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Prince
A PRINCE is a male ruler or member of a monarch's or former monarch's family. _Prince_ is also a title of nobility , often hereditary , in some European states . The feminine equivalent is a princess . The English word derives, via the French word _prince_, from the Latin noun _princeps _, from _primus_ (first) + _capio_ (to seize), meaning "the chief, most distinguished, ruler , prince"
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Prince (musician)
PRINCE ROGERS NELSON (June 7, 1958 – April 21, 2016) was an American singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer. Prince was a musical innovator who was known for his eclectic work, flamboyant stage presence, extravagant dress and makeup, and wide vocal range . His music integrated a wide variety of styles, including funk , rock , R 1933–2002) and John Lewis Nelson (1916–2001). His parents were both African-American and his family ancestry is centered in Louisiana
Louisiana
, with all four of his grandparents hailing from that state. Prince's father was a pianist and songwriter, and his mother was a jazz singer. Prince was given his father's stage name, Prince Rogers, which his father used while performing with a jazz group called the Prince Rogers Trio. In 1991, Prince's father told A Current Affair , "I named my son Prince because I wanted him to do everything I wanted to do." Prince's childhood nickname was Skipper
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Royal And Noble Ranks
Traditional rank amongst European royalty , peers , and nobility is rooted in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages . Although they vary over time and between geographic regions (for example, one region's prince might be equal to another's grand duke ), the following is a reasonably comprehensive list that provides information on both general ranks and specific differences. CONTENTS* 1 Ranks and title * 1.1 Sovereign * 1.2 Other sovereigns, royalty, peers, and major nobility * 1.3 Minor nobility, gentry, and other aristocracy * 2 Corresponding titles of nobility between languages * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links RANKS AND TITLE _ This article contains embedded lists that MAY BE POORLY DEFINED, UNVERIFIED OR INDISCRIMINATE . Please help to clean it up to meet Wikipedia's quality standards. Where appropriate, incorporate items into the main body of the article
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Emperor
An EMPEROR (through Old French _empereor_ from Latin _IMPERATOR _ ) is a monarch , usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. EMPRESS, the female equivalent, may indicate an emperor's wife (_empress consort _), mother (_empress dowager _), or a woman who rules in her own right (_empress regnant _). Emperors are generally recognized to be of a higher honour and rank than kings . In Europe
Europe
the title of Emperor
Emperor
has been used since the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
, considered in those times equal or almost equal in dignity to that of Pope
Pope
, due to the latter's position as visible head of the Church and spiritual leader of the Catholic part of Western Europe
Europe
. The Emperor of Japan is the only currently reigning monarch whose title is translated into English as "Emperor"
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King
KING is the title given to a male monarch in a variety of contexts. The female equivalent is queen regnant (while the title of queen on its own usually refers to the consort of a king). * In the context of prehistory, antiquity and contemporary indigenous peoples, the title may refer to tribal kingship . Germanic kingship is cognate with Indo-European traditions of tribal rulership (c.f. Indic _rājan _, Gothic _reiks _, and Old Irish _rí _, etc.) * In the context of classical antiquity, king may translate Latin _rex _ or either Greek _archon _ or _basileus _. * In classical European feudalism , the title of _king_ as the ruler of a KINGDOM is understood as the highest rank in the feudal order, potentially subject, at least nominally, only to an emperor (harking back to the client kings of the Roman Empire ). * In a modern context, the title may refer to the ruler of one of a number of modern monarchies (either absolute or constitutional)
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Archduke
ARCHDUKE (feminine: ARCHDUCHESS; German: _Erzherzog_, feminine form: _Erzherzogin_) was the title borne from 1358 by the Habsburg rulers of the Archduchy of Austria , and later by all senior members of that dynasty. It denotes a rank within the former Holy Roman Empire (962–1806), which was below that of Emperor and King and above that of (debatably) a Grand Duke, Duke and Prince . The territory ruled by an Archduke or Archduchess was called an Archduchy. All remaining Archduchies ceased to exist in 1918
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Grand Prince
The title GRAND PRINCE or GREAT PRINCE ( Latin : _magnus princeps_, Greek : _megas archon_) ranked in honour below king and emperor and above a sovereign prince . Grand duke is the usual and established, though not literal , translation of these terms in English and Romance languages , which do not normally use separate words for a "prince" who reigns as a monarch (e.g., Albert II, Prince of Monaco ) and a "prince" who does not reign, but belongs to a monarch's family (e.g., Prince William, Duke of Cambridge ). German, Dutch, Slavic and Scandinavian languages do use separate words to express this concept, and in those languages _grand prince_ is understood as a distinct title (for a cadet of a dynasty ) from _grand duke_ (hereditary ruler ranking below a king). The title of _grand prince_ was once used for the sovereign of a "grand principality"
