HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Prince Consort
A prince consort is the husband of a queen regnant who is not himself a king in his own right. In recognition of his status, a prince consort may be given a formal title, such as Prince
Prince
or Prince
Prince
Consort, with Prince
Prince
being the most common. However, most monarchies do not have formal rules on the styling of princes consort, thus they may have no special title. Few monarchies use the title of King
King
Consort.Contents1 Usage in Europe 2 Usage in imperial China 3 See also 4 ReferencesUsage in Europe[edit] Prince
Prince
Consort (capitalized) is a formal title, and Prince
Prince
Albert is the only spouse of a British queen to have held it. The title was awarded to him in 1857 by his wife, Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
(reigned 1837–1901)
[...More...]

"Prince Consort" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Royal And Noble Ranks
Traditional rank amongst European royalty, peers, and nobility is rooted in Late Antiquity
Late Antiquity
and the Middle Ages. Although they vary over time and among geographic regions (for example, one region's prince might be equal to another's grand duke), the following is a reasonably comprehensive list that provides information on both general ranks and specific differences.[vague]Contents1 Ranks and title1.1 Sovereign 1.2 Other sovereigns, royalty, peers, and major nobility 1.3 Minor nobility, gentry, and other aristocracy2 Corresponding titles of nobility between languages 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksRanks and title[edit]This article contains embedded lists that may be poorly defined, unverified or indiscriminate. Please help to clean it up to meet Wikipedia's quality standards. Where appropriate, incorporate items into the main body of the article
[...More...]

"Royal And Noble Ranks" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Esquire
Esquire
Esquire
(British English: /ɪˈskwaɪə/;[1] American English: /ˈɛsˌkwaɪr/ or /ɪˈskwaɪr/;[2] abbreviated Esq.)[3] is usually a courtesy title. In the United Kingdom, Esquire
Esquire
historically was a title of respect accorded to men of higher social rank, particularly members of the landed gentry above the rank of gentleman and below the rank of knight. In 1826, William Blackstone
William Blackstone
reiterated that, "the title should be limited to those only who bear an office of trust under the Crown and who are styled esquires by the king in their commissions and appointments; and all, I conceive, who are once honoured by the king with the title of esquire have a right to that distinction for life."[4][5] By the early 20th century, it came to be used as a general courtesy title for any man in a formal setting, usually as a suffix to his name, as in "Todd Smith, Esq.", with no precise significance
[...More...]

"Esquire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Emperor
An emperor (through Old French
Old French
empereor from Latin imperator[1]) is a monarch, usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. Empress, the female equivalent, may indicate an emperor's wife (empress consort), mother (empress dowager), or a woman who rules in her own right (empress regnant). Emperors are generally recognized to be of a higher honour and rank than kings. In Europe
Europe
the title of Emperor
Emperor
has been used since the Middle Ages, considered in those times equal or almost equal in dignity to that of Pope, due to the latter's position as visible head of the Church and spiritual leader of the Catholic part of Western Europe
[...More...]

"Emperor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baronet
A baronet (/ˈbærənɪt/ or /ˈbærəˌnɛt/;[1] abbreviated Bart or Bt[1]) or the rare female equivalent, a baronetess (/ˈbærənɪtɪs/,[2] /ˈbærənɪtɛs/,[3] or /ˌbærəˈnɛtɛs/;[4] abbreviation Btss), is the holder of a baronetcy, a hereditary title awarded by the British Crown. The practice of awarding baronetcies was originally introduced in England in the 14th century and was used by James I of England
James I of England
in 1611 as a means of raising funds. A baronetcy is the only British hereditary honour that is not a peerage, with the exception of the Anglo-Irish
Anglo-Irish
Black Knight, White Knight
Knight
and Green Knight
Knight
(of which only the Green Knight
Knight
is extant)
[...More...]

"Baronet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lady
The word lady is a civil term of respect for a woman among English speakers. It is the equivalent of gentleman. It is also a formal title in the United Kingdom. "Lady" is used before the surname of a woman with a title of nobility or honorary title suo jure, or the wife of a lord, a baronet, and a knight, and also before the first name of the daughter of a Duke, Marquess, or Earl
Earl
throughout the United Kingdom. Once used to describe only women of a high social class, race, community, and status in Europe; now the term is commonly used to refer to any adult woman among English-speakers globally
[...More...]

"Lady" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ritter
Ritter
Ritter
(German for "knight") is a designation used as a title of nobility in German-speaking areas. Traditionally it denotes the second-lowest rank within the nobility, standing above "Edler" and below "Freiherr" (Baron). For its historical association with warfare and the landed gentry in the Middle Ages, it can be considered roughly equal to the titles of "Knight" or "Baronet". As with most titles and designations within the nobility in German-speaking areas, the rank was normally hereditary and generally was used with the nobiliary particle of von or zu before a family name. The wife of a Ritter
Ritter
was called a "Frau" (in this sense "Lady") and not Ritterin. In the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
the title of " Ritter
Ritter
von" was bestowed upon citizens who deserved more than the plain "von" but were not considered deserving enough as to be given a barony as "Freiherr"
[...More...]

