HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Programming Paradigm
Programming paradigms are a way to classify programming languages based on their features. Languages can be classified into multiple paradigms. Some paradigms are concerned mainly with implications for the execution model of the language, such as allowing side effects, or whether the sequence of operations is defined by the execution model. Other paradigms are concerned mainly with the way that code is organized, such as grouping a code into units along with the state that is modified by the code
[...More...]

"Programming Paradigm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Natural-language Programming
Natural-language programming (NLP) is an ontology-assisted way of programming in terms of natural-language sentences, e.g. English. A structured document with Content, sections and subsections for explanations of sentences forms a NLP document, which is actually a computer program. Natural languages and natural-language user interfaces include Inform7, a natural programming language for making interactive fiction, Ring[1][2], a general-purpose language, Shakespeare, an esoteric natural programming language in the style of the plays of William Shakespeare, and Wolfram Alpha, a computational knowledge engine, using natural-language input.Contents1 Interpretation 2 Software paradigm 3 Publication value of natural-language programs and documents 4 Contribution of natural-language programs to machine knowledge 5 See also 6 Bibliography 7 References 8 External linksInterpretation[edit] The smallest unit of statement in NLP is a sentence
[...More...]

"Natural-language Programming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spreadsheet
A spreadsheet is an interactive computer application for organization, analysis and storage of data in tabular form.[1][2][3] Spreadsheets are developed as computerized simulations of paper accounting worksheets.[4] The program operates on data entered in cells of a table. Each cell may contain either numeric or text data, or the results of formulas that automatically calculate and display a value based on the contents of other cells. A spreadsheet may also refer to one such electronic document.[5][6][7] Spreadsheet
Spreadsheet
users can adjust any stored value and observe the effects on calculated values. This makes the spreadsheet useful for "what-if" analysis since many cases can be rapidly investigated without manual recalculation
[...More...]

"Spreadsheet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dynamic Programming Language
Dynamic programming
Dynamic programming
language, in computer science, is a class of high-level programming languages which, at runtime, execute many common programming behaviors that static programming languages perform during compilation. These behaviors could include extension of the program, by adding new code, by extending objects and definitions, or by modifying the type system. Although similar behaviours can be emulated in nearly any language, with varying degrees of difficulty, complexity and performance costs, dynamic languages provide direct tools to make use of them
[...More...]

"Dynamic Programming Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Literate Programming
Literate programming
Literate programming
is a programming paradigm introduced by Donald Knuth in which a program is given as an explanation of the program logic in a natural language, such as English, interspersed with snippets of macros and traditional source code, from which a compilable source code can be generated.[1] The literate programming paradigm, as conceived by Knuth, represents a move away from writing programs in the manner and order imposed by the computer, and instead enables programmers to develop programs in the order demanded by the logic and flow of their thoughts.[2] Literate programs are written as an uninterrupted exposition of
[...More...]

"Literate Programming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Service-oriented Architecture
A service-oriented architecture (SOA) is a style of software design where services are provided to the other components by application components, through a communication protocol over a network
[...More...]

"Service-oriented Architecture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Programming Model
A Programming Model refers to the style of programming where execution is invoked by making what appear to be library calls. Examples include the POSIX Threads library and Hadoop's MapReduce.[1] In both cases, the execution model is different from that of the base language in which the code is written. For example, the C programming language
C programming language
has no execution model for thread behavior. But thread behavior can be invoked from C syntax, by making, what appears to be, a call to a normal C library. What distinguishes a programming model from a normal library is that the behavior of the call cannot be understood in terms of the language the program is written in. For example, the behavior of calls to the POSIX thread library cannot be understood in terms of the C language. The reason is that the call invokes an execution model that is different from the execution model of the language
[...More...]

"Programming Model" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Concurrent Logic Programming
Concurrent logic programming is a variant of logic programming in which programs are sets of guarded Horn clauses of the form:H :- G1, …, Gn B1, …, Bn.The conjunction G1, … , Gn is called the guard of the clause, and is the commitment operator. Declaratively, guarded Horn clauses are read as ordinary logical implications:H if G1 and … and Gn or B1 and … and Bn.However, procedurally, when there are several clauses whose heads H match a given goal, then all of the clauses are executed in parallel, checking whether their guards G1, … , Gn hold. If the guards of more than one clause hold, then a committed choice is made to one of the clauses, and execution proceedes with the subgoals B1, …, Bn of the chosen clause. These subgoals can also be executed in parallel
[...More...]

"Concurrent Logic Programming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Concurrent Constraint Logic Programming
Concurrent constraint logic programming is a version of constraint logic programming aimed primarily at programming concurrent processes rather than (or in addition to) solving constraint satisfaction problems. Goals in constraint logic programming are evaluated concurrently; a concurrent process is therefore programmed as the evaluation of a goal by the interpreter. Syntactically, concurrent constraints logic programs are similar to non-concurrent programs, the only exception being that clauses include guards, which are constraints that may block the applicability of the clause under some conditions. Semantically, concurrent constraint logic programming differs from its non-concurrent versions because a goal evaluation is intended to realize a concurrent process rather than finding a solution to a problem
[...More...]