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Grand Duke
The monarchic title of GRAND DUKE (feminine: GRAND DUCHESS) ranked in order of precedence below emperor and king , and above that of sovereign prince and sovereign duke . It is or was used in some independent nations or states in Europe, particularly: * In present-day Luxembourg * Historically for the sovereigns of former independent countries such as: Tuscany (from 1569 to 1860, now part of Italy); Baden , Oldenburg , Saxe-Weimar , Mecklenburg-Schwerin , etc
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Infante
_INFANTE_ (Spanish: , Portuguese: ; f. _INFANTA_), also anglicised as INFANT or translated as PRINCE , is the title and rank given in the Iberian kingdoms of Spain (including the predecessor kingdoms of Aragon , Castile , Navarre and León ), and Portugal , to the sons and daughters (_infantas_) of the king, sometimes with the exception of the heir apparent to the throne who usually bears a unique princely or ducal title. The wife of an _infante_ was accorded the title of _infanta_ if the marriage was dynastically approved (e.g. Princess Alicia of Bourbon-Parma ), although since 1987 this is no longer automatically the case in Spain (e.g. Princess Anne d\'Orléans ). Husbands of born _infantas_ did not obtain the title of _infante_ through marriage (unlike most hereditary titles of Spanish nobility ), although occasionally elevated to that title _de gracia_ ("by grace") at the sovereign's command
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Duke
A DUKE (male) ( British English : /djuːk/ or American English : /duːk/ ) or DUCHESS (female) can either be a monarch ruling over a duchy or a member of the nobility , historically of highest rank below the monarch . The title comes from French _duc_, itself from the Latin _dux _, 'leader', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank (particularly one of Germanic or Celtic origin), and later coming to mean the leading military commander of a province. The title dux survived in the Eastern Roman Empire where it was used in several contexts signifying a rank equivalent to a captain or general. Later on, in the 11th century, the title Megas Doux was introduced for the post of commander-in-chief of the entire navy. During the Middle Ages the title (as _ Herzog _) signified first among the Germanic monarchies
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Fürst
FüRST (German pronunciation: ( listen ), female form FüRSTIN, plural FüRSTEN; from Old High German furisto, "the first", a translation of the Latin
Latin
princeps ) is a German word for a ruler and is also a princely title. Fürsten were, since the Middle Ages , members of the highest nobility who ruled over states of the Holy Roman Empire and later its former territories, below the ruling Kaiser (emperor ) or König (king ). A Prince
Prince
of the Holy Roman Empire was the reigning sovereign ruler of an Imperial State that held imperial immediacy in the boundaries of the Holy Roman Empire. The territory ruled is referred to in German as a Fürstentum (principality ), the family dynasty referred to as a Fürstenhaus (princely house), and the (non-reigning) descendants of a Fürst
Fürst
are titled and referred to in German as Prinz (prince ) or Prinzessin (princess)
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Marquess
A MARQUESS (UK : /ˈmɑːrkwɪs/ ; French : _MARQUIS_, ; Italian : _marchese_, Spanish : _marqués_, Portuguese : _marquês_) is a nobleman of hereditary rank in various European peerages and in those of some of their former colonies. The term is also used to translate equivalent Asian styles, as in imperial China and Japan . In the German lands, a Margrave was a ruler of an immediate Imperial territory (examples include the Margrave of Brandenburg , the Margrave of Baden and the Margrave of Bayreuth ), not simply a nobleman like a marquess or marquis in Western and Southern Europe. German rulers did not confer the title of marquis; holders of marquisates in Central Europe were largely associated with the Italian and Spanish crowns
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Margrave
MARGRAVE was originally the medieval title for the military commander assigned to maintain the defense of one of the border provinces of the Holy Roman Empire or of a kingdom . That position became hereditary in certain feudal families in the Empire, and the title came to be borne by rulers of some Imperial principalities until the abolition of the Empire in 1806 (e.g., Margrave of Brandenburg , Margrave of Baden ). Thereafter, those domains were absorbed in larger realms or the titleholders adopted titles indicative of full sovereignty. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Rank * 3 Usage * 4 Translations * 5 Variations * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 External links HISTORYEtymologically, the word _MARGRAVE_ (Latin: _marchio_ ca. 1551) is the English and French form of the German noble title _MARKGRAF_ (_Mark_ "march " + _ Graf _ " Count "), which also is semantically related to the English title MARCHER LORD
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Landgrave