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Pressure Washer
Pressure washing
Pressure washing
or power washing is the use of high-pressure water spray to remove loose paint, mold, grime, dust, mud, chewing gum and dirt from surfaces and objects such as buildings, vehicles and concrete surfaces. The volume of a mechanical pressure washer is expressed in gallons or litres per minute, often designed into the pump and not variable. The pressure, expressed in pounds per square inch, pascals, or bar, is designed into the pump but can be varied by adjusting the unloader valve. Machines that produce pressures from 750 to 30,000 psi (5 to 200 MPa) or more are available. Hydro-jet cleaning is a more powerful form of power washing, employed to remove buildup and debris in tanks and lines.[1]Contents1 See also 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksSee also[edit]Briggs & Stratton Kärcher Nilfisk Reverse graffitiReferences[edit]^ Blaxter & Russell; J. H. S. Blaxter; Frederick S. Russell (1984)
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Chewing Gum
Chewing gum
Chewing gum
is a soft, cohesive substance designed to be chewed without being swallowed
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Reverse Graffiti
Reverse graffiti, also known as clean tagging, dust tagging, grime writing, clean graffiti, green graffiti or clean advertising, is a method of creating temporary or semi-permanent images on walls or other surfaces by removing dirt from a surface. It can also be done by removing dirt/dust with the fingertip from windows or other dirty surfaces, such as writing "wash me" on a dirty vehicle
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Pascal (unit)
The pascal (symbol: Pa) is the SI derived unit
SI derived unit
of pressure used to quantify internal pressure, stress, Young's modulus
Young's modulus
and ultimate tensile strength. It is defined as one newton per square metre.[1] It is named after the French polymath Blaise Pascal. Common multiple units of the pascal are the hectopascal (1 hPa = 100 Pa) which is equal to one millibar, and the kilopascal (1 kPa = 1000 Pa) which is equal to one centibar. The unit of measurement called standard atmosphere (atm) is defined as 101325 Pa.[2] Meteorological reports typically state atmospheric pressure in millibars.Contents1 Etymology 2 Definition 3 Standard units 4 Uses4.1 Hectopascal and millibar units5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The unit is named after Blaise Pascal, noted for his contributions to hydrodynamics and hydrostatics, and experiments with a barometer
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Society For Protective Coatings
SSPC: The Society for Protective Coatings (SSPC) is a professional association for the industrial protective and marine coatings industry. It was founded in 1950 as the Steel Structures Painting Council, a non-profit association concerned with the use of coatings to protect steel structures such as bridges, ships, water tanks, and locks and dams. Since the original mission of the organization evolved over the years to include structures built with materials other than steel (concrete, composite materials, etc.), the name was changed in 1997 to SSPC: The Society for Protective Coatings. As of the end of 2016, there are approximately 11,500 members worldwide. There are also approximately 960 corporate members. Industrial painting contractors are a primary beneficiary of SSPC's efforts. SSPC develops and publishes widely used industry standards for surface preparation, coating selection, coating application, painting contractor certification, and testing
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Frederick Stratten Russell
Sir Frederick Stratten Russell DSC DFC FRS[1] (3 November 1897 – 5 June 1984) was an English marine biologist. Russell was born in Bridport, Dorset, and studied at Gonville and Caius College, at the University of Cambridge. From 1924 he worked for the Marine Biological Association in Plymouth, becoming its director in 1945. He was elected to the Royal Society
Royal Society
in 1938, was awarded the Linnean Medal
Linnean Medal
in 1961, and knighted in 1965. The National Marine Biological Library at the Marine Biological Association retains much of Russell's scientific and personal papers for the period 1921-1984.[2] Russell studied the life histories and distribution of plankton. He also discovered a means of distinguishing between different species of fish shortly after they have hatched. He was the author of The Medusae of the British Isles (1953–1970)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Nilfisk
Nilfisk is a supplier of professional cleaning equipment in both industrial, commercial and consumer markets.[1] The company is headquartered in Brøndby, Denmark, with sales entities in 45 countries and dealers in more than 70 countries. Nilfisk has manufacturing facilities in Hungary, Italy, Germany, Denmark, the United States, Mexico, Brazil, and China. It has approximately 5,500 employees worldwide. The company's core businesses are the supply of industrial and commercial cleaning machines and professional high-pressure cleaning equipment. Nilfisk also markets vacuum cleaners and high-pressure cleaners to consumers. The Nilfisk Group's main global brands are Nilfisk, Nilfisk-ALTO,[2] and Viper. The largest regional brands are Advance and Clarke