"Concurrent Constraint Logic Programming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Relativistic Programming
Relativistic programming (RP) is a style of concurrent programming where instead of trying to avoid conflicts between readers and writers (or writers and writers in some cases) the algorithm is designed to tolerate them and get a correct result regardless of the order of events. Also, relativistic programming algorithms are designed to work without the presences of a global order of events. That is, there may be some cases where one thread sees two events in a different order than another thread (hence the term relativistic because in Einstein's theory of special relativity[citation needed] the order of events is not always the same to different viewers). Relativistic programming provides advantages in performance compared to other concurrency paradigms because it does not require one thread to wait for another nearly as often
[...More...]

"Relativistic Programming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Homoiconicity
In computer programming, homoiconicity (from the Greek words homo meaning the same and icon meaning representation) is a property of some programming languages in which the program structure is similar to its syntax, and therefore the program's internal representation can be inferred by reading the text's layout.[1] If a language is homoiconic, it means that the language text has the same structure as its abstract syntax tree (AST) (i.e. the AST and the syntax are isomorphic). This allows all code in the language to be accessed and transformed as data, using the same representation. This property is often summarized saying that the language treats "code as data". In a homoiconic language, the primary representation of programs is also a data structure in a primitive type of the language itself
[...More...]

"Homoiconicity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Grammar-oriented Programming
Grammar-oriented programming (GOP) and Grammar-oriented Object Design (GOOD) are good for designing and creating a domain-specific programming language (DSL) for a specific business domain. GOOD can be used to drive the execution of the application or it can be used to embed the declarative processing logic of a context-aware component (CAC) or context-aware service (CAS). GOOD is a method for creating and maintaining dynamically reconfigurable software architectures driven by business-process architectures
[...More...]

"Grammar-oriented Programming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Action Language
In computer science, an action language is a language for specifying state transition systems, and is commonly used to create formal models of the effects of actions on the world.[1] Action languages are commonly used in the artificial intelligence and robotics domains, where they describe how actions affect the states of systems over time, and may be used for automated planning. Action languages fall into two classes: action description languages and action query languages. Examples of the former include STRIPS, PDDL, Language A (a generalization of STRIPS; the propositional part of Pednault's ADL), Language B (an extension of A adding indirect effects, distinguishing static and dynamic laws) and Language C (which adds indirect effects also, and does not assume that every fluent is automatically "inertial"). There are also the Action Query Languages P, Q and R
[...More...]

"Action Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Constraint Logic Programming
Constraint logic programming is a form of constraint programming, in which logic programming is extended to include concepts from constraint satisfaction. A constraint logic program is a logic program that contains constraints in the body of clauses. An example of a clause including a constraint is A(X,Y) :- X+Y>0, B(X), C(Y). In this clause, X+Y>0 is a constraint; A(X,Y), B(X), and C(Y) are literals as in regular logic programming. This clause states one condition under which the statement A(X,Y) holds: X+Y is greater than zero and both B(X) and C(Y) are true. As in regular logic programming, programs are queried about the provability of a goal, which may contain constraints in addition to literals. A proof for a goal is composed of clauses whose bodies are satisfiable constraints and literals that can in turn be proved using other clauses
[...More...]

"Constraint Logic Programming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Inductive Logic Programming
Inductive logic programming (ILP) is a subfield of machine learning which uses logic programming as a uniform representation for examples, background knowledge and hypotheses. Given an encoding of the known background knowledge and a set of examples represented as a logical database of facts, an ILP system will derive a hypothesised logic program which entails all the positive and none of the negative examples.Schema: positive examples + negative examples + background knowledge ⇒ hypothesis. Inductive logic programming is particularly useful in bioinformatics and natural language processing
[...More...]

"Inductive Logic Programming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Time-driven Programming
Time-driven programming is a computer programming paradigm, where the control flow of the computer program is driven by a clock and is often used in Real-time computing. A program is divided into a set of tasks (i.e., processes or threads), each of which has a periodic activation pattern. The activation patterns are stored in a dispatch table ordered by time. The Least-Common-Multiple (LCM) of all period-times determines the length of the dispatch table. The scheduler of the program dispatches tasks by consulting the next entry in the dispatch table. After processing all entries, it continues by looping back to the beginning of the table. The programming paradigm is mostly used for safety critical programs, since the behaviour of the program is highly deterministic. No external events are allowed to affect the control-flow of the program, the same pattern (i.e., described by the dispatch table) will be repeated time after time
[...More...]

"Time-driven Programming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.