"Ritter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ridder (title)
Ridder ([ˈrɪdər]; English: "Knight") is a noble title in the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Belgium. Traditionally it denotes the second lowest rank within the nobility, standing below Baron, but above the untitled nobility (Jonkheer) in these countries. "Ridder" is a literal translation of Latin Eques and originally meant "horseman" or "rider". For its historical association with warfare and the landed gentry in the Middle Ages, it can be considered roughly equal to the titles of "Knight" or "Baronet". In the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Belgium
Belgium
no female equivalent exists. The collective term for its holders in a certain area as an executive and legislative assembly is named the Ridderschap (e.g
[...More...]

"Ridder (title)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Knight
A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch or other political leader for service to the monarch or country, especially in a military capacity. Historically, in Europe, knighthood was conferred upon mounted warriors.[1] During the High Middle Ages, knighthood was considered a class of lower nobility. By the Late Middle Ages, the rank had become associated with the ideals of chivalry, a code of conduct for the perfect courtly Christian warrior. Often, a knight was a vassal who served as a fighter for a lord, with payment in the form of land holdings.[2] The lords trusted the knights, who were skilled in battle on horseback. Knighthood
Knighthood
in the Middle Ages was closely linked with horsemanship (and especially the joust) from its origins in the 12th century until its final flowering as a fashion among the high nobility in the Duchy of Burgundy in the 15th century
[...More...]

"Knight" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dame
Dame
Dame
is an honorific title and the feminine form of address for the honour of knighthood in the British honours system and the systems of several other Commonwealth countries, such as Australia
Australia
and New Zealand, with the masculine form of address being Sir
[...More...]

"Dame" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Knighthood
A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch or other political leader for service to the monarch or country, especially in a military capacity. Historically, in Europe, knighthood was conferred upon mounted warriors.[1] During the High Middle Ages, knighthood was considered a class of lower nobility. By the Late Middle Ages, the rank had become associated with the ideals of chivalry, a code of conduct for the perfect courtly Christian warrior. Often, a knight was a vassal who served as a fighter for a lord, with payment in the form of land holdings.[2] The lords trusted the knights, who were skilled in battle on horseback. Knighthood
Knighthood
in the Middle Ages was closely linked with horsemanship (and especially the joust) from its origins in the 12th century until its final flowering as a fashion among the high nobility in the Duchy of Burgundy in the 15th century
[...More...]

"Knighthood" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Laird
Laird
Laird
(/ˈlɛərd/) is a generic name for the owner of a large, long-established Scottish estate, roughly equivalent to an esquire in England, yet ranking above the same in Scotland. In the Scottish order of precedence, a laird ranks below a baron and above a gentleman. This rank is only held by those lairds holding official recognition in a territorial designation by the Lord
Lord
Lyon King
King
of Arms
[...More...]

"Laird" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Viscount
A viscount (/ˈvaɪkaʊnt/ ( listen) VY-kownt, for male[1]) or viscountess (/ˈvaɪkaʊntɪs/, for female[2]) is a title used in certain European countries for a noble of varying status, but historically deemed to convey a lower-middling rank.[3] In many countries a viscount, and its historical equivalents, was a non-hereditary, administrative or judicial position, and did not develop into a hereditary title until much later.[4] In the case of French viscounts, it is customary to leave the title untranslated as vicomte [vi.kɔ̃t] and vicomtesse.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Early modern and contemporary usage3.1 Belgium 3.2 United Kingdom3.2.1 Ireland 3.2.2 Use as a courtesy title 3.2.3 Coronet3.3 Jersey 3.4 Portugal 3.5 Spain4 Equivalent titles4.1 Germanic counterparts 4.2 Non-Western counterparts5 See also 6 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word viscount comes from
[...More...]

"Viscount" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edler
Edler
Edler
(German: [ˈeːdlɐ]) was until 1919 the lowest rank of nobility in Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
and Germany, just beneath a Ritter
Ritter
(hereditary knight), but above untitled nobles, who used only the nobiliary particle von before their surname. It was mostly given to civil servants and military officers, as well as those upon whom the lower rank of an Order had been conferred. The noun Edler
Edler
comes from the adjective edel ("noble"), and translated literally means "noble [person]". In accordance with the rules of German grammar, the word can also appear as Edle, Edlem, or Edlen depending on case, gender, and number. Originally, from the Middle Ages, under the feudal system (in Europe and elsewhere), the nobility were generally those who held a fief, often in the form of heritable land worked by vassals
[...More...]

"Edler" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jonkheer
Jonkheer
Jonkheer
(female equivalent: jonkvrouw; French: Écuyer) is a honorific in the Low Countries
Low Countries
denoting the lowest rank within the nobility. In the Netherlands, this in general concerns a prefix used by the untitled nobility. In Belgium, this is the lowest title within the nobility system, recognised by the Court of Cassation.[1][citation needed] It is the cognate and equivalent of the German noble honorific Junker, which was historically used throughout the German-speaking part of Europe, and to some extent also within Scandinavia.Contents1 Honorific
Honorific
of nobility 2 Title of nobility 3 Coronet 4 Nickname 5 See also 6 References Honorific
Honorific
of nobility[edit] Jonkheer
Jonkheer
or jonkvrouw is literally translated as "young lord" or "young lady"
[...More...]

"Jonkheer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Junker
Junker
Junker
(German: Junker, Dutch: Jonkheer, English: Yunker, Scandinavian: Junker) is a noble honorific, derived from Middle High German Juncherre, meaning "young nobleman"[1] or otherwise "young lord" (derivation of jung and Herr)
[...More...]

"Junker" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.