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Pressure Point
A pressure point (Chinese: 穴位; Japanese: kyūsho 急所 "vital point, tender spot";[1] Sinhala: නිල/මර්ම ස්ථාන Nila/Marma Sthana (in Angampora); Telugu: మర్మ స్థానం Marma Sthanam; Malayalam: മര്‍മ്മം marmam; Tamil: வர்மம் varmam) derives from the meridian points in Traditional Chinese Medicine
Traditional Chinese Medicine
and Indian Ayurveda
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Kampo
Kampo
Kampo
medicine (漢方医学, Kanpō igaku), often known simply as Kanpō (漢方, Chinese [medicine]), is the study of traditional Chinese medicine in Japan following its introduction, beginning in the 7th century.[1] Since then, the Japanese have created their own unique system of diagnosis and therapy
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Water Fluoridation Controversy
The water fluoridation controversy arises from political, moral, ethical, economic, and safety concerns regarding the fluoridation of public water supplies
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Bonesetter
A bonesetter is a practitioner of joint manipulation. Before the advent of chiropractors, osteopaths, and physical therapists, bonesetters were the main providers of this type of treatment.[1] Traditionally, they practiced without any sort of formal training in accepted medical procedures.[2] Bonesetters would also reduce joint dislocations and "re-set" bone fractures.Contents1 History 2 21st century 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The practice of joint manipulation and treating fractures dates back to ancient times and has roots in most countries. The earliest known medical text, the Edwin Smith papyrus of 1552 BC, describes the Ancient Egyptian treatment of bone-related injuries. These early bonesetters would treat fractures with wooden splints wrapped in bandages or made a cast around the injury out of a plaster-like mixture
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Chiropractic
Chiropractic
Chiropractic
is a form of alternative medicine mostly concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of mechanical disorders of the musculoskeletal system, especially the spine.[1][2] Proponents claim that such disorders affect general health via the nervous system.[2] These claims are not backed by any evidence
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Homeopathy
Homeopathy
Homeopathy
or homœopathy is a system of alternative medicine developed in 1796 by Samuel Hahnemann, based on his doctrine of like cures like (similia similibus curentur), a claim that a substance that causes the symptoms of a disease in healthy people would cure similar symptoms in sick people.[1] Homeopathy
Homeopathy
is a pseudoscience – a belief that is incorrectly presented as scientific. Homeopathic preparations are not effective for treating any condition;[2][3][4][5] large-scale studies have found homeopathy to be no more effective than a placebo, indicating that any positive effects that follow treatment are only due to the placebo effect, normal recovery from illness, or regression toward the mean.[6][7][8] Hahnemann believed the underlying causes of disease were phenomena that he termed miasms, and that homeopathic preparations addressed these
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Mesmerism
Animal magnetism, also known as mesmerism, was the name given by the German doctor Franz Mesmer
Franz Mesmer
in the 18th century to what he believed to be an invisible natural force (lebensmagnetismus) possessed by all living/animate beings (humans, animals, vegetables, etc.). He believed that the force could have physical effects, including healing. He tried persistently but without success to achieve scientific recognition of his ideas.[1] The vitalist theory attracted numerous followers in Europe and the United States and was popular into the 19th century. Practitioners were often known as magnetizers, rather than mesmerists. For about 75 years from its beginnings in 1779 it was an important specialty in medicine, and continued to have some influence for about another 50 years. Hundreds of books were written on the subject between 1766 and 1925
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Naturopathy
Naturopathy
Naturopathy
or naturopathic medicine is a form of alternative medicine that employs an array of pseudoscientific practices branded as "natural", "non-invasive", and as promoting "self-healing"
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Orgone
Orgone[pronunciation?] is a pseudo-scientific[1][2][3][4][5][6][7] and spiritual concept described as an esoteric energy or hypothetical universal life force, originally proposed in the 1930s by Wilhelm Reich.[8][9][10] As developed by Reich's student Charles Kelley after Reich's death in 1957, orgone was conceived as the anti-entropic principle of the universe, a creative substratum in all of nature comparable to Mesmer's animal magnetism (1779), to the Odic force (1845) of Carl Reichenbach
Carl Reichenbach
and to Henri Bergson's élan vital (1907).[11] Orgone
Orgone
was seen as a massless, omnipresent substance, similar to luminiferous aether, but more closely associated with living energy than with inert matter
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Osteopathy
Osteopathy is a type of alternative medicine that emphasizes manual readjustments, myofascial release and other physical manipulation of muscle tissue and bones.[1][2] Practitioners of osteopathy are referred to as osteopaths.[3][4][5] Its name derives from Ancient Greek "bone" (ὀστέον) and "sensitive to" or "responding to" (-πάθεια).[6][7][8] While the national health services of some countries consider there to be "good" evidence for osteopathy as a treatment for low back pain and "limited evidence to suggest it may be effective for some types of neck, shoulder or lower limb pain and recovery after hip or knee operations", there is little, or insufficient, evidence that osteopathy is effective as a treatment for health conditions "unrelated" to the bones and muscles, "such as headaches, migraines, painful periods, digestive disorders,
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Parapsychology
Parapsychology
Parapsychology
is a field of study concerned with the investigation of paranormal and psychic phenomena which include telepathy, precognition, clairvoyance, psychokinesis, near-death experiences, reincarnation, apparitional experiences, and other paranormal claims. It is identified as pseudoscience by a vast majority of mainstream scientists.[1][2] Parapsychology
Parapsychology
research is largely conducted by private institutions in several countries and funded through private donations,[3] and the subject rarely appears in mainstream science journals
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Phrenology
Phrenology
Phrenology
(from Ancient Greek φρήν (phrēn), meaning 'mind', and λόγος (logos), meaning 'knowledge') is a pseudomedicine primarily focused on measurements of the human skull, based on the concept that the brain is the organ of the mind, and that certain brain areas have localized, specific functions or modules.[1] Although both of those ideas have a basis in reality, phrenology extrapolated beyond empirical knowledge in a way that departed from science
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Radionics
Radionics
Radionics
is an alternative medicine that claims disease can be diagnosed and treated with a kind of energy similar to radio waves.[1] The concept behind radionics originated in the early 1900s with Albert Abrams (1864–1924), who became a millionaire by leasing radionic machines which he designed himself.[1] Radionics
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Vaccine Controversies
Vaccine
Vaccine
controversies have occurred since almost 80 years before the terms vaccine and vaccination were introduced, and continue to this day
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Acupuncture
Acupuncture[note 1] is a form of alternative medicine[3] in which thin needles are inserted into the body.[4] It is a key component of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). TCM theory and practice are not based upon scientific knowledge,[5] and acupuncture is a pseudoscience.[6][7] There is a diverse range of acupuncture theories based on different philosophies,[8] and techniques vary depending on the country.[9] The method used in TCM is likely the most widespread in the United States.[3] It is most often used for pain relief,[10][11] though it is also used for a wide range of other conditions
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MMR Vaccine Controversy
The MMR vaccine
MMR vaccine
controversy started with the 1998 publication of a fraudulent research paper in The Lancet
The Lancet
linking the combined measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine to colitis and autism spectrum disorders.[1] The claims in the paper were widely reported,[2] leading to a sharp drop in vaccination rates in the UK and Ireland and increases in the incidence of measles and mumps, resulting in deaths and serious permanent injuries.[3][4] Following the initial claims in 1998, multiple large epidemiological studies were undertaken
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