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Pounds Per Square Inch
The pound per square inch or, more accurately, pound-force per square inch (symbol: lbf/in2;[1] abbreviation: psi) is a unit of pressure or of stress based on avoirdupois units. It is the pressure resulting from a force of one pound-force applied to an area of one square inch. In SI units, 1 psi is approximately equal to 6895 N/m2. Pounds per square inch
Pounds per square inch
absolute (psia) is used to make it clear that the pressure is relative to a vacuum rather than the ambient atmospheric pressure. Since atmospheric pressure at sea level is around 14.7 psi, this will be added to any pressure reading made in air at sea level. The converse is pounds per square inch gauge (psig), indicating that the pressure is relative to atmospheric pressure
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Bar (unit)
The bar is a metric unit of pressure, but is not approved as part of the International System of Units (SI)
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Kärcher
Alfred Kärcher
Alfred Kärcher
GmbH & Co. KG is a German family-owned company that operates worldwide and is known for its high-pressure cleaners, floor care equipment, parts cleaning systems, wash water treatment, military decontamination equipment and window vacuum cleaners.[1] Headquartered in Winnenden, Germany, it produces both cleaning equipment and full cleaning systems. The world market leader in cleaning technology, employs more than 10,000 people worldwide. In 2014 the company posted sales revenues of €2.12 billion ($2.84 billion) and sold 12.72 million machines. Kärcher
Kärcher
has 100 subsidiaries in 60 countries.Contents1 History 2 Common noun 3 Cultural sponsorship 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The inventor Alfred Kärcher
Alfred Kärcher
(1901–59) from Baden-Württemberg founded the company in 1935 in Stuttgart
Stuttgart
Bad-Cannstatt
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Briggs & Stratton
Briggs & Stratton is a Fortune 1000
Fortune 1000
manufacturer of gasoline engines with headquarters in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. Engine production averages 10 million units per year as of April 2015.[4] The company reports that it has 13 large facilities in the US and 8 more in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Mexico, and the Netherlands. The company's products are sold in over 100 countries across the globe
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Needlegun Scaler
A needlegun scaler, needle scaler or needle-gun is a tool used to remove rust, mill scale, and old paint from metal surfaces.[2] The tool is used in metalwork applications as diverse as home repair, automotive repair and shipboard preservation.[3][4][5]Contents1 Operation and use 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksOperation and use[edit] A needle gun has a set of very fine chisels known as needles.[3] The tool forces these needles against a work surface at variable speeds up to around 5,000 times per minute.[3][2] Different models offer choices of number of needles, operating speed, and power levels.[3] Many models use compressed air, although electrical needle-guns do exist.[3][6] In a pneumatic unit, compressed air forces a piston forwards and backwards.[3] This movement causes the needles to move back and forth against the work surface.[3]An able seaman uses a needlegun to remove scale while refurbishing a mooring winch.The needle gun
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Vacuum Cleaner
A vacuum cleaner, also known as a sweeper or hoover, is a device that uses an air pump (a centrifugal fan in all but some of the very oldest models), to create a partial vacuum to suck up dust and dirt, usually from floors, and from other surfaces such as upholstery and draperies. The dirt is collected by either a dustbag or a cyclone for later disposal. Vacuum
Vacuum
cleaners, which are used in homes as well as in industry, exist in a variety of sizes and models—small battery-powered hand-held devices, wheeled canister models for home use, domestic central vacuum cleaners, huge stationary industrial appliances that can handle several hundred litres of dust before being emptied, and self-propelled vacuum trucks for recovery of large spills or removal of contaminated soil
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Tawashi
A tawashi (たわし or 束子, lit., a bundle) is a scrubbing brush for wet cleaning, of a style that is popular in Japan. Traditionally, tawashis were made of a hemp palm.In Japan, sponges used for rubbing and washing are now treated as forms of tawashi. A metallic tawashi (金属たわし, kinzoku tawashi) is made of metal; steel, stainless steel, and brass are frequent choices
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