HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Princeton University Press
press.princeton.edu Princeton University
Princeton University
PressU.S. Historic district Contributing propertyShow map of Mercer County, New JerseyShow map of New JerseyShow map of the USLocation 41 William Street, Princeton, New JerseyCoordinates 40°20′59.8″N 74°39′13.3″W / 40.349944°N 74.653694°W / 40.349944; -74.653694Coordinates: 40°20′59.8″N 74°39′13.3″W / 40.349944°N 74.653694°W / 40.349944; -74.653694Built 1911Architect Ernest FlaggArchitectural style Collegiate GothicPart of Princeton Historic District (#75001143)Added to NRHP 27 June 1975 Princeton University
Princeton University
Press is an independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University
[...More...]

"Princeton University Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Constance McLaughlin Green
Constance McLaughlin Winsor Green (August 21, 1897 in Ann Arbor, Michigan – December 5, 1975 in Annapolis, Maryland) was an American historian, who won the 1963 Pulitzer Prize for History
Pulitzer Prize for History
for Washington, Village and Capital, 1800–1878 (1962).[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Publications, prizes, and honorary degrees 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Green was born at Ann Arbor, Michigan. Her father was historian Andrew C. McLaughlin. She completed a bachelor's degree at Smith College
Smith College
in 1919 and a Master's degree at Mount Holyoke College
Mount Holyoke College
in history in 1925. After graduation, Green served as a part-time instructor at Mount Holyoke from 1925 to 1932
[...More...]

"Constance McLaughlin Green" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Academia
An academy (Attic Greek: Ἀκαδήμεια; Koine
Koine
Greek Ἀκαδημία) is an institution of secondary education, higher learning, research, or honorary membership
[...More...]

"Academia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sebastian De Grazia
Sebastian de Grazia (1917- 2000) was an American author. Born in Chicago, he received his bachelor's degree and a doctorate in political science from the University of Chicago. During World War II he served in the Office of Strategic Services, predecessor to the Central Intelligence Agency
Central Intelligence Agency
as an analyst. In 1962-1988 he taught political philosophy at Rutgers University. He received the 1990 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography
Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography
for his 1989 book Machiavelli in Hell
[...More...]

"Sebastian De Grazia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Simon A. Levin
Simon Asher Levin (born April 22, 1941) is an American ecologist. He is a James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Ecology
Ecology
and Evolution and the Director of the Center for BioComplexity at Princeton University.[1] He specializes in using mathematical modeling and empirical studies in the understanding of macroscopic patterns of ecosystems and biological diversities.Contents1 Background1.1 Awards, distinctions2 References 3 External linksBackground[edit] Levin received his B.A. from Johns Hopkins University. He went on to receive his Ph.D
[...More...]

"Simon A. Levin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gene Grossman
Gene Michael Grossman (born December 11, 1955, in New York) is the Jacob Viner Professor of International Economics at Princeton University. He received his B.A. in Economics from Yale University
Yale University
in 1976 and his Ph.D. in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1980. He became assistant professor at Princeton University in 1980 and full professor of economics in 1988. His research focuses on international trade, in particular on the relationship between economic growth and trade and the political economy of trade policy. He is also known for his work on the environmental Kuznets curve.[2] He frequently collaborated with Elhanan Helpman. In 2009, Grossman received an honorary doctorate in Economics from the University of St. Gallen
[...More...]

"Gene Grossman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

National Book Award
The National Book Awards are a set of annual U.S. literary awards.[1][2] At the final National Book Awards Ceremony every November, the National Book Foundation presents the National Book Awards and two lifetime achievement awards to authors. The National Book Awards were established in 1936 by the American Booksellers Association,[3][4] abandoned during World War II, and re-established by three book industry organizations in 1950. Non-U.S. authors and publishers were eligible for the pre-war awards. Now they are presented to U.S
[...More...]

"National Book Award" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pulitzer Prize
The Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
/ˈpʊlɪtsər/[1] is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of American (Hungarian-born) Joseph Pulitzer who had made his fortune as a newspaper publisher, and is administered by Columbia University
Columbia University
in New York City.[2] Prizes are awarded yearly in twenty-one categories. In twenty of the categories, each winner receives a certificate and a U.S
[...More...]

"Pulitzer Prize" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Historical Document
Historical documents are original documents that contain important historical information about a person, place, or event and can thus serve as primary sources as important ingredients of the historical methodology. Significant historical documents can be deeds, laws, accounts of battles (often given by the victors or persons sharing their viewpoint), or the exploits of the powerful. Though these documents are of historical interest, they do not detail the daily lives of ordinary people, or the way society functioned. Anthropologists, historians and archeologists generally are more interested in documents that describe the day-to-day lives of ordinary people, indicating what they ate, their interaction with other members of their households and social groups, and their states of mind
[...More...]

