doctrine that distinguishes Protestant churches from the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and the Eastern Orthodox Church. The doctrine of sola fide asserts God's pardon for guilty sinners is granted to and received through faith alone, excluding all "works". All mankind, it is asserted, is fallen and sinful, under the curse of God, and incapable of saving itself from God's wrath and curse. But God, on the basis of the life, death, and resurrection of his Son, Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ
alone (solus Christus), grants sinners judicial pardon, or justification, which is received solely through faith
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Plymouth Brethren
The Plymouth Brethren
Plymouth Brethren
are a conservative, low church, nonconformist, evangelical Christian
Christian
movement whose history can be traced to Dublin, Ireland, in the late 1820s, originating from Anglicanism.[1][2] Among other beliefs, the group emphasizes sola scriptura, the belief that the Bible
Bible
is the supreme authority for church doctrine and practice over and above any other source of authority. Plymouth Brethren
Plymouth Brethren
generally see themselves as a network of like-minded independent churches, not as a denomination. They would generally prefer that their gatherings be referred to as "assemblies" rather than "churches" but, in the interests of simplicity, this article uses both terms interchangeably. An influential figure among the early Plymouth Brethren
Plymouth Brethren
was John Nelson Darby (1800–82)
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Neo-charismatic Movement
The Neo-charismatic (also third-wave charismatic or hypercharismatic) movement is a movement within evangelical protestant Christianity which places emphasis on the use of charismata (or spiritual gifts) such as glossolalia, prophecy, divine healing, and divine revelation, which are believed to be given to them by the Holy Spirit. The Neo-charismatic movement is considered to be the "third wave" of the charismatic Christian tradition which began with Pentecostalism
Pentecostalism
(the "first wave"), and was furthered by the evangelical charismatic movement (the "second wave")
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