"Historical Document" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Witherspoon
John Witherspoon
John Witherspoon
(February 5, 1722 – November 15, 1794) was a Scottish-American
Scottish-American
Presbyterian
Presbyterian
minister and a Founding Father of the United States.[1] Witherspoon embraced the concepts of Scottish Common Sense Realism, and while president of the College of New Jersey (1768–1794; now Princeton University), became an influential figure in the development of the United States' national character. Politically active, Witherspoon was a delegate from New Jersey
New Jersey
to the Second Continental Congress
Second Continental Congress
and a signatory to the July 4, 1776, Declaration of Independence. He was the only active clergyman and the only college president to sign the Declaration.[2] Later, he signed the Articles of Confederation
Articles of Confederation
and supported ratification of the Constitution
[...More...]

"John Witherspoon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Printing Press
A printing press is a device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink. It marked a dramatic improvement on earlier printing methods in which the cloth, paper or other medium was brushed or rubbed repeatedly to achieve the transfer of ink, and accelerated the process. Typically used for texts, the invention and global spread of the printing press was one of the most influential events in the second millennium.[1][2] Johannes Gutenberg, a goldsmith by profession, developed, circa 1439, a printing system by adapting existing technologies to printing purposes, as well as making inventions of his own. Printing
Printing
in East Asia had been prevalent since the Tang dynasty,[3][4] and in Europe, woodblock printing based on existing screw presses was common by the 14th century
[...More...]

"Printing Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charles Scribner II
Charles Scribner II
Charles Scribner II
(October 18, 1854 – April 19, 1930) was the president of Charles Scribner's Sons
Charles Scribner's Sons
and a trustee at Skidmore College.Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 Family 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] He was born in New York City on October 18, 1854. He joined his father's publishing company in 1875 after his Princeton graduation.[1] When the other partners in the venture sold their stake to the family, the company was renamed Charles Scribner's Sons. In 1884, Scribner's younger brother, Arthur Hawley Scribner, joined Charles Scribner's Sons. The book publishing business was highly successful, and in 1886 Scribner's Magazine
Scribner's Magazine
was relaunched. It too was a great success
[...More...]

"Charles Scribner II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Society
A society is a group of individuals involved in persistent social interaction, or a large social group sharing the same geographical or social territory, typically subject to the same political authority and dominant cultural expectations. Societies are characterized by patterns of relationships (social relations) between individuals who share a distinctive culture and institutions; a given society may be described as the sum total of such relationships among its constituent of members. In the social sciences, a larger society often evinces stratification or dominance patterns in subgroups. Insofar as it is collaborative, a society can enable its members to benefit in ways that would not otherwise be possible on an individual basis; both individual and social (common) benefits can thus be distinguished, or in many cases found to overlap. A society can also consist of like-minded people governed by their own norms and values within a dominant, larger society
[...More...]

"Society" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson
Jefferson may refer to: People[edit]Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), third president of the United States Jefferson (footballer, born 1983) Jefferson (footballer, born January 1988) Jefferson (footballer, born August 1988) Geoff Turton or Jefferson (born 1944), British singerContents1 People 2 Places2.1 Canada 2.2 United States 2.3 Proposed U.S
[...More...]

"The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Irwin Unger
Irwin Unger (born 1927, Brooklyn, New York) is an American historian and academic specializing in economic history, the history of the 1960s, and the history of the Gilded Age. He earned his Ph.D. from Columbia University
Columbia University
in 1958 and is currently Professor Emeritus of History at New York University. Unger won the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for History in 1965 for his book, The Greenback Era
[...More...]

"Irwin Unger" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Academic Publishing
Academic publishing is the subfield of publishing which distributes academic research and scholarship. Most academic work is published in academic journal article, book or thesis form. The part of academic written output that is not formally published but merely printed up or posted on the Internet is often called "grey literature". Most scientific and scholarly journals, and many academic and scholarly books, though not all, are based on some form of peer review or editorial refereeing to qualify texts for publication. Peer review quality and selectivity standards vary greatly from journal to journal, publisher to publisher, and field to field. Most established academic disciplines have their own journals and other outlets for publication, although many academic journals are somewhat interdisciplinary, and publish work from several distinct fields or subfields
[...More...]

"Academic Publishing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.